Road Rat sizing dilema

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  • Road Rat sizing dilema
  • hydrophil
    Member

    Im 6ft3 and thinking of a L roadrat but cant for the life of me find one to try – anyone got experience good or bad of tall riders on R/Rats?

    cynic-al
    Member

    Do you have an existing bike or can try something similar then compare the numbers?

    head tube and top tube are the most important IMO.

    How’re you planning on building it up? I’m assuming flat bars and mtb components?

    Which then begs the question, why not get a mountain bike. I don’t really see the point in the roadrat, I think it’s the let down in a good range of Cotic bikes. Hopefully they’ll get ride of it and make a proper road bike!

    cynic-al
    Member

    Nothing wrong with hybrids.

    hydrophil
    Member

    Fed up with my road bike, too skippy

    Which then begs the question, why not get a mountain bike?

    I want something that feels/handles like a mountain bike, that I can build up like a MTbike, is quick that I can put thin tyres on and is good for training rides on the road. Im not the one for long road rides with white lycra clad roadies and I dont want another MTBike.
    I know folks who like their RRats so I guess its horses for courses.

    What do you mean your road bike is too skippy?

    I’ve used slicks on my mtb on the road, it’s fine. I could then put my proper tyres on and it’d be great off road though!

    What about a cx bike? Their cross bike looks better. Although Im guessing you dont want drop bars?

    hydrophil
    Member

    Cotic have stopped making the >X< now and yes I dont want drop bars anymore
    Skippy – very light, too light at the front end, want something a bit more sturdy (i.e. flat bars) – i guess its a personal thing about how road bikes feel to me

    Have you seen them odd flat/drop bar combo things? Salsa do some, “bell” something or other. Could be a good compromise

    hydrophil
    Member

    will look at Salsa thanks

    What road bike do you have now? I’ve got a Genesis Equilibrium, and when it had steel forks and 28c tyres, it felt pretty bloody solid, even with drop bars.

    Premier Icon Clink
    Subscriber

    Every time I ride my RR I fall in love with it again. The angles just feel spot on and it’s very versatile. Quite happily rode with local roadie son mine last Sunday – ss and big tyres.

    Can’t help with sizing – I’m 5’10” on a medium.

    Premier Icon Ben_H
    Subscriber

    I asked Cotic what the situation is with their replacement for the X. I’d like to replace my X and I’m not quite convinced by a flat bar hybrid.*

    They say that they are due a replacement for the >X< in March.

    Apparently it’s something more road-focused; with a lower BB, longer top tube and the rear end of a Roadrat. Disc only. I’m sold.

    *P.S. I tried my 700c X wheels on my Soul recently. It was a nice ride, but the lesson I took home was don’t confuse a MTB with slicks for a capable mile-muncher. I think there’s a lot of difference in the geometry even between a Soul / Solaris and a Roadrat, let alone an X or something more road-focused.

    Premier Icon Seamus
    Subscriber

    I’m 6ft 4 and ride a large/long RR, designed for flat bars but I use Midge bars with a 90mm stem. Its not supposed to work like that but I love it both on and off road with fixed gear and 700c wheels, there will be lots of seatpost showing. The only thing I didn’t like was the heavy and harsh fork. I changed it for an Alpina carbon cross fork, which much improved the ride.

    brakes
    Member

    if you find road bikes a bit skippy, you’ll like the Road Rat.
    it’s about as skippy as a dead sodden badger.
    very versatile bikes though… mine is currently making a lovely orange shed ornament.

    Premier Icon GavinB
    Subscriber

    Phil – I’ve had a large RR for about 5 years now. If you check my posting history, you’ll probably pick up that I’m not too positive about it. As soon as I can afford to, I’ll give it away and get something else.

    It’s tough and adaptable, but has some issues: not surprisingly, its heavy. Next issue: commuters tend to have mudguards – so don’t work at all well with horizontal dropouts (try changing a flat with that set up without having to unbolt the guards). Next – flexier than a flexy thing, esp when run SS. I’ve never ridden something so unsuited to being loaded up and toured with due to the flex. Fork: stiff and harsh. It took me a while to realise this as I ran it with MTB bars which had more flex than the road bars I put on last winter. Running full length guards also makes running a front mech a challenge.

    Having said all this, I’ve used it for day to day commuting, trailer dragging, winter trainer, light CX use and just popping to the shops. If you’re in the NW of England, you’re welcome to try mine (email in profile)

    brakes
    Member

    Next – flexier than a flexy thing, esp when run SS. I’ve never ridden something so unsuited to being loaded up and toured with due to the flex. Fork: stiff and harsh.

    whilst I agree that it’s flexy, it’s not designed to be a tourer is it?
    I ran mine fixed and whilst it wasn’t very sharp to accelerate, I don’t think it was designed to be.

    localhero94
    Member

    I’m 6’3″ and ride a large roadrat – I run it as a flat-barred single speed for winter training or summer rides with the kids and it’s great. No, it’s not as stiff as my proper road bike but then it’s not intended for that.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Wow… interesting thread… I’ve been discussing buying a RR for some longer distance XC type events and road commuter.

    wobbliscott
    Member

    I think its a great bike. Mines currently in full road bike mode with 20 gears and drop bars. I wouldn’t say it was flexy, it’s compliant, but no more compliant than any other steel lugged race bike I’ve had in the past, but it makes it a very comfy bike compared to a super stiff road race bike. Also the geometry makes it feel very maneuverable without being twitchy like a road race bike. It’s not intended to be a serious race bike or touring bike to be loaded up for an epic adventure, but for a relaxed (key word) but competent bike it’s perfect. I really like mine for commuting and general messing about with the kids, and if I fancy an extended ride on my way home from work, it’s more than competent and capable of putting in a good 30 to 40 mile ride within a few percent of the speed of a more serious road bike.

    Premier Icon Clink
    Subscriber

    What wobbliscott said ^

    Premier Icon kelvin
    Subscriber

    Forks: the original Roadhog forks were pretty damn overbuilt and stiff (I fitted second hand carbon Eastons to mine instead) but the current tapered leg forks are completely different.

    Stiffness: I’ve never had any problem here with my ancient Roadrat… but the current gen had an ovalform top tube added, and the next gen coming in the spring has a fatter down tube I think.

Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)

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