Road bike – should I?

Home Forum Bike Forum Road bike – should I?

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)
  • Road bike – should I?
  • Oxboy
    Member

    Commuter bikes are good, go get one, you can never have too many . . . .

    Jamie
    Member

    Must be something in the air, as of late i have thought about dipping my toe into the darkside as quite like the idea of boshing along at silly speeds, plus it means i could use that as my cardio instead of running. Prob is there does not seem much out there for £500ish quid.

    …..plus of course i would have to get all new lyrca 😀

    coffeeking
    Member

    🙂 500ish is a bit high for me to dabble but youre right, it does seem to be 250 or 750+

    coffeeking
    Member

    I’m torn. I currently use the rigid MTB, set up with slicks at 90psi and 2*8 (46/36, 11-28), flat bars, long stem, bar ends. Somehow never feels quite comfy, I often feel my shoulders and neck ache and my lower back is extremely bent over, but I can deal with it. I can hold ~20mph on the 10 miles to work but thats pretty hard. So I’m thinking, do I find a cheap road bike, maybe s/h, or do I tweak this one to suit a bit better? It’s gt a quill stem so raising the bars is a bit of a pain and more costly than a cheap stem. One part of me fancies a nice new bike, the other thinks it’s just a waste. Am I missing out?

    zaskar
    Member

    I hope a road bike won’t aggreviate your pains and aches.

    I was hitting 20mph and racing roadies from Bath to Bristol on a mtb with slicks 2 yrs ago.

    Shows that your fit regardless of bike and how versatile a mtb is.

    Try a roadbike out and get a proper fit so you’re comfy.

    You’ll fly like a rocket.

    I’ve ruined my commuter by fitting rack and mud guards…it’s just so much fun to ride on.

    Look for a cheap Trek 1200 from 2006/7?

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    While not a ‘road ride’ i have a nice carbon roadie with Ultegra that I do most of my base training miles on these days. I’m a committed mountain biker but find that to get to/from work its quicker and more comfortable + i can then put training miles in as well.

    As with all roadies the fit is the most important thing – a badly fitted road bike will feel awful if you spend any time on it. I get mine refitted every now and then as well depending on how fit/what racing I am doing as it varies how flexible and what strength i have.

    Depends on your commute though and whether you would use it as much as say a flat bar commuter which would have a slightly more upright position and be possibly more flexible – I dunno.

    But I don;t regret buying my roadie and its definitely helped me get fitter and makes the commute better. Thats using bombproof tyres to avoid too many punctures – with my race wheels and aerobars on it absolutely flies and was quite cheap.

    mieszko
    Member

    I use my road converted cx for commuting as first thing it’s plain quicker second that if You chain something with drop bars and full mudguards any chav will walk pass it disgusted and will not notice Ksyriums or Veloce bits on it that are not that bad after all.

    I can only have two bikes as there is no storage space in my flat so they are both in my room.

    Just got some puncture proof tires that are not the lightest but didn’t have to repair a puncture for the last 3 months.

    If You’re planning to commute despite the weather all year round than consider a bike with mudguard clearance because Race Blades are not that good in keeping water out of Your shoes or face (but bum will be dry).

    If You’re still not sure than try the £250 bracket bikes. You can get a decent second hand Carrera with Tiagra STI’s and You could see for Yourself whether You want one or not and than go for something better to use it as a training bike as well. Bikes from that price region should be good enough and don’t fall apart, of course second hand is the way to go.

    If You’re willing to spend more there was a nice Schwinn for sale by Hopefiendboy.

    Road bikes are great, effortless speed, and You’ll win almost any commuter race as the bike is quicker than a city bike or because of the close gearing, better than a converted mtb.

    You’ll probably need to pay a bit more attention than on a mountain bike as to try not to hit all the pot holes or avoid broken glass plus the brakes are not adequately good to the speed a road bike can reach.

    mieszko
    Member

    (edit) somehow I managed to send that post twice. Can’t delete it so just erased the text (edit)

    woffle
    Member

    I’d echo going down the 2nd hand route – £250 buys you something reasonable before splurging large amounts of money you’re unsure of (and with depreciation it’s not like you’d be able to sell on an unwanted bike for what you paid for it).

    I just wish I had the room to store one.

    cynic-al
    Member

    why call yourself a “committed mountainbiker” when you do loads of road riding?

    I’ll just never get why people are stuck with stupid labels.

    Oh and op you probably will enjoy a road bike.

    DrP
    Member

    I suffered a serious personality changing head injury a few weeks back and bough myself one of these…

    400 squid from halfords as it’s an 08 model.
    It’s basically road bike geometry, with discs and flat bars/bar ends.

    I must say it’s awfully good fun, and you really can just jump on and rack up the miles on it – in a way it’s easier to go for a ride on it than the MTB as you can just shove a bottle in, dress up in tight clothing, and go! You don’t get muddy or nowt!

    What got me is how QUICK big skinny wheels are! Phenomenally fast i tell thee…..

    Of course, now my brain damage has fixed, I may as well keep it now i’ve got it…..

    DrP

    they are £350 now 🙂

    AndyP
    Member

    yes, yes you should. definitely. But get a proper road bike, none of this flat bar/disc nonsense.

    2tyred
    Member

    Can’t see how you’re going to make what you describe that much comfier for a daily 10 miler.

    I think I live quite near you – I do 10 miles along the canal partway then into town and I’m currently riding a fixed steel road frame with courier bars and bulletproof tyres on a big ratio, and its ace. Ridden it in the past on various commuters and mtbs, but the road geometry of the current machine just makes it feel… proper.

    The answer is always get a new (to you) bike.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    Get yourself an old steel roadbike.
    I’ve done the slicks/bar ends thing on a mtb before & while it improves matters there’s just no comparison to my road bike.
    700c w/23mm’s are a lot tougher than you think you know, if looked after.
    Sissy levers are sensible but you’ll be laughed at.

    Jamie
    Member

    DrP – Member

    I suffered a serious personality changing head injury a few weeks back and bough myself one of these…

    400 squid from halfords as it’s an 08 model.
    It’s basically road bike geometry, with discs and flat bars/bar ends.

    I must say it’s awfully good fun, and you really can just jump on and rack up the miles on it – in a way it’s easier to go for a ride on it than the MTB as you can just shove a bottle in, dress up in tight clothing, and go! You don’t get muddy or nowt!

    What got me is how QUICK big skinny wheels are! Phenomenally fast i tell thee…..

    Of course, now my brain damage has fixed, I may as well keep it now i’ve got it…..

    DrP

    Hmmmmm.

    *counts pennies*

    coffeeking
    Member

    Thanks for the input everyone, added to my thoughts nicely.

    Just one Q – what are sissy levers when they’re at home?!

    thomthumb
    Member

    lots of cyclists are reluctant to spend money on commuter bikes, i proably ride as many miles and spend as much time on my commuter as my other bikes, why put up with a shed.

    i used to spend £60 a week on diesel, moved jobs, cycle in, now down to £40 a month. a £800 bike would pay for itself in 4 months. that’s how i justify it anyway!

    coffeeking
    Member

    TBH mines not really a shed – its perfectly acceptable, just not as comfy as it could be. It’s still finely honed with XT mechs front and rear, middleburn hardcote rings up front, XTR cassette. Works fine, just isnt a road bike and I was wondering if there was a benefit. Suppose I could lob on 700c wheels but thats really just really just changing gearing :D.

    Mister P
    Member

    Sissy levers are extra brake levers so you can slow down whilst holding the top of the bars like these –

    coffeeking
    Member

    Ahh gotcha!

    RichPenny
    Member

    Where are you coffeeking, and how tall? I’ve got an old steel road bike you could borrow for a bit if you want. If I can get it out of the house, then I can justify getting a Bianchi 🙂 Not sure if I want to sell it, as I inherited it from my dad who had it custom built. It should fit if you’re anywhere about 5’8″. My brother road it lots though, and he’s 6′

    coffeeking
    Member

    Thanks for the offer, very kind of you but unfortunately I’m both too far away (Glasgow) and too tall (6’1). Much appreciated though!

    coffeeking
    Member

    2tyred – what time of day do you ride? I think we are pretty nearby IIRC, I come from Kirky way down the canal (but was considering swapping to using the roads) to the west end.

    fisha
    Member

    what slicks have you got on the mtb? are they large wide ones? or super skinnies?

    super skinnies like ultra gator skins 1 1/8″ ones are waaaaaaay faster than the likes of the larger slicks like nokian AWS.

    i have super skinnies on a rigid mtb ( very good frame + carbon rigid forks ) I’d say its about 90 to 95% as efficient on the road as my full road bike. It seems to lose out on overall aero drag mostly in my opinion.

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    >why call yourself a “committed mountainbiker” when you do loads of road riding?

    I’ll just never get why people are stuck with stupid labels.
    <

    Oooh p0wn3d by cynic-al, take that Col.

    Ahahahaha x 10000000

    Have a look at Orbea road bikes I bought an Enol about 8 years ago now and that was £500 and still going strong.

    buy buy buy you will enjoy it! Can go to Majorca training in April and do Sa colobra 12 k of up up up unless you go down into the valley for a coffee then decide to catch the boat out 😆

    2tyred
    Member

    CK – I take the canal from Kirky to the bridge at Balmore road, by Possil marsh then into town, round about 8ish. Homewardbound around 6ish.

    If you’re going to the west end, you could either continue on the canal to Maryhill (not much further) or I think the Kelvin has a path from Torrance all the way to Kelvinbridge. Either way is pleasant – give or take the odd random loony around Possil – and traffic free. I love my commute.

    We’re the same height – if you fancy a shot of my fixie, give us a shout and we can try to meet up.

    glasgowdan
    Member

    2tyred/coffeeking, I’m moving to Torrance, just bought a house there, and should be in by Mid May, so I might hook up with you for the commute. I try not to get too sweaty on the ride on though! I’m possibly going to be drawn in to cycling with the girlfriend for a bit first though, and the route along the canal to Balmore Road Bridge is the one I’ll be taking, starting at the road bridge near the Torrance Roundabout.

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

The topic ‘Road bike – should I?’ is closed to new replies.