Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)
  • Road bike comfort.
  • Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    I’ve been a bit spoiled of late, riding a steel 35c shod bike. My old Planet X SL could do with having some comfort upgrades. At the moment I have 23c’s and an alloy 31.6 ritchey post.

    A bit of googling suggests the max I can go tyre wise is 25 with maybe a 28 up front. I’m wondering if anyone has successfully added a bit more comfort with seatpost swaps? Something like the canyon post or even running a 27.2 with a suitable shim. Not exactly a fan of shimming mind you.

    I’ve had the bike a while and I’m sure the road surfaces have become markedly worse. Either that or my older bones can’t take it anymore.

    Premier Icon IvanMTB
    Subscriber

    Are you thinking about one of these?

    Be prepared to have a bit of creak occasionally and little saddle wobble… Apart of that pretty good, but 28c tyre with 45-50PSI inside beats all fancy posts and flat stays…

    Cheers!
    I.

    Tyre pressure is key to comfort. What tyre pressures are you running? Dare I say it tubeless at 60psi is way nicer on your bones than the 100psi some folk run at on tubed tyres.

    Premier Icon dovebiker
    Subscriber

    I would look at tubeless tyres first – new rims and tyres would work out at the same price as the Canyon seat post.

    My road bike is titanium and carbon, takes 25mm tyres – relatively forgiving in comparison to some of the other bikes I’ve owned and I preferred it for racing due to the fact the tyres would stay in contact with the ground when under power I’ve just got a carbon Diverge with carbon wheels running 32mm tubeless Panaracer slicks @ 40psi – it’s no slower on the road that an outright race bike.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    If you want a decent increase in comfort, and you have the means, then flog the bike now while prices are high – and get something new with clearance for 28 or 30mm tyres at your leisure.

    If that’s not an option, definitely go with a nice supple 25mm tyre in the rear and the same or 28mm front.

    Carbon seatposts can help, but the difference is negligible in some cases.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    Tyre pressure is at 100psi and tubed.

    How are tubeless tyres working with rim brakes? Any concerns. I would consider another wheelset to take advantage of tubeless tech.

    epicsteve
    Member

    My ancient Roubaix is the most comfortable bike I’ve ridden. While part of that is down to the design of the bike itself there are a few points worthy of consideration e.g.
    – 25mm tyres – the bike is noticeably more comfortable on those than it was on the original 23’s
    – seatpost – the Roubaix seatpost has an insert to make it more compliant and it does seem to work. Mine didn’t originally have one but switching to it helped. How much of that was the move to a carbon post from an alloy one, and how much was the Zertz stuff I don’t know
    – bar tape – changing to thicker bar tape helps quite a bit. I’ve not tried it but I’ve heard some long distance riders say that they double tape the bars to aid comfort

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Tyre pressure is at 100psi

    *winces for OP*

    I found around 70 or 80psi with 25mm fairly comfy, but just moved to 28mm tubeless on a new bike and it’s a real eye opener dropping the pressure a bit further.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Wider tyres / lower pressure will make the biggest difference.

    I’ve been running mine lower and lower since getting back into road riding – just trying to find the lowest I can get away with. I now use 80/70 in 25mm tubed tyres (80kg rider).

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    New bike purchase maybe next year, and I do have the other bike(charge plug, on 35c marathon Supremes) which was meant to be a commuter/winter/light tour bike but has seen more miles than the road bike. I’d really like to eek out the last bit of use out of it. 28/25 seems like a fair starting point.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    Thing was 100/110+ psi was par for the course 10/20 years ago. I did have a pair of 25’s on a bike then too and it did make a difference, wasn’t as many choices then for decent 25’s.

    butcher
    Member

    If you want a decent increase in comfort, and you have the means, then flog the bike now while prices are high – and get something new with clearance for 28 or 30mm tyres at your leisure.

    This does seem the sensible solution long term.

    You’re talking about something you can really only do so much with. I’ve tried changing seatposts on bikes and never noticed any difference to be honest.

    Premier Icon didnthurt
    Subscriber

    Been running tubeless tyres on stans Alpha rims for 6 years. I always buy decent tubeless tyres from brands I can trust though like Hutchinson and Vittoria. I’m pretty comfy on 25mm (28mm is a touch too close to the fork crown for my liking) at 80psi and I’m 75kg and ride pretty rough roads. Does help having shallow ish rims on a quality steel frame, titanium saddle rails and 27.2 seatpost.

    servo
    Member

    The canyon seatpost has a lot of movement. You can visibly move it by leaning on the saddle when off the bike. A bit disconcerting at first but rate it now.

    My ancient Roubaix is the most comfortable bike I’ve ridden.

    Funnily enough, I came here to say the same about my old aluminium (2012) Defy. It’s so comfy over poor quality tarmac – I really don’t know how they achieved it. Currently running on 23s at ~80psi so it’s not the tyres! Carbon seatpost perhaps helps, but I think it’s the frame design.

    If you only believed what you read online, you’d think my steel-framed, large/low pressure (35cx40psi) tyred Croix de Fer would be the comfiest bike possible. But the Defy is so much better for long rides.

    So 23mm tyres at 100psi is always going to amplify road imperfections. Cheapest thing to do is try running the tyres at a lower pressure. I don’t know your weight but 80psi should be fine for pinch flat avoidance.

    Next is shove on some supple 25mm tyres and run them with latex tubes. Again run at a lower pressure.

    If you get more punctures then go tubeless but that will cost ( new wheels, new tyres).

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    Ordered some Veloflex tyres, 28 for up front and 25 for the rear. I’ve ran Veloflex before and liked them very much. Don’t last long as I recall but I won’t be on this bike as much as I used to either.

    globalti
    Member

    Good choice. They are fragile but beautifully supple especially with latex inners.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    I’ve used latex in the past. One puncture which ended with a hug split put me off. Pumping up every ride was a bit of faffery I didn’t need either. I’m sure it was trying to get a nice rolling set up, would have been with the Veloflex or a Vittoria set up.

    Was going to suggest https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/SPSEDEHM/selcof-delta-hm-carbon-seat-post , they’ve been ~£55 all year, but I see they’ve been inflated to £70. My 27.2mm one made a positive change to my Cube Attain’s alloy default even with ~31.5mm GP4000S II tyres, even though there is only ~16cm showing above the clamp due to my stumpy legs for someone ~178cm tall.

    Dont recall ever getting a punch flat on a road bike in the last 35 years and I’ve hit pot holes hard enough to injury my hands and buckle wheels, i run 25’s at about 80psi on my “fast” road bike, double wrap of bar tape and its good to go.

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Subscriber

    How old are your shorts? If the pad is worn out then that may make a difference. Also worn lycra….

    Premier Icon mickolas
    Subscriber

    Seatposts.

    I built up a obsidian invictus (velocite selene) “fast bike for fat lads” I think was the tagline so intentionally quite a stiff frame.

    The seattube is 31.6mm but I initially set it up with a shim and the 27.2mm selcof carbon seatpost mentioned above (think I paid £40). It was super light but not too comfy.

    I replaced the post with a miche supertype alloy post (27.2mm) and found that much, much better. The ride went from tooth-jangling to really-quite-good.

    At the same time I changed the handlebar from a carbon bar with a 31.8mm clamp to a nitto alloy bar with 26mm clamp and also saw improvement on the front end – I obviously mustn’t ride hard enough to notice the detriment to stiffness…

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    Tyres arrived and I’ve fitted them only to find the 28 sizes up at 25.5 and the 25 is a 23. Hopefully they maybe expand a bit overnight. Reckon I could have got the ’28’ into the back. Height also seems to be in keeping with the smaller sizes, ie I have no problems with brake clearance. Still I remember these tyres being comfortable in the past in those were labelled 23c so I’ll reserve judgement for now.

    paton
    Member

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    The unfashionable answer: Brooks B73 saddle. 🙂

    But you need a pretty upright riding position.

    irc
    Member

    This article is good on tyre pressure. The theory is that there is no one correct pressure. Varies according to tyre width and rider weight. They suggest getting a pressure so that when the tyre is loaded it sags by 15%. This being a good compromise between comfort and speed. A good starting point anyway then try varying a few psi either way.

    Tire Pressure Take-Home

    Premier Icon 13thfloormonk
    Subscriber

    I replaced the post with a miche supertype alloy post (27.2mm)

    Interrrrrresting… I keep seeing those advertised and keep wondering how they would look on my singlespeed

    Premier Icon Watty
    Subscriber

    My Roubaix. Rear: specialized seatpost with the ‘zertz’ insert, S-Works Turbo 24 @ 80psi – comfy. Front: FACT (whatever?) full carbon forks with zertz inserts, regular Turbo 28 @ 75 psi. The 28 made a huge difference comfort-wise.

    Premier Icon mrchrispy
    Subscriber

    my endurace has one of those post, cant say I really notice it but it is a comfortable bike but
    I’m also running tubed 28mm GP5000s at 60psi on Hunt rims which kinda helps

    Premier Icon antigee
    Subscriber

    a few things that I’ve done on my gravel bike

    not sure what works best but cheapest and does feel better is gel pads under the handlebar tape

    specialized cgr (zertz) seatpost only available as 27.2 I believe have both the old and newer….newer is gob smacking ugly can’t tell apart on performance and does work

    redshift ^^^^^ stem – odd feel odd 80’s style tech but does work for me

    ti railed saddle – now into snake oil area no idea if better and can’t remember where suggestion came from

    biggest improvement running 35mm tubeless at 45/55psi and I get better times on tarmac sections? …so maybe don’t spend too much on current bike unless living with it hurts too much ?

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    cheapest and does feel better is gel pads under the handlebar tape

    I’m gonna be wrapping a new bar soon.

    I usually wrap fairly tight as I like a bit of girth – but now I’m intrigued by gel pads.

    They don’t feel awkward or weird on the road do they?

    Premier Icon mickolas
    Subscriber

    13thfloormonk, supertype is a PITA to fit a saddle tbh but I love it. I put the additional comfort over other posts down to the fact that my bike has only 100mm exposed. Not enough to let the carbon post do its thing maybe, but that is where all the machining is on the miche.

    I wrote an essay on the problems in my review on wiggle.

    https://www.wiggle.co.uk/miche-supertype-seat-post

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