Rigid bikes and downhill sections…

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  • Rigid bikes and downhill sections…
  • shermer75
    Member

    I’m thinking 2.4 front and rear to see if things get better

    This would have been the first thing I would have tried to be honest! Not ridden that particular bit though. That’s the thing about rigid bikes though- slower and sketchier, but more fun!

    noltae
    Member

    Tried some of the faster downhill sections in the Forest of Dean on my Salsa Cro Moto rigids this morning – f##king hell it was sketchy in one or two places – I’m thinking 2.4 front and rear to see if things get better – anyone else trying to push their limit on fully rigid rides? I think of it as the nearest thing to rodeo I’ve ever experienced!

    acehtn
    Member

    Yea another rigid raider !

    Fatter tyres, and air pressure can help. Being able to float the bike…..i hate to say this….being at one with the bike and the track… yes zen crap. Once you get your head round pushing the bike and what you can get away with, without the safety net of suspension to soak up bad form, you will get a bit faster. Probs feel faster than you are going ๐Ÿ™‚

    Hans Dampf 2.4 29″ started at 40psi to ward off pinch flats. Bike was just too skippy and hard to hold lines on. Think i got down to 30psi front and 35psi rear. With the extra volume of a 29″ i should have been able to go lower, but the tyre would squirm on the rim, a set of proper 29er wide rims would help a lot there.

    Track type will effect speed as well, MacAvalanche GlenCoe is balls out wide open, get some speed up and start skimming, but be very sure where your going to touch the front wheel down, had a few tank slappers there, immense fun. Did burst the lower headset bearing jumping things.

    Tried the WC track at Fort William, only from just above the big wallride, not overly techy, lumpy, very fast. Over whelmed the v-brakes, decided not to try and race that one ๐Ÿ™‚ (Jesse did on a 26er rigid, it hurt)
    Raced at Woodlandriders winter series down near Gawton. Immense fun, twisty track, more technical, found out in some of the steeper tighter sections that v-brakes can steer the wheel a bit, brushed a few trees. Really really need some disc ready wide rim 29er wheels, did eye up a 20mm axle cromoto fork.

    Surly Karate Monkey, single speed, rigid, v-brakes, on-one track wheelset which is rather bombproof and easy to change bearings on, rims are scored up from scottish granite. Short stem & wide’ish bars.

    Did the 2010 SSEC at the FOD ๐Ÿ™‚ on a road bike with riser bars & 35mm CX tyres, scared the living daylights out of myself, 1980s budget road calipers really don’t work well, skinny frame was, ummmm comfy(bendy)

    Saw some brilliant riding, got the Monkey later after seeing some being ragged around the forest.

    I tend to smack the rear rim so run more air out back. I just kept letting air out the front until the tyre started squirming, then as i got a bit quicker had to add a bit more to stop smacking the rim.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Ace is madder than me… But big tyres, yeah. Mine has a 2.5 nevegal in the front most of the time, which gives me more suspension than I had on my first suspension bike ๐Ÿ˜† But it can get hard to find grip, the front bounces as much as it bites.

    You get some funny looks, sticking a rigid carrera on the innerleithen cattle truck.

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    I ride in South Central England. Running a rigid 69r at the minute and rarely noticing the lack of squish. Mainly traditional going for a ride xc stuff.

    95kg run tyres pretty soft 2.0 storm control and 2.1 something up front. I run about 30psi both ends.

    Can feel them bottom out gently on the rim occasionally and do get the odd tubeless burp.

    I ride fairly light for a tubby bloke. If I had big rocks to contend with then a spot more pressure and some bigger tyres (probably on some nice wide rims).

    Tubeless 2.35 hans dampf on an LB wide rim at about 20psi or less helps. Some of the FoD sections were long and rattly on my salsa chromotos but still fast for as long as your arms hold out! Try and relax, stay off the brakes and keep wrists down.

    chris_db
    Member

    2.35″ tubeless HD’s here (30psi fr 32 psi r) – Reverb (get that seat down) – knees bent, elbows bent, chest over the headset, let the bike move under you and 150mm+ forks – My C456 goes as well as my AM 150mm full suss.

    2.4 tyre at 16psi for me. Don’t brake during rattly sections to enable you to keep your weight off the handlebars.

    I’ve ridden the FOD downhill sections on my fat front Jones, to say it was an intense experience is an understatement!!! I felt like I was living every microsecond of that trail, no idea how fast it was, but it sure felt it ;). Wide rims and low PSI are key, with a 50mm rim out back you can go as low as 14psi. Try a Surly Knard 3″ tyre on the front, or go fat!

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I can understand the whole ‘big tyre at lowish pressure’ thing but it does seem to be introducing undamped suspension to your rigid bike rather than accepting it’s not got any?

    I run a 2.2 Baron at the front on my rigid singlespeed and managed a PB on one of the faster downhill sections (which is not that downhill, just fast and rooty) at the weekend. I think trying to float the front over stuff rather than just ramming into it was the trick. The dropper post helped too.

    danielgroves
    Member

    2.3 smorgasbords at both ends here. Hammer mine around dartmoor (widow maker anyone?) and the mendips quite happily. Really keeps your toes on the edge, brilliant fun.

    I actually get fast decent times now having been riding rigid for six months than I did in a lot of area on my old Meta. I think the bike suits me a little moreโ€ฆ that and I am in a no wheels on the ground situation so often that I just can’t slow down.

    People can get a little pissed chasing me on full-suss bikes on decantsโ€ฆ and being left behind ๐Ÿ˜€

    Other thing I’ve noticed now if I borrow a friends bike with suspension forks it just feelsโ€ฆ weird. Can’t feel anything from the trail at all.

    Premier Icon BillOddie
    Subscriber

    yep, fat-ish tyre, low-ish pressure and relax. Don’t try to micromanage the bike.

    Dropper helps as you can actually ride the bike properly and not get smacked in the butt by the saddle.

    nbt
    Member

    I’m running 2.2 Ardents on mine, at about 30psi

    Pinch flatted on Saturday for the first time (been riding the bike for about 18 months now), but I did go over a *sweet* jump just before so had no chance to avoid the rocks in front of me. Normally have no problem keeping up with mates on geared/bouncy bikes (on descents anyway). It’s more about keeping your body going in the direction you want to go and letting the bike float underneath you, as mentioned above

    bikeneil
    Member

    Suspension forks?

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    wwaswas – Member

    I can understand the whole ‘big tyre at lowish pressure’ thing but it does seem to be introducing undamped suspension to your rigid bike rather than accepting it’s not got any?

    I can see that, but it still rides like a slighty softer rigid bike rather than a suspension bike. If you think about the difference between a hardtail with a skinny or fat tyre on the back, it’s really just the same.

    grum
    Member

    *bites tongue*

    Lower pressures are less bouncy than higher pressures.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Northwind, I can see the reasons and don’t disagree with them. I guess I just personally see my rigid ss as a ‘do everything’ type bike and low pressures and fat tyres seem to move away from that. When I get my fat bike up and running I’ll be all for big tyres run at low pressures though ๐Ÿ˜‰

    gazc
    Member

    i run a 2.4 chunky monkey on the front of my fortitude, pure awesomeness! ๐Ÿ˜€ going to try ghetto tubeless when i get round to it. riding on my previous local trails (mainly flat rooty natural stuff) was really good fun, certainly polished up my previously lazy riding style

    Premier Icon StefMcDef
    Subscriber

    I ride a Salsa Selma with a carbon fork and a 2.35 Hans Dampf tubeless on the front.

    Also use a dropper post – No doubt poor technique is at the heart of it but I find that there’s a bit of a pole-vault tendency with the rigid forks without it on the worst gnarly sections.

    ESI Chunky foam grips and swept-back Ragley Carnegie-style bars take your hands, arms and wrists out of the firing line a bit if you’re riding rigid.

    mrfowler
    Member

    Afternoon gents

    Anyone tried any rough stuff on a on-one lurcher with on-ones carbon forks? Im near Hamsterly and want to try my rigid bike to see how I climb compared to riding my Orange 5. obviously while im there i want to try the more fun stuff.

    Im worried my excess weight (18 stone) and skinny carbon forks may result in snapped forks and broken teeth!

    Mick

    Premier Icon Cheezpleez
    Subscriber

    Riding rigid has increased my awesome by 5.

    Unfortunately, my spuds have taken such a pounding that I now have to wear a kilt.

    acehtn
    Member

    Have a look here noltae.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/29er-bikes/action-pics-rigids-technical-terrain-782274.html

    Only a small 13 page thread, some nice action from across the pond, and some action from over here ๐Ÿ™‚

    FuzzyWuzzy
    Member

    I can barely see where I’m going due to blur from getting bounced around when doing a fast bumpy descent on my rigid 29er, it’s an experience but I certainly have more fun descending on my 140mm fs

    noltae
    Member

    For me speed is all relative – 35mph on a skateboard feels faster than 100mph in a fast Car – Rigid Bikes don’t handle bumpy/rocky trails sections as efficiently as FS but it’s sooo much fun and feels fast – plus the climb up is much easier – apriciate all the folk chiming in talking techniques. . I think manualing ability helps riding rigid as it helps facilitate kinetic suspension through your body ..

    acehtn
    Member

    Climb up was real easy at Glencoe ๐Ÿ™‚

    Did run the back wheel a bit further back in the dropouts for stability, the short DH stem kept weight back, this helped on fast plateau section, and helped in the rough moorland as so many hidden bog holes that would swallow a 29″ wheel up to the axle and pitch you over the bars.
    With you on picking the front up and rolling through on the back wheel, quite an active ride as you really have to use your body weight to steer the bike. I kind of rode like a big bmx bike, worked for me, most engaging. Might do another DH race if i get disc ready wheels ๐Ÿ™‚

    akasteve
    Member

    Krampus with 3″ Knards (tooblessed) at about 12psi. Ride most of the Peak District descents, mostly get shook to bits. Have to pick your line more carefully than with suspension which is another part of the fun and partly get to the bottom with a mixture of sheer joy and adrenaline from surviving!

    mamadirt
    Member

    Cheers for posting that MTBR link Ace – some great shots – bookmarked it for a leisurely browse at the weekend.

    My new Atomlab build may as well be rigid for all the movement my 8.5 stone bulk can get from those DJs ๐Ÿ˜†

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    In 20ish years of MTBing, I’ve done 2 or 3 rides with a suspension fork. They felt like cheating.

    sbd16v
    Member

    ive never riden a ridged bike offroad so I have no opinion on it, however I can really notice the drag if I let my tyres drop bellow 20psi

    is a ridged bike running a 3 inch tyre at 14 psi REALLY more efficient than a modernday full suspension bike when climbing I struggle to see it is bassed on my own experience of a ”flat” tyre

    Premier Icon Clink
    Subscriber

    In 20ish years of MTBing, I’ve done 2 or 3 rides with a suspension fork. They felt like cheating.

    I rode rigid for many years and loved it. Then I did a 12hr race last summer and by the end of it I was battered. Since then I’ve used a suspension fork (I feel the guilt though! ๐Ÿ˜ณ )

    Rorschach
    Member

    is a ridged bike running a 3 inch tyre at 14 psi REALLY more efficient than a modernday full suspension bike when climbing

    sbd16v
    Member

    sorry I forgot I was on STW which means If I don’t point out the exact place im making the question reference to im wrong

    Bikes don’t handle bumpy/rocky trails sections as efficiently as FS but it’s sooo much fun and feels fast – plus the climb up is much easier

    to add what I mean is I know that tyre pressure also effects suspension feel it may be the case that a ridged bike on 14psi tyres does not drag like a fs one does

    b r
    Member

    I can understand the whole ‘big tyre at lowish pressure’ thing but it does seem to be introducing undamped suspension to your rigid bike rather than accepting it’s not got any?

    This.

    My pal from the south came up last year and we did the Selkirk MTB event. For some insane reason he brought his rigid HT rather than his FS. He struggled to drive home due to the pounding he took on the fast rocky stuff.

    warpcow
    Member

    A guy on a rigid 26″(!) with 2.25″ Crossmarks did alright at an Enduro I was in at the weekend: was 2nd fastest hardtail. Admittedly there were only 5 hardtails total, but still, he finished in the 30s out of 50-odd.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    He struggled to drive home

    This can be avoided by riding home.

    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    noltae
    Member

    Everything in life is a trade of – I’d sooner have my wrists rattle than my pedals bob …..

    xiphon
    Member

    Ask Jessie Wigman – raced the Fort Bill DH Endurance in 2012… on a rigid…. and came 40th overall (top third!)

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Jesse is not human though ๐Ÿ˜† I beat him by one place that day, and I was ruined at the end, even with 16 inches of skill compensation.

    xiphon
    Member

    He’s a machine!

    Nice bloke too, I shared a cable car with him one run.

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