Riding with your dog

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  • Riding with your dog
  • bigsi
    Member

    Ok i know that some of you take your dogs out on rides with you and as i have a boarder collie who i cannot tire out i thought i would give this a go as it gives me a good excuse to get ot on my bike more and exercise the mutt at the same time.

    However on a short ride round my local park recently i discovered he has a liking for my front wheel (trys to run infront of the bike in a kind of backwards sideways action while barking at the front wheel). This makes me nervous about riding at any sort of speed with him.

    Has anyone else experenced this and/or got any ideas on how best to stop him doing it (running him over, owning with bombers etc are not options btw :?).

    Any advice on how the rest of you started riding with your dogs greatfully recd.

    Cheers

    Big Si

    flatback
    Member

    sorry dont mean to be nasty but bikes and dogs dont mix,they run in front of other riders have no trail sence when approaching and being approached by other riders, they are dogs whose owners are meant to be in control of them
    and if it craps on the trail are you really going to pick it up and put it in your camelback
    i dont hate dogs by the way just dogs on bike trails

    bigsi
    Member

    I dont ride trail centres 99% of the time and would NEVER do so with a dog in tow anyway. I will be riding on my own as i agree that a dog with a group of riders in an accident waiting to happen so it will just be me and the mutt early morning weekdays on the Southdowns.

    And yes if the dog takes a crap it will be collected (i have a little bum bag for the poop bag to go in) but hes not a serial poop-er like some dogs are 😆

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Flatback -I have seen dogs that are perfectly content to run with a bike and are no problem whatever. Just needs training properly. Even OK at trail centres

    snaps
    Member

    Accident waiting to happen.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    My Lab use to go with us all the time she was never any problem, she only once got in the way and after being dragged under the bashring for 150 yards never did it again. I never took her to on bike trails though probably because even my dog has more sense then to go to them.

    Collies do tend to nip things that are moving it’s in their nature, she’ll learn the hard way.

    BearBack
    Member

    Sounds harsh, but buzz him with the front tire a few times and he’ll soon stay out of the way of your wheels.

    uplink
    Member

    “and if it craps on the trail are you really going to pick it up and put it in your camelback”

    In most places where you are likely to ride a MTB, I don’t think there’s a legal requirement to clean up after your dog

    bigsi
    Member

    uplink – Member

    “and if it craps on the trail are you really going to pick it up and put it in your camelback”

    In most places where you are likely to ride a MTB, I don’t think there’s a legal requirement to clean up after your dog

    There may not be a legal requirement to do so but given that i hate dog eggs as much as the next rider i would make a point of clearing it up anyway,,, if i felt it was going to be ridden over or trodden on by others 😉

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    You’ll run her over once and that will be it. Enjoy riding with your dog, I always did.

    stumpy01
    Member

    Perhaps some slow local rides initially to get your dog used to the bike and then take it from there. After a few rides, it’ll probably be fine.

    I think in general dogs are OK on trails, although it can get annoying if an owner has no control over their dog.
    It’s a training issue – dog and rider 😀

    Reluctant
    Member

    Billy the border collie came out with us today. He loves it! He does get under the wheels sometimes, tends to do unexpected u-turns to check we’re still there. Shout “mush” and he moves sharpish. I’ve buzzed his nose with my tyre a couple of times, but nothing worse. as long as it’s traffic free, go for it.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Actually, I’ve had two now who run perfectly well with the bike. One has even done CYB (midweek) with us. The staffie tends to be out in front. First things first, without the bike, make sure you have a really strong heel and recall with the dog. The other useful comand is “stay” or “down” at which piont, the dog roots to the spot and does nothing else.

    For the bike specific stuff, mine at first used to bark and chase the front wheel. All i did was ride around the park at a trot, when he barked, I lay the bike down and turned my back to him with one firm, sharp “NO”, then ignored him until he stopped barking. He quickly realised that if he was barking or chasing the front wheel, we were not having fun but just standing around. he also learned left and right. I’d just call before the fork three times “right right right”. Obviously he didn’t get it at first but again, with lots of praise, it didn’t take long for him to figure it out.

    As for the poop, he generally went when we stopped for a breather rather than on any downhill fun flowing bit so picking it up wasn’t a problem. I don’t like dog eggs either. It’s not a legal thing, it’s a moral one.

    Dogs and bikes work fine together provided you put the work in.

    Good luck with it.

    Collie’s tend to chase and “herd” anything that moves, the two I used to use did it with car wheels which was slightly worrying.

    retro83
    Member

    after being dragged under the bashring for 150 yards never did it again

    150 yards?! 😯

    carbon337
    Member

    I have a springer spaniel that i ride with. Im lucky though as he is a rescue and I think he is just so happy to be out of the kennels that he stays near me and does as he is told. I find the faster I ride the better behaved he is – gets his mind into running rather than streams and sticks. I think thats why that Ceasar Milan dude uses skates – dogs seem to prefer to behave better at that half run half trot pace.

    When it comes to the shit thing – im all for picking it up in urban areas outside people houses, playfileds, paths etc, however I dont agree with picking it up in the heather/trees when in forests just to fill up landfills with plastic bags when foxes and deers are crapping al lover the place.

    Premier Icon MussEd
    Subscriber

    OP –

    Boarder Collie

    you say? Like this fella?…

    Well if he can do that he should have the sense to stay out the way of the bikes

    Premier Icon JohnClimber
    Subscriber

    I ride with my Border Terrier at least once a week and he’s no problem.

    You can get a bar and bungee thing that clamps onto your seat post to fasten him to your bike, so he can’t get near or under your wheels. My dog was fine with this for several rides and now he’s fine without it.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    The poop bags I use are biodegradable and as for wild animals pooping in the wilderness, yes they do but they tend not to do it on the frequently used bridalways. Maybe it’s just because I ride a lot in the Peaks which is prettyheavily used that I’ve got into the habit.

    Premier Icon Vortexracing
    Subscriber

    Johnclimber can you give me abit more info on the bar and bungee thing, i’m thinking of getting Archie our border terrier out with me.

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    Yo Vortex!
    My Retriever used to run with me (died in March 08) around the streets, always on a lead, always with a poop scoop.

    I also used to take him to Rivi as well, off the lead, with poop scoop.
    He was a well trained dog who was quite used to the bike but I started along the roads on a lead first then around the fields near my house etc.

    In the years he rode with me, i never ran him over either but his nose did get quite close to the front tyre on occasions.

    He used to go bananas for the first couple of minutes though so holding the lead with one hand and braking with the other is a skill you will need to develop.

    He also wrecked a pile of spokes too with a stick being carried in his gob that he kindly shoved into me wheel.

    I never did a proper ride with him in case he slowed me down or got mowed down by me or other bikers and off road stuck to tracks rather than trails.

    You will have a pile of fun with the dog if you can train him up. Good luck and let us know how it develops.

    5thElefant
    Member

    Not sure where some of you ride, but I come home covered in several types of crap. Adding some dog wouldn’t make any odds. Nicer than fox crap for sure.

    My dog is fine to ride with, I’ve only taken him out a couple of times though as he’s not built for sustained speed.

    Premier Icon Vortexracing
    Subscriber

    Evening coolhand, I’ll see if I can get him trained for this years boxing day meet at Rivvy. Lets see if any more lazy sods can be bothered getting up from their beds next time eh?

    Come to think of it 8:30 at the top of the Pike on Boxing day was a bit of a tall order really.

    dmjb4
    Member

    Bad idea all round – dogs and bikes don’t mix. You can’t control the dog if its off its lead. Plus you might be comfortable with dogs running loose around you, but other trail users don’t know your dog, and are unlikely to feel the same way. Your dog will at the minimum be a distraction, and potentially be a menace. Unexpected things happen to the best of us when cycling, and you have no idea how your dog will react under stress, regardless of how you view its current temprament. Dogs that maim children usually ‘never did anything like that before’.

    Your suggestion will only serve to create dangerous situations or flashpoints for conflict.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    150 yards?! [8O]

    I was moving pretty sharpish and her underneath made breaking difficult as she rolled along it lifted the back wheel most of the time, no harm done.

    matt.bee
    Member

    I fully intend to take my springer lab cross out riding when he’s old enough, great way to tire him out and the faster you go the more likely the dog is to stay close, they don’t want to be left behind by the pack.

    Agree trailcentres, at least in peak times, are out but have no probs with the idea of going out on the South Downs with him.

    Spoiling your enjoyment of the countryside? Sorry, didn’t realise it belonged to you.

    snaps
    Member

    I agree with dmjb4 – I’ve seen 2 riders come off their bikes due to their own dogs & thats 2 to many, its an avoidable risk but if you want to take that risk then fine but when that risk is levied upon me then its a different matter – its selfish to allow your uncontrolled dog to impact on others, even if you think you think you are in control, you do not know what it will do when spooked.
    Talking to a solicitor over Xmas about various things & he’s won 4 cases last year against owners of dogs which caused accidents whilst not under control & has 3 ongoing – if your dog causes an accident & its not on a lead then you are deemed to be not in control of it & liable for its actions & the ‘claims direct’ types will be knocking on your door.

    Peregrine
    Member

    Watch “The Dog Whisperer” you will soon suss out how to stop this behaviour.

    Premier Icon JohnClimber
    Subscriber

    Here you go Vortexracing
    CLICKY
    My Archie got used to it after just 2 rides with it, if your in the North West of England your free to borrow it from me.

    bigsi
    Member

    Cheers for all the comments guys, some interesting points of view on the subject. I wonder how some would view an excited child while out on the trails. This is said with tongue in cheek as they are all valid points i just sometimes wonder about this ‘risk free’ environment because surely if you wanted to avoid risk that much you wouldn’t be on an MTB in the first place :?.

    Will take on board ALL that has been said and once we have had our first trial run on Sunday,, I’ll let you know how i get on 😀

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    dmjb4 I suggest you watch some dog whisperer. All dogs want to be with their leader (the owner if the training has been carried out correctly). If you are travelling at speed the dog runs with the bike and doesn’t rootle around it runs alongside. As Onzadog points out without good recall and stay training no dog will be safe but with this training no problems at all.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    There is a big difference with a dog under control and not under control. As you probably know I am rather anti dog but a good friend of mine has well trained dogs and they do run along with the bike without hassle. the dog needs to be well trained tho – thats the key. One of his dogs ran down the pavement as we cycled down the road – always watching us and waiting to be told when he could cross side streets. I have never seen any other dog so well trained.

    Premier Icon Vortexracing
    Subscriber

    Thanks for the offer Johnclimber. We are in Coppull near Chorley, have you an e mail address?

    soobalias
    Member

    sometimes i ride with my dog, sometimes he’s under control*, like everything it takes practice.
    recommend you start slowly with the dog on a loose lead. if its good walking on a lead you wont have much of a problem riding slowly till it gets it.

    *but sometimes hes not and sometimes he takes a dump in the woods i guess i should have him put down!

    bigsi
    Member

    Ok for those that are interested i have just got back from my first ride with the mutt and i have to say that it went better than expected. 😀

    Took it really easy covering 7 miles in about 45mins. Stopped and restrained the dog whenever cyclists/runners were passing and kept to open trails so as to minimise the potential for dog/bike interfaces. Managed to leave him behind on one long decent but he soon caught up with me as i waited for him at the bottom 🙄

    So in short this will continue as it appears he has learnt not to run infront of my wheel having been buzzed the once 😯 .

    Cheers to all above again for their input 8)

    Got two collies, no probs with trying to eat the bike or anybody else. They both go well into the woods to poop ( like where bears sh1t). One runs infront and the other behind, been out in groups with no probs if you get a bit close to them they move well off the track, every dog is different see what they can and can’t learn from a few rides. If I fall off though the one will come and sit on me and the other just drops a Stick for me to throw, so much for “lassie go get help”

    Premier Icon Brainflex
    Subscriber

    Riding with a dog is ace, meeting folk on cheeky trails means that they focus on the dog rather than your riding. I have had only positive comments while using cheeky trails. Make sure the dog is obediant, eg knows down and recall, and it’s all good.
    Yes there is a chance of an accident but come on, we are riding rough terrain on a bike, get real.

Viewing 37 posts - 1 through 37 (of 37 total)

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