Ribble Carbon Sportive VS boutique carbon

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  • Ribble Carbon Sportive VS boutique carbon
  • foxyrider
    Member

    I have the former and love it – however with all the hype would one notice the difference between this frame and a boutique Italian make etc or would it be subtle and not worth the extra £2-£3K on top. Always wondered that’s all (no its not a loaded question so I go an buy another frame 😉 )

    I can’t tell you which factory but there are ‘striking’ similarities between some of the Ribble carbon frames and Pinarellos; to the extent it’s been commented on in magazine reviews.
    If you’re thinking of something like a Parlee then you are getting a custom built, lugged carbon frame and the additional cost is probably relative but for molded carbon I think you are getting more than your moneys worth with Ribble/Planet X/Pearson etc

    Shibboleth
    Member

    I’d say the pleasure you’d gain from owning an exotic Italian frameset would be unquantifiable. If you can afford it, go for the boutique frame – I’ve never once regretted spending more for something special, but I’ve often regretted settling for run-of-the-mill.

    My first ‘proper’ mountain bike was is a 2003 Blur. It was a toss-up between that, a basic Orange 5 or a Spesh at the time. I still own and love the Blur, and I’m glad I chose to go down the slightly more special route – I’m convinced that owning beautiful, interesting and slightly exclusive bikes is what has kept me so enthusiastic about all forms of cycling.

    mooman
    Member

    I agree with you there Shibboleth

    I went with the ellsworth a few years back rather than the run of the mill spesh/trek/orange etc.
    A boutique branded bike is something your likely to hang on to longer than a run of the mill bike.

    That said. I recently bought a new road bike. Instead of the fancy Italian brands I eventually went for a run of the mill Giant … so ..

    I couldn’t agree more about the pleasure of owning something boutique as I’ve got a Moots road bike but when it comes to generic carbon frames they’re all made by a Taiwanese chick in a dust mask so the question is…which stickers do you prefer on your frame

    foxyrider
    Member

    Yup – style over substance then pretty much 😉

    But you are right:

    Willer Izoard

    Ribble Sportive Carbon

    oldgit
    Member

    I want to get a boutique bike, but not yet. Strangely while I’m still racing I’m happy to ride my PX. When I stop racing I fancy a De Rosa King.

    Exactly. An industry type would probably know numbers but there’s only a few factories making high end carbon frames for all the big bike companies; Heretige and Italian bike companies got very diluted when they outsourced to the far East. I know some Italian companies do carbon ‘inhouse’ but it’s not your big prestige names

    aP
    Member

    Some will be Chinese chicks with dust masks.
    High end Colnago are still made in Italy.

    Shibboleth
    Member

    If you’ve had a ‘proper’ look at the likes of Pinarello etc, you’ll see they’re a class apart compared to the cheap Ribble/Planet X etc.

    The stays – and even the forks – on the Dogma are asymmetric to provide more strength on the drive-side. Whether it makes any difference at anything less than the highest level is debatable, but that could be said for the vast majority of top end anything.

    You want prestige, kudos and exclusivity, you pay the price. If you’re happy to ride a bike that you’ll see dozens more of leaning up outside the café, buy the Ribble.

    I don’t dispute (and would expect) that the design and finish on the Dogma reflects the price tag and it’s flag ship position but on the bikes most people can afford, let’s say 2-3k max, you’re paying for stickers, as the OPs photos illustrate

    GJP
    Member

    Some very interesting pics there FoxyRider. Looking at the websites the geometries also match for a M/52-54.

    Their claimed frame weights do differ substantially with Ribble claiming their frame is 200g lighter than Wilier.

    Wilier have de-specced their Izoard for 2011, now the Izoard XP so save cost, using lower grade carbon and undoubtedly add weight.

    What is true to say not all carbon bikes ride the same and even a fat useless rider myself can tell the difference.

    In terms of carbon framesets I have owned a Time VX, a Felt F1SL and a cheaper Omega Matrix (the latter being a Universal “Mould”)

    The TIME as one would expect was a beautiful example of bike craftsmanship and i loved it until I rode the Matrix and Felt. Both made the Time feel wooden and both tracked the road much more precisely than the TIME.

    I sold the TIME and have since sold the Felt F1 but that’s another tale.

    cynic-al
    Member

    My experience:

    I’ve rarely never once regretted spending more for something special settling for run-of-the-mill, but I’ve often regretted settling for run-of-the-mill spending more for something special.

    If you believe it then the dream may work for you.

    Sorry but I’ve worked on too many bikes and seen how badly some high end stuff is made to believe it any more. It used to be that cheap bikes were guff (eg early Giants were not great frames, recent Claud Butlers etc) but even if the PX is a bargain frame there will be better value from Trek etc than Italy.

    The Italian stuff looks best obviously 😎

    Shibboleth
    Member

    GJP – Member

    Some very interesting pics there FoxyRider. Looking at the websites the geometries also match for a M/52-54.

    Budget Far East bike manufacturers in ripping off Italian company’s R&D shocker! 😉

    FuzzyWuzzy
    Member

    I doubt you’d notice much of a difference between a £500-800 no-name frame and a £1.5-2k branded frame. Once you go above £2k on a frame though you generally start getting something special and not just a £700 frame with a £700 name badge on it. I’m tempted myself to (Parlee etc.) but it always worries me you can’t really demo high-end frames and if I spent £2.5-3k on a frame I’d want it to feel special (not just light etc.).

    RealMan
    Member

    You want prestige, kudos and exclusivity, you pay the price. If you’re happy to ride a bike that you’ll see dozens more of leaning up outside the café, buy the Ribble.

    Disagreeing with this completely. I’ve barely seen anyone else with a ribble. No one with a carbon sportive (what I have), just a few people with the alu winter bike.

    And when you take it to France, you get lots of looks, I don’t think they know about ribble over there.

    If I had the money, no question, I would have a de rosa. But it would be more a work of art then a bike, I’d still ride the ribble, the de rosa would just be something to drool over when I come back home.

    foxyrider
    Member

    I think I have seen 1 person at an audax/sportive with one but that’s it – with your there Realman 🙂

    Shibboleth
    Member

    Maybe it’s because I live in Lancashire, but there’s always a couple of them outside the usual roadie coffee shops in my village…

    They are lovely, don’t get me wrong, but they’re a big seller because they’re such good value.

    I have a Giant TCR carbon (I don’t do much road biking anymore so it’s adequate for my needs – light, comfortable and fairly cheap) but if I ever got back into road biking, it would have to be a top end Cervelo for me. Or a Pin… Or a Colnago…

    RealMan
    Member

    but if I ever got back into road biking, it would have to be a top end Cervelo for me. Or a Pin… Or a Colnago…

    Which is fine if you’re loaded and have money to spare, but what would that cost you? ~£3500

    Is it going to be 3x better then the ribble? No, not at all. For that money I’d have the ribble, upgrade the wheels, and get a winter bike. And still have about a grand to spare on kit.

    oldgit
    Member

    And when you take it to France, you get lots of looks, I don’t think they know about ribble over there.

    I get that with my PX.

    ..agree with shibboleth. Live in lancs and loads of them about. No kudos with ribble, PX etc. (not saying they’re bad bikes)

    If some one turns up at a cafe with a Parlee, BMC, Cervelo (I know they’re made in taiwan) then they generally generate interest.

    In terms of OP’s point, not sure that a premium brand will ride any better but thats not the issue.

    If some one turns up at a cafe with a Parlee, BMC, Cervelo (I know they’re made in taiwan) then they generally generate interest.

    they generate interest amongst uninteresting people who find expensive road bikes interesting

    My planet X is good, I imagine an expensive carbon bike would also be good

    crikey
    Member

    I’ve got one of these

    £1800.

    Is it a ‘better’ bike than a Planet X?

    Well… it’s lighter and nicer to ride for me; the name on the frame doesn’t matter as much as the way it fits, and this one fits me perfectly.

    Would I have a PX? Yes, but I’d prefer another Scott.

    Also, beware of Italian for Italian sake; the vast majority of carbon frames are built in the far east and are all the better for it.

    Shibboleth
    Member

    Aren’t Cervelo built in the US?

    crikey – Member
    I’ve got one of these

    Is it a ‘better’ bike than a Planet X?

    Yes.

    Shibboleth – Member
    Aren’t Cervelo built in the US?

    No (I think the latest sub 800g is, but the rest aren’t)

    warton
    Member

    tricky question by the OP. As others have said, unless you’re spending 3.5k + on a Look, Time, colnago EPS / C59 or a De Rosa the chances are it will be made in the same Taiwanese factory as the ribble, and TBH that carbon ribble looks very nice indeed.

    Also look at the Canyon website for proof that the big brands are way overpriced. I’m buying an aeroad cf in may. £2800 (depending on rates) for a frame the lotto team uses with mavic cosmic carbone wheels and chorus 11 groupset, try finding an Italian (or american) bike with that spec for that price!

    RealMan
    Member

    Also look at the Canyon website for proof that the big brands are way overpriced. I’m buying an aeroad cf in may. £2800 (depending on rates) for a frame the lotto team uses with mavic cosmic carbone wheels and chorus 11 groupset, try finding an Italian (or american) bike with that spec for that price!

    I don’t think my bank account is large enough for me to risk looking, so I will take your word for it.. Have fun with it.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Margin Walker – Member
    If some one turns up at a cafe with a Parlee, BMC, Cervelo (I know they’re made in taiwan) then they generally generate interest.

    If your legs can’t do the talking then don’t bother.

    cheers_drive
    Member

    I have a Sportive Racing and don’t hanker after having a boutique carbon frame instead. I do however often hanker after boutique mountain bikes and would love and custom built stainless steel road frame.

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    They are lovely, don’t get me wrong, but they’re a big seller because they’re such good value.

    No need to go any further than that, is there? 🙂

    foxyrider
    Member

    Thought that might get a discussion going, good to get different views as I am a MTB’r more than a roadie so don’t hang out with many roadies. I’ll stick with my Ribble 🙂

    uponthedowns
    Member

    £1700 fits and rides great and doesn’t look like a Ribble/Willer. If I did have £2-3k to spend on a bike I’d spend £800 on better wheels for the Kuota and the rest on a biking holiday.

    Premier Icon davetrave
    Subscriber

    Disagreeing with this completely. I’ve barely seen anyone else with a ribble. No one with a carbon sportive (what I have), just a few people with the alu winter bike.

    Obviously not ridden around Lancashire then… Can’t escape Preston without seeing someone on a Ribble, usually a blue 7005. That’s why I got a Flandria instead of a Sportive. Carbon frame, Belgian heritage, near enough same value for money as a Ribble andAdam, the bloke in Kirkham who does them (owns the brand, one-man band operation in an industrial unit and direct sales), has a damn sight better track record on customer service than the folk at Walton Summit… Flandria

    foxyrider
    Member

    I live in Devon so I am niche in the SW then 😉 I am not really bothered about being one of many with a particular frame/make but I know some are. Look nice those Flandria – Whats the price tag on the comp frame then?

    Premier Icon davetrave
    Subscriber

    It’s been a while since I spoke to Adam and can’t remember what the prices were that he told me. Not cheap obviously, but certainly not expensive for a carbon frame. As a guide, I’d asked him to price me up a full Dura-Ace build and it worked out a couple of hundred under three grand, while a similarly specced Ribble Sportive, with RS80 wheels instead of DA, would be about 2.5k give or take.

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