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  • Retirement….would you take a lump sum?
  • Premier Icon breninbeener
    Free Member

    Its not a humble brag and i appreciate its a very first world problem, but here goes….

    Im aware that my pension will be more than some people, including family members and friends earn, working full time.

    Im 55 yrs old v soon. That means i can retire should i wish. Im definately going to retire, but i have a bit of a dilemma.

    My pension will start being paid straight away and its index linked. Its linked to whatevr is the lower, CPI or PRi, i cant remember which.

    The long and short is do i take a lump sum or not, as this alters my monthly income.

    The figures are c.£1700pcm after tax, or £1340pcm after tax and a lump sum of c.£120k The higher figure is more than i currently live on after my mortgaga and a small loan that finish in a month.

    Disregarding index linking, the difference will mean around 24yrs of the higher sum to net the lump sum equivalent. That means i will be 79 before the higher monthly pension seems better.

    I have a daughter at University who i have saved enough to support for her next 18 months until she qualifies as a Dr. This wont come from my monthly income. My mortgage will be finished and we would like to do some remedial work to the house. Id like to buy a van and convert for me and MrsB to travel and ride bikes/surf/kitesurf in cool locations.

    As im 55 i realise that the sun is setting on me and that my best years are behind me. The adventures i want to have need to be done before i get too frail and want cocoa and slippers.

    So, what would you do and why? Anyone been in this situation and can say they did it right or wrong?

    thanks

    Ian

    Premier Icon andrewh
    Free Member

    Lump sum.
    Enjoy it, anything might happen. Not point being the richest bloke I the cemetery
    .
    My father did similar at the same age, 55. Bought a small racing boat and a classic car. The former has barely depreciated and the latter has appreciated. His remaining pension has barely recovered to pre 2008 crash levels, he wishes he had taken more.
    Also the boat and car are fun.

    Premier Icon donald
    Free Member

    I have nothing specific to say but the tax free lump sum is generally supposed to one of the major benefits of a pension.

    Premier Icon headfirst
    Free Member

    Take the lump sum and

    buy a van and convert for me and MrsB to travel and ride bikes/surf/kitesurf in cool locations.

    No time like the present! (Once things are normal-ish).

    EDIT: but don’t kitesurf (so last decade) all the cool guys* are wingfoiling now

    *me included B-)

    Premier Icon dirkpitt74
    Full Member

    No brainer – lump sum, you get way more out of your pension pot that way.
    Plus you never know how the future will pan out – enjoy the fruits of your labour.

    Premier Icon timbog160
    Full Member

    I’m not there yet but will be in the same position in a few years. Lump sum is definitely the way to go in my opinion.

    Premier Icon Sui
    Free Member

    lump sum def, go and enjoy yourself.

    andrewh
    Free Member
    Lump sum.
    Enjoy it, anything might happen. Not point being the richest bloke I the cemetery

    try telling that to Italians – plain weird they do think its worth something..

    Premier Icon timbog160
    Full Member

    Also it sounds like you will have a great retirement – enjoy!

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    I would take the lump sum as it is tax free then invest it over time in an ISA. Invest your ISA money in whatever funds/investments you choose then you can take income from that as and when you choose and it can be used to top up your pension income which is taxable above your basic rate. You have the benefit of the money going into your pension tax free but you can reduce the amount of tax you pay when you take it out. It does depend on the specifics of your pension however.

    Taking the lump sum does not mean you have to spend it so taking it can be a savvy decision. Of course you may want to spend it all and thats up to you but its not compulsory.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    Absolute no brainer surely? Lump sum, sweet campervan, tighten belt ever so slightly if that’s even necessary?

    Premier Icon dave661350
    Free Member

    Lump sum, definitely. Bear in mind that at 67 you will also get the state OAP, so another £100-£145 pw after tax.

    Premier Icon grim168
    Full Member

    I’m 53 so a couple of years away and looking at a generous final salary pension. I’ve heard of too many lads at work finishing early and not lasting that long so for me lump sum all the way. My mum has a council pension and two of my late dads pensions but with copd never spends any of it. She’s in her mid 70’s and doesn’t need it. Get it now while your young and relativly fit.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Lump sum, definitely. Bear in mind that at 67 you will also get the state OAP, so another £100-£145 pw after tax.

    I was about to make the same point.

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Yes. I am 56 and I factor the state pension kicking in so your are really thinking about the next 10-12 years before you get quite a large chunk coming in on top

    Premier Icon windyg
    Free Member

    Lump sum and enjoy life, with it sat in an ISA or something to give a small return on & that you can just grab as you need it.

    Premier Icon dantsw13
    Free Member

    The lump sum is tax free (up to 25% of total pot) so a no brainer.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    Lump sum as the inevitable may come sooner than we hope.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Full Member

    On the other hand if your pension pot increases in value, that 25% tax free lump sum also increases in value. I have taken a lump sum but not up to the full 25%. How will it pan out ultimately? Who knows?

    Premier Icon poolman
    Free Member

    Brilliant choice to have. If it were me I would look at the ages of my parents, any known health issues in the blood line and whether 120k in today’s money would make any difference. That higher monthly pension is v tempting but up to you of course.

    Enjoy your retirement, I can’t wait.

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Full Member

    Still got a fair few years of working having not had spare money to put into a pension but just here to thank Surfer for his input about taking lump sum to limit tax liability 👍 although I doubt I’ll pass my personal allowance even with state pension ☹️

    Premier Icon jimw
    Free Member

    I had the similar decision to make four years ago, although the sums involved were considerably lower than your projections. With an actuarially reduced monthly income because I was taking it at 55 rather than 60 I calculated that if I live beyond 73 then I would be losing out compared to waiting, however for many reasons I decided to take it and the minimum allowable lump sum as the income was enough to top up my part time work (in a completely different field) and a substantial portion of the lump sum was very helpful with a project we were working on. I have no regrets at all.

    Premier Icon steveh
    Full Member

    Surely your 24 years assumption assumes that you spend all that 120k, invest or get return on none of it etc? As above though, you’re a long time dead get it done now.

    Premier Icon shinton
    Free Member

    Lump sum. I’m in a slightly different situation and just about to do a transfer from DB into a SIPP as my medical situation is a bit complicated. Not serious enough to stop me having a bloody good time for a few years as soon as we are able to and at least I can pass the dregs on.

    Premier Icon flicker
    Full Member

    In your position I’d take the lump sum.

    One way to look at it is that’s an extra 10k tax free per year ontop of your pension for the next 12 years and in 12 years time your state pension will kick in which is currently 9k ish per year. There’ll be a small hit with income tax when the state pension kicks in.

    Good luck and enjoy your retirement 👍

    Premier Icon bruneep
    Full Member

    OP are you fire service?

    I took lump sum with max commutation paid tax on this with a smaller annual pension. I worked out for me that best option.

    Tax on monthly pension took a while to sort as HMRC were under some impression that my lump sum was now my monthly pay 😁

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    @dickyboy 🙂

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
    Full Member

    i will be 79 before the higher monthly pension seems better.

    Bear in mind when you’re 79 will you actually need the extra from the higher pension? Take the lump sum now and enjoy while you can. You might just have to forgo a few packets of Werthers

    I’ve heard of too many lads at work finishing early and not lasting that long

    Are these they type who live to work? No outside interests so suddenly they have this big void.

    I’d drop work like a shot if I could.

    Premier Icon wobbliscott
    Full Member

    Most people in know these days seem to be taking the lot and self investing. That way when you die you have the whole pension pot to leave in your will and you can front end load the pension pot more than limitations on lump sums…whats the point in having a decent income when you’re a 90 year old senile dribbling mess in the corner of a nursing home? You want it front end loaded to enjoy while you’re still young and fit enough to do so. So think that is where I’ll be when the time comes. But if I were to take the pension then yes, I’d max out on lump sum….but of course always take professional financial advice!

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
    Full Member

    Tax on monthly pension took a while to sort as HMRC were under some impression that my lump sum was now my monthly pay 😁

    That’s quite common- think I’ve seen advice that suggests you take a small amount out first to prevent HMRC getting all grabby.

    Premier Icon oikeith
    Full Member

    Lump Sum all the way.

    I’m 20 years behind you but have opted to stay in a more expensive pension scheme because it allows retirement at 55 where as its replacement scheme did was state age.

    Premier Icon tlr
    Full Member

    Lump sum 100%.

    You are still at liberty to invest it back into the same funds your pension is in, or any other funds so you don’t miss out on growth. But you have access to the cash if you need it.

    Plus, what happens to your pension if you die unexpectedly? Dependants normally get a percentage of a direct benefit pension but would get 100% of the lump sum if you had taken it it.

    Premier Icon brads
    Free Member

    Lump sum. I transferred my DB pension into a SIPP to allow me to take a bigger lump sum when I go at 55.

    Better to spend more when you are younger than have too much when you are older.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    24 years crossover point I would take the lump

    i am retiring at 60 in a few weeks ( on a much smaller pension) I get an option of a small lump and a bigger monthly pension or a big lump and a smaller monthly pension. the crossover point is 16 years so i went for the big monthly amount small lump

    Premier Icon big_n_daft
    Free Member

    If you go at 55 keep an eye on your NI payments, keep them topped up until you have the requisite years for full state pension

    Premier Icon jimw
    Free Member

    If you go at 55 keep an eye on your NI payments, keep them topped up until you have the requisite years for full state pension

    +1. I have been doing so as registered self employed with HMRC with my part time job. Easy to do during self assessment. I need three more years contributions for full amount (unless they change the qualifying years , again)

    Premier Icon breninbeener
    Free Member

    all, thanks for your input.

    It seems like the lump sum is the way to go

    I will take some advice about putting it in ISA with the option to get hold of it for fun

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    I’d pay a lump sum to retire at 55!!!

    Premier Icon iainc
    Full Member

    i was offered a slightly smaller lump sum on mine as will be 55 next month, however I won’t be retiring for probably another 5 yrs plus. It is attractive though tax hammering appears significant, and ongoing contribution level would be held down significantly..

    Premier Icon poolman
    Free Member

    Good point ‘re maxing out state pension via voluntary contributions. I do that and am currently just 2 short.

    I think someone on here posted the payback of each year a while ago, I think the last gap year I bought was c 700 for an uplift of c 225pa, so only 3 years of pension you get your money back.

    Sorry may be wrong on actual numbers but it’s deffo less than 5 year payback.

    Premier Icon patagonian
    Full Member

    Just going through the same process as the OP and already consulted two pension advisors, they both said the same……go for the big lump sum rather than the higher monthly payments.
    Next question is what to do with it as returns are so poor currently but realistically not that many options.

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