Replacement turbo cost on 2007 Honda CRV…

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 41 total)
  • Replacement turbo cost on 2007 Honda CRV…
  • …just been quoted £1400.

    Is that in the ball park for this sort of thing, or expensive.

    This is for an exchange recon unit.

    johndoh
    Member

    Sounds about right for a replacement turbo.

    Rockhopper
    Member

    Is that just the turbo or is it drive in/drive out? Why did it fail? Make sure oil feed pipes are changed as well.

    Vanes are knackered leading to overboost.

    Price includes genuine Honda oil feed pipes and x2 oil changes – one when first done and another after 500 miles.

    I don’t even like the ruddy car!

    coppice
    Member

    I’ve just ordered turbo feed pipes for my van but will be swapping just the CHRA assembly when the time comes. Prices range from 50-160 but its a little more labour intensive.

    ETA: May not help if its the vanes

    bigyinn
    Member

    How much is a 12 YO CRV worth?

    4k ish

    Only done 78,000 miles which according to my garage is probably the reason they’ve failed. It’s been driven too steadily.

    I only bought it 2 months ago and private sale so no comeback.

    It has a lovely full service history though!

    It works fine under normal driving, but tram it up a steep hill and it goes into limp mode.

    Premier Icon finishthat
    Subscriber

    sounds expensive to me , i would get some more quotes

    Premier Icon bruneep
    Subscriber

    see how much the parts are on eBay and go back to garage to demand they do it cheaper

    cezza168
    Member

    Most likely the vanes are sticking open as a result of being covered in oil that has seeped past the bearings in the turbo and is now burnt on. In lots of cases the existing unit can be cleaned and rebuilt with new bearings for a lower price than replacing with new.

    If the fault is very intermittent get cheap ODB2 reader and some software for your phone and reset the fault yourself.

    Cezza

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    It works fine under normal driving, but tram it up a steep hill and it goes into limp mode.

    My Passat used to do that. I just didn’t boot it up steep hills and then I sold it.

    bear-uk
    Member

    Trade it in and get something you like. It will probably end up in an auction anyway.

    bear-uk
    Member

    Forgot to say, my last car decided to dump its engine oil into the exhaust system. A balanced centre section was around £100 from the bay. It is time consuming making sure all is OK.

    ross980
    Member

    What’s it’s worth on webuyanycar? Worth cutting your losses?

    Premier Icon slackalice
    Subscriber

    see how much the parts are on eBay and go back to garage to demand they do it cheaper

    Seriously? Aside from the ‘service companies exist to not make a profit’ mentality, what value do you place on your professional field of experience and knowledge?

    There will always be cheaper alternatives on ebay, I would imagine the hourly rate the garage might and could charge for one of their people to trawl through the internet seeking a decent ‘buy it now’ price might not be as much as the saving suggests. And what assurances are there for warranty issues?

    Alternatively, the customer buys the parts cheaper online and hands them to the mechanic, who may well charge you more for their labour because not all the required bits are there and they’ve been denied making a profit on the supplied parts, for which they’ll provide a more useful warranty.

    Apart from that, blinding suggestion! 😉

    There are always exceptions… cue the exceptions…

    trail_rat
    Member

    To be fair he’s joking at the outrage of last night where the guy spent 150 quid at a garage for same day fitment of garage sourced parts.

    Then moaned because he saw the same part number for 35 quid on eBay.

    Premier Icon bruneep
    Subscriber

    @slackalice

    see how much the parts are on eBay and go back to garage to demand they do it cheaper

    Seriously?

    Aye seriously……
    https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/overcharged-in-hindsight-any-refund-options/

    Premier Icon slackalice
    Subscriber

    Oops! I missed that one, apologies @bruneep.

    Inbred456
    Member

    From experience with a Mondeo that did exactly the same thing as yours. It was the injectors. They couldn’t provide enough fuel under load and the management system would trip into limp mode to prevent the engine running lean. Just make sure it’s the turbo.

    bsims
    Member

    Try TurboTechnics in Northampton, they do exchange by courier if you are not close. I got a remanufactured turbo with updated bearings for around £600 fitted. It has lasted almost as long as the original except it isn’t mak8ng the noises the original did at the Same mileage.

    Thanks folks.

    Took it to another garage for a second opinion yesterday and they quoted between £700 and £900 so a bit more bearable.

    They also suggested first trying a cleaner fluid that is fed directly into the turbo while running. This would only be £40 so worth a go!

    Premier Icon jamj1974
    Subscriber

    Price sounds fair. We had to replace the turbo on my wife’s car about 10 years ago. It cost us around £1k then.

    alanl
    Member

    see how much the parts are on eBay and go back to garage to demand they do it cheaper

    No, get it done at the quoted price, then look at the parts on ebay and ask for a refund.

    trumpton
    Member

    Can you buy the parts reconditioned and get a local garage to fit them.Sounds like you could save money this way. I would have thought you could half that quote. Might as well suck the price up and get it fixed rather than scrap it which would seem a shame if the rest of a car is good. Just do not go to a main dealer whatever you do.

    Premier Icon lesgrandepotato
    Subscriber

    If you supply the parts you are taking the risk if they are faulty… I do some work on a supply and fit basis, and some on a diagnose and fix basis.
    This works for me and the garage, you mileage may vary.
    FWIW I drive and older Alfa so parts hunting is essential.

    There is a whole industry out there that refurbishes turbo’s and building hybrid upgraded turbos for the aftermarket modification market for those who want to make ‘more progress’, so you can probably get it refurbished for less. No idea. Turbo’s are pretty simple devices, only one moving part, so no much labour time to strip and rebuild for someone who’s done it before and familiar with the process – I bet you could do it in well under an hour if you have the tools and experience and the cost of a new impeller won’t be much. Not suggesting you do it yourself (though easily a DIY job should you fancy it), but just suggesting you might not need to go down the replacement route. Maybe ring around some of the aftermarket companies to suss out where you might be able to get it refurbished?

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    It depends a lot on teh car tbh. Like, I put a new core in my Legacy. It cost me about £250, maybe £300 all in inc a decent Mellett core and a gasket set, and I’d have had it done in an afternoon except that I sneaked out for a ride halfway through and broke my wrist 🙂 Most of the hassle was getting the heatshield off as it was fitted with about 300 bolts and 299 of them were tucked away and hard to access.

    My mondeo was about the same in cost, but took longer as the bastard thing was right behind the engine and the access was poor, also it was an in-manifold deal so it wasn’t just turbo off, the entire manifold came off and that’s just awkward.

    Fitting a new core is pretty easy. It sounds scary but it’s a real meccano job, as long as the old one was intact.

    It’s different if the turbo’s gone totally expansive though as it might have taken lumps out of the housing, and filled the engine and sump with bits. But for something like this, or if you catch a worn turbo when it’s just floppy and not explodey, then it’s really not that big a deal.

    UNLESS, Honda have put yours somewhere horrific.

    Spray cleaners are crap, I say this from experience. You would need to get the manifold or exhaust off to spray the vanes directly and by the time you have done that you may as well take the whole thing off and do it properly.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    It’s pretty common with the mondeo variable vane turbo for people to drill through the turbo casing then spray oven cleaner into the vanes to unstick them. This has always struck me as insane, but, who knows.

    Premier Icon finishthat
    Subscriber

    Adding variable vanes to a turbo turns a one moving part component into a 40 moving part component ,
    they gum up if under exercised , they can be cleaned/refurbed but only if not damaged , they need taking off to do a proper job of course , access and difficulty of removal vary between 1/2 hour and
    the Range Rover body off joke. OP on the right track to get more quotes and getting more sensible ones, the refurbed unit would always cost more as they have so many moving parts.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    They also suggested first trying a cleaner fluid that is fed directly into the turbo while running. This would only be £40 so worth a go!

    I’d suggest this first, the kind you spray into the intake. Then if that doesn’t work, remove it and clean it up with a brush. If you don’t fancy that get a garage to remove it, send or take it to a turbo specialist then refit. Should come in much less than £700 still.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Have you tried Manx engines down at little Eaton or even my mate brad at belper?

    I’d suggest this first, the kind you spray into the intake. Then if that doesn’t work,

    Which it won’t.

    Why?

    They are all highly flammable and happily combust in the combustion chamber before they even see the turbo where it matters. You are essentially burning money, I’m not convinced they do anything other than raise the EGT’s to burn minor deposits off and after using them on my Civic I was never any further forward. Sticky vanes, sticky EGR, eventually sold for scrap value.

    Get some carb cleaner on directly and it will happily munch through all the crap on there but you need to get the turbo out first.

    LOL – to top things off someone ran into the back of me last night! 🙂

    No-one hurt and visually not much damage to my car, but the towbar took the brunt of the impact. Other chaps little Suzuki will be a write-off though.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Heh.

    Responding to squirrelking: You might be right re spray-in turbo cleaners, I don’t know. I tried one once and it produced massive clouds of weirdly fragrant white smoke so clearly something was making it through the combustion chamber and out of the exhaust.

    Get some carb cleaner on directly and it will happily munch through all the crap on there but you need to get the turbo out first.

    You might be able to reach down (or up, from underneath) to the turbo and operate the actuator by hand to gain some insight. I suspected sticky vanes a while ago but then the actuator moved freely with firm clicking and no stickiness or gumminess evident. It is quite a stiff spring but it is movable by hand.

    trail_rat
    Member

    You might be able to reach down (or up, from underneath) to the turbo and operate the actuator by hand to gain some insight. I suspected sticky vanes a while ago but then the actuator moved freely with firm clicking and no stickiness or gumminess evident. It is quite a stiff spring but it is movable by hand.

    How did doing that remove fears of sticky vanes ?

    sepultura
    Member

    What’s it’s worth on webuyanycar?

    Not £4K.

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    OP, if someone whacked into the towbar, they may have crumpled whatever it’s attached to behind the bumper. You’d best get it properly checked.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    How did doing that remove fears of sticky vanes ?

    Bit of confidence that it wasn’t sticky.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 41 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.