Rear shock tight in mount?

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  • Rear shock tight in mount?
  • stmachreth
    Member

    Just reinstalling the rear shock after servicing the fun bits. When I get anywhere near the specified torque at the front mount it gets really tight and the shock doesn’t hang down, but is held up. I can’t remember whether this was the case when I took it apart.

    Should there be more freedom of pivotness than this?
    It’s a Rocket 275, if it’s a specific issue

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Subscriber

    Gut instinct, yes it should be able to move more than that. Certainly does on my fs.

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    If it’s a du Bush your using the there’s plenty enough friction to hold a shock up. It would be normal. If you want it to run freely you need some sort of bearing in there, either a needle roller or bearing mount shock even better (but that’s something that must be designed for up front)

    stmachreth
    Member

    Thanks for the input. The shock doesn’t pivot very much on compression anyway and was fairly easy to move by hand, can’t imagine a great deal of wear will occur so long as I keep it greased.

    Premier Icon johnw1984
    Subscriber

    I’m sure I read somewhere that you don’t grease du bushings? Might be wrong though.

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Subscriber

    This I do know.Lol

    You don’t lube du bushings as said above.👍

    oreetmon
    Member

    I had this on a new 2012 Orange5 frame, used theses to good effect.

    Need a regular service in winter though

    https://www.enduroforkseals.com/products/rear-suspension/shock-eyelet-bearing-kits/6mm-8mm-thru-bolts/NEEDLE-BEARING-22.20.html

    stmachreth
    Member

    DU bushing? I don’t think it is, it’s brass or bronze or something. Unless that’s what a DU bushing is, in which case I should probably get the iso alcohol out.

    BearBack
    Member

    You wont get much rotation at that front shock mount.. so needle bearings are pointless here.
    I’d certainly explore needles on the swingarm end if you are a really light rider though or super sensitive to stiction.
    tolerance is a factor here, even with the lowest friction bearings/bushings, you could still bind things up if your end reducers are being forced against the shock eyelet when tightening.

    stmachreth
    Member

    I’m not light by any stretch. There’s not a great deal of movement at the swingarm end either.
    I’ll try again getting in touch with Cotic to see what they say. Seems a bit tight, but not sure what’s changed if anything.

    Going Woody’s again in a couple of weeks, that’ll show up any faults 🙂

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

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