Rear lights

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  • Rear lights
  • mildred
    Member

    Please can someone recommend me a decent rear light that doesn’t cost the earth. I’m sick of plastic push together crap with weak brackets that either crack or don’t stay in position. Something aluminium, bright screw together etc. With a proper metal mount. Does such a thing exist? There seems to be loads of front lights that’ll light up a stadium and seem to last forever, but rears seem a bit scarce.

    Aldi had a great one in the other day.
    Was about £8.
    Spotty dog IMHO.

    Was riding behind a mate last week who had Lezyne Micro Drive rear light. It was an impressively bright light even from quite a distance. The mount is plastic rather than metal but having borrowed the light for the rest of the ride home it seems pretty solid.

    DT78
    Member

    I’m using a lezyne zecto, flash flare and chill fibre flare. Pleased with all of them…think they can all be had for £25-50.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/mobile/cateye-tl-ld1100-10-led-with-battery/rp-prod64508

    Bought this recently – very bright and seems pretty sturdy.

    Just seen you want metal – ignore above then. It’s plastic.

    otsdr
    Member

    I have an Exposure Blaze, but it has a plastic mount. The light itself looks sturdy enough (as does the mount).

    One of the few rear lights with a metal mount is Hope District, but the external power pack kind of ruins it IMO.

    l.e. Sparse post light also: http://sparse.cc/intl/fixed-light-system
    l.l.e And Blink/Steady: https://www.missionbicycle.com/store/blinksteady-light

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    The £8.99 Aldi one is great.

    I ran a Flare but was unreliable, other Exposure lights are now better.

    Currently running a SeeSense rear light. More complicated than it needs to be but even the dimmest one is a cracking light.

    STATO
    Member

    For commuting? Do as the dutch do.

    I use the dynamo version, with one of these to mount off the brake bridge.

    Premier Icon ianbradbury
    Subscriber

    I thought the great thing about the Netherlands was all the separated infrastructure keeping cyclists safe from the cars? Why then should I think that a light used by the Dutch is a good idea for riding on roads not separated from cars?

    Personal preference is the Lupine Rotlicht – metal body, replaceable (and so far very secure) rubber band, lots of power settings, so you can, if you wish, run it dim, but also enough power to get noticed at twilight.

    I bought an RSP Astrum the other day – seems well made and the button is in a really handy place. burns your eyeballs out and although the bracket is plastic, seems plenty sturdy enough. Can be had for a tenner even though my rip-off LBS charges double that

    STATO
    Member

    I thought the great thing about the Netherlands was all the separated infrastructure keeping cyclists safe from the cars? Why then should I think that a light used by the Dutch is a good idea for riding on roads not separated from cars?

    As separated as they are, they are alnogside the roads and cycles have right of way at junctions, so quality lights are required to prevent cars turning across. Besides, its not just dutch, these are made by Germans to their road standards and while they have cycle paths they do also use the roads. Blinding power is not the answer, smart design so car can see you (and judge your position/distance) is better.

    Before LineTec cars approaching a bicycle from behind could only see a single rear light spot without being able to judge the distance very accurately. To judge distance the human eye requires spacial relation – especially in ‘spaceless’ darkness. B&Ms light with the LineTec light strip emit ‘spatial’ light. With LineTec other road users can estimate the distance to a cyclist much more accurately.

    I notice overtaking drivers giving more space when using this, over the exposure lights on my other commute bike.

    Premier Icon turboferret
    Subscriber

    The Blinksteady is a lovely bit of kit, albeit at a price.

    Cheers, Rich

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I don’t think you need a metal mount tbh (with seatpost size varying, metal mounts aren’t so common). A good plastic one works a charm even with a big light like the cateye grenade. (I don’t like light brackets that are just clicky but if there’s a screw or thumbscrew I can usually get them so that they just go nowhere)

    I like multiple lights rather than 1 really good light, redundancy for flat batteries is good and spreading them out has got to be more visible. And it gives you more options for flash/steady, and for bright vs big.

    Premier Icon Del
    Subscriber

    have used two of these for about 8 years now. aa batteries, and the end cap unscrews, so it has a nice, wide seal. one lives on my MTB pack all year round and gets sprayed with everything the local hills can fire at it.

    Premier Icon nemesis
    Subscriber

    Smart Lunar R2.

    It doesn’t meet most of your requirements ( aluminium, bright, screw together etc. With a proper metal mount ) but it does do what I think you actually want which is be bright and not break/be reliable.

    http://www.sigmasport.co.uk/item/Smart/Lunar-R2-USB-Rechargeable-Rear-Light-2-x-1-2-Watt/4BDH?gclid=Cj0KEQjwqZKxBRDBkNmLt9DejNgBEiQAq8XWPh6gk-GnY93HuwN9hyiX1MYxQW60WxYWqVLLt1nl-AkaAsHu8P8HAQ

    I’ve had mine for several years now, switched between bikes, ridden in all weathers and it works as well now as when it was new. It is pretty much all plastic though.

    loddrik
    Member

    I’ll also say the Smart Lunar R2. I asked the same question on here and it was recommended to me. I bought one for about a tenner and it is a brilliant light, regardless of price. That fact it was so cheap is an extra bonus. Seriously bright.

    jimjam
    Member

    Knog Blinder 4 is excellent. Although if you’ve got a big 34.9+ seatpost the strap will probably split. All rubber and plastic, USB rechargeable.

    I think there is a company that make fancy machined billet rear lights but they appeared to be cheap shitty lights in a fancy body for the more money than sense brigade.

    loddrik
    Member

    I have a knog blinder 4. It’s in a box as it has been for the last year. The silicone strap broke and I have no way of repairing it. The Lunar R2 is much better IMO. If anyone can repair the Knog they can have it for a fiver plus postage…

    jimjam
    Member

    loddrik – Member

    I have a knog blinder 4. It’s in a box as it has been for the last year. The silicone strap broke and I have no way of repairing it. The Lunar R2 is much better IMO. If anyone can repair the Knog they can have it for a fiver plus postage…

    Well, first off they have a two year warranty. So you could warranty it? But if you can’t be arsed I’ll take it.

    loddrik
    Member

    Or just on the whole hog…

    whitestone
    Member

    +1 to what Northwind says. Redundancy (in the engineering term) is good as you aren’t likely to notice a rear light failing.

    If you are commuting then the (expensive) ideal is a dynamo setup. Short of that, any of the small LED lights will be fine. I’ve a Moon Ring – http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Moon-Ring-Rechargeable-Rear-Light-25-Lumens_84416.htm which is USB rechargeable and uses a rubber strap style mount so can fit to seat post or a bag handle.

    Premier Icon JAG
    Subscriber

    I agree with Northwind and whitestone and ride with at least two different rear lights.

    Currently on my bike is a cat-eye light HERE All plastic but bright, takes AAA batteries and plenty of different flashing modes.

    My other light has just packed up (water ingress) so I just bought an RSP Astrum. Hasn’t arrived yet so no feedback – Sorry.

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    Bought this recently – very bright and seems pretty sturdy.

    Just seen you want metal – ignore above then. It’s plastic.

    I’ve had one of these for years and it’s still going strong, brackets are robust but even then Cateye spares are readily available and reasonably priced.

    Premier Icon leftyboy
    Member

    I have a Hope District which is heavy, has an external battery but is incredibly bright.

    I use it on the road bike as I really want to be seen on the road but it’s way to bright if anyone’s following you so I don’t use it off road.

    Been really pleased with this. Plastic again, but feels very solid, good rubber clicky switch, solid mounting. Cheap

    Light

    matt_bl
    Member

    On a couple of work commutes I’ve noticed a chap on a road/cx bike with lights which, for want of a better word, throb!

    There is a constant red light, but there is also a flash, over the course of a couple of seconds. The flash is much brighter than the steady light.

    Anyone have an idea what these are, they seem really visible.

    Thanks Matt

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    The Cateye 1100 has two independent strips of LED’s so you can set one to flash and one constant (as well as a couple of other modes). It also has an LED in each side.

    Premier Icon ianbradbury
    Subscriber

    On a couple of work commutes I’ve noticed a chap on a road/cx bike with lights which, for want of a better word, throb!

    There is a constant red light, but there is also a flash, over the course of a couple of seconds. The flash is much brighter than the steady light.

    Anyone have an idea what these are, they seem really visible.

    Thanks Matt

    I think quite a few do that – I know the Rotlicht does. Not sure how useful it really is – all the theorists ( German light enthusiasts) seem to say that only steady lights are useful/necessary. I don’t drive, and don’t see enough other cyclists to be sure – something like this is surely eye-catching, but does it actually help safety?

    uwe-r
    Member

    muppetWrangler – Member
    Was riding behind a mate last week who had Lezyne Micro Drive rear light. It was an impressively bright light even from quite a distance. The mount is plastic rather than metal but having borrowed the light for the rest of the ride home it seems pretty solid.

    I picked up a new set of these in the summer on ebay for £25! Bargain at that price but there are a few issues so at full rrp of £75 I’m not sure.

    The issues are’ the cap is plastic that screws in to the alloy case and it is clearly not very strong, I am careful when reassembling as a cross thread or over tightening would be easily done and already suspect it ain’t going to last forever. It’s also fiddly to fit in a USB socket to recharge.

    On the pro side, Its great when on the bike. Clamp seems strong, the light is bright with enough burn time to last a week of commuting.

    Premier Icon nemesis
    Subscriber

    The Smart R2 I linked above has a ‘random’ mode which is sort of like that and that’s the mode I use – it ‘throbs’ on and off a bit, then has a fit of short bursts, etc – basically it’s not regular so it draws the attention.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    The logic used to be that flashing lights are easier to spot but that solid lights are easier to judge speed and distance. And similiar with intensity, small intense lights are very eyecatching but wider lights are more… uh, usefully visible, I suppose? Seems sensible to me.

    Some folk seem to be obsessed with which is better, I figure if both approaches work differently then use both.

    If you have a pannier rack, get an adapter to mount whatever you buy on the back of it.

    Moon Shield for me. Super bright, nice mounts and USB charging and the battery life is impressive.

    cheekyget
    Member

    Ok these ain’t cheap…but in the long run!!!!!
    Exposure flare…..I know £40ish
    But hear me out…I got these, then after a year and 8months it wouldn’t charge properly…..so I contacted exposure, within a day I got a reply saying …send it back to us for repair.
    Little did I know these lights come with a 2year warranty !! And I got sent back a replacement light ..free!!
    I thanked them for their prompt service and asked how long is the warranty for the new light and my reply was
    Another 2 years!!……how cool is that

    Premier Icon snownrock
    Subscriber

    Just ebay “usb rear bike light” and get a couple of the Lezyne Zecto/Moon Comet Chinese knock off’s. About £4 each on the slow boat from China or £7 from UK. They are cheap enough to have a few of the different types, allowing redundancy when on a ride.

    They are super bright, USB rechargeable, simple, and quick to use on the universal rubber mount.

    As they are cheap not to worry too much if they break/fall off/get nicked.

    Premier Icon benp1
    Subscriber

    The USB version of the Smart R2 doesn’t have the random feature, only the battery version. I have both. In fact I’ve not been blown away with my USB version, the button is pants

    But it fits nicely on the back of my rack pack so I keep it there

    I have 3 other lights I use on the back so it’s a backup of a backup

    Premier Icon debaser
    Subscriber

    Just had some little Alpkit Tau lights arrive in the post.

    Will primarily use them as secondary lights for winter commuting, but they look like ideal low weight backup lights for the rest of the year too. USB chargeable and not easy to switch on by accident as they rattle around in your bag, which is a definite plus.

    Look good out of the box. I’ll maybe post a wee review once I’ve used them for a few weeks.

    Pieface
    Member

    Will those Tau lights fit readily to a helmet? Are there hooks on both sides of the LED body?

    Premier Icon debaser
    Subscriber

    Will those Tau lights fit readily to a helmet? Are there hooks on both sides of the LED body?

    Aye, hooks on both sides and two lengths of rubber band so should fit most helmets one way or another. Worked on a Giro Hex and Kali Summatorother I tried a moment ago. At 22 grams you’re not really going to notice the extra weight.

    Great wee lights from what I’ve seen so far. Very good visibility even on the low modes and the med/high will be great for being seen on dark wet winter days. I didn’t bother switching on my main light on the way home the front light illuminated the way (unlit path/track) pretty well for something so tiny.

    craigxxl
    Member

    As a driver passing many cyclists on my commute the best rear lights that get you noticed from the longest distance in all conditions including low winter sun is the Exposure TraceR. I was that impressed with their performance I bought one for myself. It has a plastic bracket but it is very strong.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 40 total)

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