Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 203 total)
  • Realising gravel bike are bit shit !
  • Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    If Die Hard with a Vengeance was remade for the modern era, John McClane wouldn’t be told to go round a black neighbourhood wearing a racist sign, he’d be told to come on STW and slag off gravel bikes…

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Love mine at the moment.

    It’s all I’m using.

    The cross over from a road bike is correct.

    Flared drops just made it for me

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
    Full Member

    I have several bikes. The two most grin inducing, fastest, fun bikes are a rigid singlespeed, and a gravel bike. They are my ‘go to’ bikes for ‘natural’ singletrack, byways and bridleways. My full susser feels like an absolute energy sucking lazy sloth in comparison, but in its day it was quite a fast nimble ride/climber.

    The gravel and rigid singlespeed are quite close in disciplines, the gravel bike is just the obvious choice for any ride that involves big distances or anything with more than about 10 minutes of road riding, rigid mtb for whooping across fields at close to 40mph 🙂 (I’ve just entered the world of 29ers and can’t get my head around how much faster it rolls!)

    Premier Icon redstripe
    Free Member

    For years I have always ridden any bike I have had anywhere accepting the compromise of my or the bikes limits. I was cynical at the marketing blurb at first but caved in and got a Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc a couple of years back. It’s been a revelation, it really is a good compromise for the general type of riding where we are in the New Forest (lots of gravel tracks mixed with potholed road sections). I really like the brakes, wide range of gears, the comfort – maybe to do with the geometry, flared bars with thick tape and bigger WTB Riddler tyres. So not shit to me, perfect, but I guess it does depend on where you live and your type of regular riding as others have said.

    Premier Icon Waderider
    Free Member

    It’s just a marketing phrase for a type of bike that has always existed. As marketing scum bags are involved, they are currently over hyped. Sounds like you fell for the hype.

    I currently have two bikes for this type of riding. A ten year old Orange R8 with Project 2 forks, 26 inch wheels, drop bars, and front and rear racks, and a 18 year old Kaffenback with 700c wheels, drop bars, and the ability to take crosser tyres up to 32mm.

    I suspect I’ll still be riding both when sales and marketing have moved on from selling crossers with plus size tyres. Maybe they’ll move on to selling motorbikes with electric engines. Anything to keep consumerism and capitalism racing along.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    I will point out there’s plenty of gravel bike riders who push the idea that they can replace a mtb 🤔

    Strawriders? 😉

    Premier Icon chestrockwell
    Full Member

    I had one and have to agree with the OP. Fair enough, mine was not top of the range but it felt like a lump on the road and meh off it. Sold it and bought a HT, then sold that and got a road bike. Road bike makes sense in a way the gravel didn’t as a ying to the FS yang.

    For gravel mincing I have my retro bikes.

    I obviously still maintain an interest in buying another gravel bike because n+1.

    Premier Icon chestrockwell
    Full Member

    It’s just a marketing phrase for a type of bike that has always existed. As marketing scum bags are involved, they are currently over hyped. Sounds like you fell for the hype.

    Yeah, to be fair CX with drops was a thing 30 years ago.

    Premier Icon mariner
    Free Member

    Didn’t work for me so went back to a ht set up for bikepacking.
    Is it a tourer is it an mtb who knows but it’s a darn site more comfortable and utilitarian.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    I reckon my Arkose is more capable off-road than the MTBs I started out on in the early 90s.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    13thfloormonk
    not sure if you can really ride 150km of remote highland gravel ‘on the rivet’ the whole time, would get tiring…

    It can go from nice gravel to oh shit in seconds… 🙂

    Premier Icon stanfree
    Free Member

    I have a trek Slash , Giant Defy advanced and just got the bearings done on my Trek Superfly . Since Covid ive not any had any need to ride the slash but have used the superfly constantly. When my c2w comes round in August I had planned a gravel bike but beginning to wonder If I really need one. My plan was to sell the superfly but its been a blast the last few weeks and I know Id struggle to ride some of the stuff on a gravel bike.

    Will see what happens cant imagine there are much better than a heavy hardtail with drop bars.

    Premier Icon tomparkin
    Full Member

    I’m not really qualified to comment. But why let that spoil the fun?

    My BIL recently got a gravel bike which he let me have a quick go on the other week.

    Now granted it had SPD pedals on and I had normal shoes, so it was a bit sketchy.

    Other than that, it had a dropper and disc brakes, and a 1x gearing setup so was basically great. Pedalled really nicely. Then the bridleway headed downhill and then I noticed the riding position and the narrow bars.

    So, IDK, I guess it depends what you’re expecting. With proper pedals I can imagine one being great for whizzing around in a pedally sort of manner while coping with somewhat bumpy terrain. If you want to shred your local deathgnar woods it’s maybe not the best tool in the box.

    Premier Icon 13thfloormonk
    Full Member

    My plan was to sell the superfly but its been a blast the last few weeks

    Funny, it was my Superfly that got me hooked on the idea, stuck narrower bars and 38c tyres on it and started going further and faster. Did a couple of seasons CX on it too with CX tyres and even narrower chopped down bars.

    The Superfly could end up being my longer distance cruiser if my Kinesis turns out to be too much of a handful, would just keep the Kinesis for CX duties.

    Premier Icon onewheelgood
    Full Member

    I’ve got a few bikes, the gravel bike being the most recent acquisition. I don’t need it, but it’s certainly fun. It reminds me of when I was a teenager in the early 70s riding my Sun 5 speed racer off-road and breaking it – except that the gravel bike doesn’t break. It’s just as capable off-road as my 92 Eldridge Grade was, but much nicer on road. I’ll admit that is a bit slower on-road than I expected, but it’s very comfortable on the rubbish road surfaces we now have to put up with.

    Premier Icon lightfighter762
    Full Member

    nullmmmmmmmmm!

    Premier Icon downshep
    Full Member

    Had one since January (Tempest) and haven’t ridden anything else since. It’s the perfect join the dots bike, linking all those NCN / landy track / woodland path and tarmac sections together in a way that my hardtail can’t match and my road bike wouldn’t even consider. Perfect pandemic pootler.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    downshep
    …It’s the perfect join the dots bike, linking all those NCN / landy track / woodland path and tarmac sections together in a way that my hardtail can’t match and my road bike wouldn’t even consider.

    That sums it up nicely.

    If you’re wanting a fast bike, then there’s one for each of those categories, but none do it all as well.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    I’m sure for a lot of people, being a bit shit is part of the appeal- same as singlespeeds, fatbikes, rigids, cross bikes. These can do other things really well too of course but I’ve always liked to have at least one bike where instead of being me and the bike vs the trail, it’s me vs the bike and the trail

    Premier Icon continuity
    Free Member

    Try telling the blokes racing Strada bianche that you need 40c’s and a 67 degree HA to ride off tarmac.

    You’re just gullible consumers wanting to spend money and hoping that it will make you happy. If you had a MTB you’d ride it and enjoy it. If you had a road bike you’d go and ride it and enjoy it. The irony is that most of you crave a gravel bike because you were sold a 170/170 29er to ride the red route at dalby.

    Your enjoyment isn’t magnified by anything magical, titanium or niche and owning it doesn’t make you special.

    We are not for want of wonders, but want of wonder. Go get some CBT and spend the money on making memories when this all eases up.

    Premier Icon 13thfloormonk
    Full Member

    Try telling the blokes racing Strada bianche that you need 40c’s and a 67 degree HA to ride off tarmac.

    …you mean the trained professionals with full time mechanics following them in cars with spare bikes on the roof? Trained professionals who still finish the event looking utterly destroyed, assuming a puncture or mechanical hasn’t finished the event for them? Good example!

    Premier Icon FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    I see gravel bikes as

    Just another marketing excuse to create another segment.

    A reason for middle aged gnar MTB riders who have never had a road bike / CX bike to admit that they don’t need their 150mm gnar enduro bike because actually they only gnar riding they do is on a gravel track. (but now they can do it and be kool, and wear baggies)

    Christ knows how pro riders have ridden Paris-Roubaix for years on their flimsy road bikes, or some of us have ridden the 3 peaks on CX bikes.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    It’s really semantics. From my point of view gravel bikes are simply a return to the norm. Take any pre 1970s EU/UK sports/roadster bike and you have a bike that fits the multipurpose capabilities of the American gravel bike.

    It was a bike capable of getting you to where the countryside starts and to ride through it. In the UK it was the sort of bike favoured by the RSF set, and I suspect the UK idea of a gravel bike is more that than the USA version where there are tens of thousands of graded dirt roads.

    And a shout out for On-One for spotting the gap in the market because IMO the Pompino was a “gravel” bike before it became a trend (yes, I know about the Dawes Galaxy and others).

    There’s more to riding bikes in the mountains than heading downhill being gnar.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Christ knows how pro riders have ridden Paris-Roubaix for years on their flimsy road bikes, or some of us have ridden the 3 peaks on CX bikes.

    *Swoon*

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    And a shout out for On-One for spotting the gap in the market because IMO the Pompino was a “gravel” bike before it became a trend

    Did the Pompino pre-date the Kona Sutra?

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    I see gravel bikes as

    Just another marketing excuse to create another segment.

    Sort of, to a point, it’s just giving us another choice, and choice is great, what a time to be alive!.

    Does make me chuckle when folk on here slag off enduro riders as some kind of fashion victim, and don’t see their new found gravel bikes in the same light… 🙂

    Premier Icon hooli
    Free Member

    Mine makes a great winter bike when the trails are too boggy to ride.

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    Try telling the blokes racing Strada bianche that you need 40c’s and a 67 degree HA to ride off tarmac.

    Strada B is hardly the mtb trails the OP mentioned though is it? It’s more like a long lumpy disused rail way turned into a bike path than you can even ride a road bike on…..oh wait, that is what they are riding.

    Premier Icon Nick
    Full Member

    I bought a Salsa Fargo from Charlie in 2011, I bought it because I was into bikepacking and thought it would be ideal, this was “back in the day” before we called it gravel riding, monster cross was the genre I suppose.

    People pointed and laughed at me, especially my riding buddies, but now they all have gravel bikes with skinner tyres than my Fargo and are therefore slower off road.

    As it turns out I did 2 or 3 Welsh Ride Things on the Fargo and realised that my Trance would make bombing down lakeland passes more fun, and it doesn’t really matter what bike you are dragging across a welsh bog.

    But I still love my Fargo, it’s easily the most versatile bike I own and really fast in the right conditions, really comfortable and capable, just avoid sustained rock gardens and really steep stuff and it’ll pretty much ride anything I’m capable of, it will be the bike I still own into my old age when all my bottle has gone and I just want to pootle around or tour.

    Currently it is on my turbo, but I’ll get a cheap road bike and liberate it again soon.

    Premier Icon continuity
    Free Member

    Riders finish Strada bianche done for because they’ve just raced a world tour one day classic. They look worse at the end of liege Bastogne liege; your 43c tyres would just have them finishing slower.

    And the OP already established that he’d have more fun on a mountain bike as soon as it gets anywhere technical. I don’t really see your point – the segment is about selling you on the need to buy something new to satisfy an internal paucity, not filling it with experiences.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    scotroutes
    Did the Pompino pre-date the Kona Sutra?

    No idea, but I’m pretty sure it was in a completely different price bracket in the UK market.

    Premier Icon dudeofdoom
    Full Member

    It’s really semantics. From my point of view gravel bikes are simply a return to the norm. Take any pre 1970s EU/UK sports/roadster bike and you have a bike that fits the multipurpose capabilities of the American gravel bike.

    I’m sorta with Epi on this, everything started to go more niche once bikes went more recreational so the gravel is just a return to something more general purpose as it’ll take a variety of tyre/wheel sizes and fulfill more roles.

    Premier Icon kerley
    Free Member

    My rides are typically 40% road, 55% gravel and 5% single track. They are perfect for a gravel bike and a gravel bike make the most sense (I don’t ride a gravel bike but it still makes most sense on paper)

    The whole ride is a compromise so any bike chosen is a compromise. Just pick the bike you like riding the most and get on with it (in my case a 28c tyres fixed gear)

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    And the OP already established that he’d have more fun on a mountain bike as soon as it gets anywhere technical

    Well that depends on how you’re getting to the technical bits. Which is the point you seem determined to miss.

    Premier Icon montgomery
    Free Member

    I cobbled together the Lockdown Lava Dome at the end of February. I didn’t want to spend much money, and I have no interest in n+1 (one mountain bike, one road bike, that’s it). The bike has been a bit of a revelation and, if I was in the market for a new bike, it’d be something from the burlier end of the gravel spectrum. It would, note, be replacing the road bike, not the mountain bike…

    Premier Icon samcheese
    Free Member

    Around Cardiff trails are quite rocky mostly, so much as I’d like a gravel bike it’s a non-starter because I like going fast.

    This is a reflection on your riding, not the trails around Cardiff.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    Christ knows how pro riders have ridden Paris-Roubaix for years on their flimsy road bikes,

    In serious discomfort, that’s how.

    I have no idea what the problem is here. We now have more choice than ever, which means you can get a better bike for what you want to do.

    I have no idea why people are bitching about that on the internet. Everything that any company makes is subject to marketing, nit just gravel bikes. And you don’t have to buy the thing that is marketed. That’s under your control, not theirs. If you want to ride trails in a road bike or road on an MTB, go right ahead.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    This is a reflection on your riding, not the trails around Cardiff.

    It’s both.

    Premier Icon stumpy01
    Full Member

    Mis-sold rubbish in my opinion.

    I tried to spread mine on the driveway & it didn’t work at all!

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Full Member

    This place confuses me sometimes. I can’t understand why anybody would deem any bike shit just because it doesn’t suit their needs, but nor can I understand why bike owners get so defensive. If my “gravel” bike doesn’t suit you that’s fine by me.

    Personally mine was never meant to replace my MTB and if it wasn’t for lockdown I’d be riding the MTB in remote(ish) bits of Scotland by now. But it has replaced my road bike, mainly because I’m old and slow anyway now, so might as well enjoy the comfort and the ability to explore those interesting looking tracks when the fancy takes me. But it’s just a bike. If you want something a bit more capable off road but a bit slower on road or something a bit faster on road but a bit slower off road you’ve got plenty of choices. Just pick one and (don’t) be a dick about it 🙂

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 203 total)

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