Rats, humane disposal of

Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)
  • Rats, humane disposal of
  • pondo
    Member

    We’ve long spotted brown rats occasionally bezzing round the bottom of the garden and that’s fine, they can do what they want down there. But over the last couple of days, we’ve seen one getting closer to the house – today it was on the bird feeder mebbe six feet from the house, and we just chased it off the patio with a broom. The bird feeder’s been there for yonks, all squirrel-proof and I think he’ll struggle to get food from it, but we really don’t want him busting into the house to see if we’ve left anything out (we never do). So – what do we do? Can you trap them? Leave poison? Train the foxes to catch them? Potshots with an air rifle? Any tips for humane rat removal gratefully received. 🙂

    joshvegas
    Member

    Wee nipper.

    Big variety.

    Kill it dead instantly.

    Its the only way to make sure.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    You can trap them, or poison them. Rat poison is a tricky business in a garden though, you need bait boxes that are dog and cat proof, and there’s always a risk of secondary poisoning to other critters that might eat the corpses.

    My preferred method is an air rifle, but you need the right kit and the right setup, plus the skillz to make each shot quick and humane.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    Get some poison and accept there are no nice ways to die.

    If you do get some of the humane traps bear in mind that the law is the same as it would be for a pet, it’s cruelty to avoid the problem and let it die of dehydration, starvation, drown it etc.

    My FIL has a walk in cage trap that capturers them alive and he then drives the caught rat out to a field somewhere and releases it. Apparently this is also cruel as the rat can’t survive without its family unit and it eventually starves to death if it can’t  find its way back to the nest.

    jonm81
    Member

    Our neighbour is whining about rats coming through the bottom of our garden from the nature reserve behind and into theirs to eat their dog food. Somehow this is my problem according to them.

    Anyhoo, I’m laying peanut butter and nutella mix as bait then shooting them with an air rifle just to get some peace and quiet. Only shoot them if you can consistantly hit a 10pence at 20m otherwise there is a good chance of injuring and not killing them instantly and that’s not very humane.

    TheDTs
    Member

    As recommended on here. Goodnature A24 rat trap.

    Sniff sniff kerpow, reset,  sniff sniff kerpow,  as the packaging describes

    Premier Icon bails
    Subscriber

    The problem with traps and poison is that you can’t really control what gets killed.

    The air rifle approach above is the most discriminating method, catch them in a cage trap first if you want to be less sporting but more certain of finishing the job without just injuring it.

    joshvegas
    Member

    The problem with traps and poison is that you can’t really control what gets killed.

    Make it a challenge where the rats intelligence leads it to its ultimate doom. And mr tibbles can’t be arsed.

    pondo
    Member

    Thanks folks, useful stuff – thinking humane trap and an air pistol. Not a cheery thought but can’t be having em in the house, hopefully it’s the least unpleasant for the little fellers.

    mooman
    Member

    air pistol not ideal – unlikely to get point blank even in a cage. Air rifle is best; .22 flat or hollow joint will kill it before its exited the opposite side. 

    Or get yourself a fen trap; those will fold a rat before he has heard it close.

    pondo
    Member

    Just Googled Fen Traps, there’s a rather grim YouTube vid. I’m not saying trapping and shooting will be a barrel of laughs for them, but that was pretty hideous, Wee Nipper a definite no-no. 🙁

    Electric capacitor traps.  Poison is theost effective but nasty. Spring traps are far more humane than live traps and trying to shoot them. They won’t smoke a last cigarette and stoically decline a blindfold.

    Premier Icon burko73
    Subscriber

    pitchfork and a spaniel also works.  you must have wellies, shorts and an old wax jacket on for effect when the wife comes home wondering why the dogs excited and you’ve got a pitchfork in your hand…

    submarined
    Member

    If you want humane, poison is categorically not the way to get rid. It kills by causing massive internal hemorrhage, and has been proven in a fair few studies to be very painful for the animal. Plus the risk of accidental and secondary poisoning.

    The sticky flypaper type traps are even worse. Vermin often chew off their own limbs to release themselves.

    We have chickens and back onto a load of fields, so our garden is basically a rattopia. We use snap traps which dispatch quickly and humanely by snapping necks. In 7 years I haven’t yet caught anything that isn’t a rat. (and we also have hedgehogs, stoat-y things, and various other beasts that frequently pop in to the garden to say hi.)

    However, they don’t control enough. I’m a total lefty hippy, but I have no issue dispatching pests and vermin as long as it’s quickly and painlessly. I’m going to try different traps in different places, as they seem to have got the hang of nicking the bait…

    My FIL has a walk in cage trap that capturers them alive and he then drives the caught rat out to a field somewhere and releases it.

    I’ve always been told that releasing something classed as a pest into the wild is illegal. It’s also IMHO a bit irresponsible, you’re just transferring the issue to someone else.

    rockchic
    Member

    Ourselves and neighbours have bird feeders out and these always attract the rats.

    My next door neighbour,an old army man,waits by his upstairs window ( not a book depository ) then dispatches them with an air rifle when they appear. We’ve now moved our bird feeders to a grass verge across the road to try and keep the rats away from the houses.

    Bunnyhop
    Member

    We have this problem.

    Many reasons why the rats are here, our bird feeders, we live near 2 canals, also the neighbour leaves her Macdonalds rubbish on the drive and sometimes rubbish in the back garden.

    Has anyone phoned the council to dispose of their rats?

    nbt
    Member

    I’ve always been told that releasing something classed as a pest into the wild is illegal

    https://www.gov.uk/pest-control-on-your-property

    It’s an offence to keep or release some wild animals, eg grey squirrels – you must kill them humanely if you catch them alive.

    no mention of rats, but I’d need to look at the actual legislation

    yeager2004
    Member

    Another vote for the electric traps. We bought one a good few years ago that was very effective.

    Rats are very cunning though – the advice I had was to leave the trap in place for a few days so it gets used it before bating and activating the trap. Also, rats prefer to not run across open areas, so the trap is best placed along a fence/side of shed/in undergrowth etc. rather than an open area.

    The only problem we had with the electronic trap was the one we had wasn’t water proof, so I leaving it outside (not in rain, just general damp weather) seems to have stopped it working.

    As an aside, speaking with a neighbour who’s a retired pest controller – he mentioned that the rats feast off all the bits dropped from the bird feeders. He advised not feeding the birds if we wanted to remain rat-free. This was a real shame as we used to get loads of fairly uncommon birds in the garden, but he’s right – since removing the feeder, no more sightings of rats.

    pondo
    Member

    Holy thread resurrection – the previous infestion was fixed by the council when called by the house two doors down, but the little blighters are back. Hoping to find a solution that doesn’t stop us feeding the birds – came home tonight to find Mr Rat trying to work his way through the squirrel-proof feeder… 🙁

    croe
    Member

    Why did they invent the robot lawn mower before the robot jack russell?

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    As recommended on here. Goodnature A24 rat trap.

    We got one of those, it’s taken out 12 of the bastard things in two months. Powered by a CO2 canister. Lures them in with chocolate-flavoured lure then stoves their skulls in with a gas-powered ram and re-sets ready for the next one. No bait or poison etc. Not cheap, but very effective and will take out 24 rodents per gas canister. Humane in the sense that it kills them pretty well instantly:

    http://goodnature.co.nz

    Where’s your feeder sited? Generally rats avoid going out into the open for fear of predation, they tend to move along walls and under cover where possible.

    pondo
    Member

    It’s near the hedgeline – rarely, we’ll see one sprint across the lawn, got a definite sight of one going behind the shed. So aiming to set baited traps in the narrow run behind the shed and along the hedgeline, just a bit worried about collateral damage in the hedge.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    If you can move the feeder away from the hedge it’ll be less attractive to them to start with, they don’t like being out in the open. If you can fit a tray to catch stray seeds that’ll help too.

    The A24 comes with detector things that they gnaw on to show you where they’re happy feeding, then you site the trap there – basically it’ll be somewhere they feel safe to stop and feed – then you set up the trap, let them get used to it and wait for it to kill them well dead.

    The A24’s designed to be safe for pets – the lure is rodent specific – and hedgehogs, but if you’re concerned, there’s an add-on cage you can use to make it difficult for them to access.

    http://collinsnets.co.uk/product-category/vermin-control/goodnature-traps?

    I stuck a small motion-triggered wireless cam on ours and nothing bar rats has gone near it. Not cheap, but ime does what it says on the can and with minimal maintenance.

    pondo
    Member

    I like – thanks for the advice. 🙂

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Have you considered putting posters on the sides of vans in order to create a hostile environment?

    philxx1975
    Member

    How about a nice bird of prey.

    pondo
    Member

    Did that, hasn’t worked. 🙁

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Subscriber

    A decent cat will kill rats for fun. Of course, finding a decent cat is the issue as most won’t be arsed to take on a rodent capable of ripping their face off if they get it wrong. A proper ratter though will lay in wait and dispatch rats as big as themselves with a single neck bite. Very impressive to see. Terriers obviously can kill them with ease, but you need to somehow contain the rats as it would be a good dog can catch one in open ground. Moving on from killing them, as a farm business we need to have an written policy for disposal of the corpses of dead rats. Believe it or not, the officially accepted method of disposal is to wrap in newspaper and place out with the bi-weekly black bag (landfill) rubbish.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Believe it or not, the officially accepted method of disposal is to wrap in newspaper and place out with the bi-weekly black bag (landfill) rubbish.

    Lots of schools used to have samples of different radio active material as part of their science apparatus so that you can demonstrate Geiger counters and such. There was a decision  made that maybe they shouldn’t that sort of thing in a school and a scheme was devised for disposal.

    The problem was lots of little bits of radio active material all round the country adds up to a lot in one place of you have any coordinated scheme to collect and dispose of it so a cunning plan was hatched…….

    Believe it or not, the officially accepted method of disposal is to wrap in newspaper and place out with the bi-weekly black bag (landfill) rubbish.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    A decent cat will kill rats for fun. Of course, finding a decent cat is the issue as most won’t be arsed to take on a rodent capable of ripping their face off if they get it wrong. A proper ratter though will lay in wait and dispatch rats as big as themselves with a single neck bite. Very impressive to see.

    I hear you. Next door’s cat is useless in the dilettante, feckless way you’d expect of a fairy princess that’s served sardines on demand on a silver platter. Enter a scruffy, off-black, scraggy sort of mog that had a quick sniff around then sat motionless on top of a wall for about ten minutes just watching and waiting. Quick twitch of the hind-quarters and a lightning dart into the long grass and it re-emerged with a rat hanging from its mouth before disappearing into the undergrowth.

    I suspect it was on secondment from the local farm. Meanwhile Princess Whiskers just sat there uselessly waiting for the next sardine alert. If I weren’t allergic to cats, I’d have offered it a job on the spot.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    I like – thanks for the advice. 🙂

    No worries. The A24 back story’s quite cool. Developed in NZ to try and protect indigenous wildlife from rats and other non-native predators. The idea is that you can install multiple traps across a wide area then leave them to get on with it. Once they’ve wiped out the local rat population, they just sit there waiting for any new arrivals.

    If you do get one, I’d buy an extra lure pouch at the same time. The idea is that you dot little dabs of the stuff around so the rats get used to eating it and see it as a safe, desirable food source.

Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.