Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 148 total)
  • Racism in Mountain Biking
  • oakleymuppet
    Free Member

    Living in South East asia for several years, I saw MTBs as more of a rich mans toy,(although becoming more popular in places), and dont forget, its damn hot mostly, so riding up mountains is a different story

    I saw more expensive roadbikes in a small area in Makati Manila than I’ve ever seen in London. The middle and upper classes in East Asia are a lot more outdoorsy than most people assume.

    Maybe you idiots should go and actually ask some BAME riders if you thought there were issues, tactfully of course, there are plenty of BAME riders round Sheffield so it’s not like they don’t exist.

    TheBrick
    Free Member

    Maybe you idiots

    Make a point not an insult it degrades any point you are trying to make.

    Try a listen. The podcast is primarily aimed at North America / Europe.

    oakleymuppet
    Free Member

    I like some of the points made in the podcast, I aimed that at some others.

    argee
    Full Member

    kelvin
    Full Member
    and it’s a wider grouping than just a colour

    “Let’s talk about white people as well”

    I’ll have a listen to the podcast…

    Posted 27 minutes ago

    I actually meant that as within the black demographic you have sub-groups, to just ask at the higher level may miss out on certain answers, i.e. groups who have been born and raised in the UK, groups who are first generation UK, groups who live in cities, etc, etc. It just seems if you want to work out why, you need to know the many inputs, otherwise all you’ll get is a generic answer to a generic question.

    brads
    Free Member

    Is a lack of representation automatically racism ? I don’t quite get that bit.

    There may be reasons for it, but is racism always the cause.?

    joepud
    Free Member

    Dyna-ti

    Is it ?.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Mountain_Bike_Championships

    Or MTB India.
    https://www.townscript.com/e/mtbh20

    I love that you posted a link to african mtb championships wiki. Just look at the race of all the people who have won the majority of them are white well done for proving your own point wrong. Im just gonna assume you haven’t even listened to the podcast.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    Anecdotally:

    There’s shedloads of Asian kids on bikes round here. It’s not that they aren’t riding, it’s that they’re riding differently from the MTBers. Trial bikes are hugely popular, you know the kind of thing where the top tube and the chainstay behind it is almost a straight line and the saddle is lower than the rear wheel. They* have taken over the local skate park and are busy getting big air on halfpipes, you don’t see many boarders in there any more.

    Of course, you could argue why aren’t they mountain biking? Do they feel excluded, or are they happy that they’ve found their own thing?

    (* – in anticipation of the Professionally Offended By Proxy turning up to point-score, by “they” here I mean trial bike riders.)

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    WOW Joe 😯

    You went through them all….looking for just this sort of thing to throw back as an example

    Not everybody Joe, but you confirm my point also, because mtb is flourishing worldwide.

    What do they say in China Joe ?, that blokes not ethnic Chinese ?. Stretch out a pathetic argument.

    Incidentally Joe, why haven’t you referenced the Indian championships 😕

    reluctantjumper
    Full Member

    Will give that a listen as I always found his podcasts good.

    There’s shedloads of Asian kids on bikes round here. It’s not that they aren’t riding, it’s that they’re riding differently from the MTBers. Trial bikes are hugely popular, you know the kind of thing where the top tube and the chainstay behind it is almost a straight line and the saddle is lower than the rear wheel. They* have taken over the local skate park and are busy getting big air on halfpipes, you don’t see many boarders in there any more.

    Similar in Cardiff except it’s more BMX and the Carrera Wheelie groups. Very rarely see them venture out of the skate parks or their local streets but they are out on bikes enjoying themselves.

    cloggy
    Full Member

    Some here have argued that as there isn’t racism within other countries MTB communitys so there isn’t racism within the British MTB community. That’s a fallacious argument and misconceived.

    joepud
    Free Member

    WOW Joe 😯

    You went through them all….looking for just this sort of thing to throw back as an example

    Not everybody Joe, but you confirm my point also, because mtb is flourishing worldwide.

    What do they say in China Joe ?, that blokes not ethnic Chinese ?. Stretch out a pathetic argument.

    Incidentally Joe, why haven’t you referenced the Indian championships 😕

    I didn’t go through them all half of them I knew and the others I just rolled over a name and saw a photo. I don’t understand what two links to an African and Indian bike series does to prove there isn’t any racism in cycling?

    I didn’t cite the Indian series because I didn’t need to when half the people that have won the African one are white so totally disproves what ever point you’re trying to make.

    Mountain biking maybe “flourishing worldwide” but we need to look at why socially and culturally uptake of this sport is so low for BAME people and its likely because of systemic racist structures within our society. I know its an uncomfortable topic and the idea of you thinking you could have racist thoughts isn’t nice but we need to recognise learn and correct them.

    I don’t expect you to get it, its a complex issue and I don’t fully get it either. Im just trying to educate myself and try and understand other peoples experiences.

    Jordan
    Full Member

    I’ve never noticed any racism in mountain biking. A lack of representation maybe but not racism, having said that I have seen a few non white faces in PMBA events. I can’t really think of a reason for the lack of representation, maybe a cultural thing in that you are more likely to take it up if you have some mates that are into it. I suppose if you are non white then it would be easy to perceive it as a white only sport from looking at magazines etc. Incidentaly, one of my best MTBing and drinking mates is non white.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    I don’t expect you to get it, its a complex issue and I don’t fully get it either. Im just trying to educate myself and try and understand other peoples experiences.

    I don’t get it either, lots to learn. I understand even less those that think there is no issue, and have nothing to learn, because they “haven’t seen any problems”.

    crikey
    Free Member

    I don’t expect you to get it,

    Yup, I always find the best way to engage people is to be patronising.

    Mountain biking maybe “flourishing worldwide” but we need to look at why socially and culturally uptake of this sport is so low for BAME people

    It’s not actually a sport for the majority of people in the UK, it’s a leisure activity.
    Why do we ‘need’ to look at it in this way?
    Different leisure activities attract different people at different times in their lives. Lumping all BAME people together and asking why are you not mountain biking is as insulting as asking why all white people don’t go skiing.

    cloggy
    Full Member

    That’s a bit of a cop out. There is under representation in mountainbiking as there is in most other outdoor activities. But is that just due to conceptions and attitudes within those communities? If there is negative pressure from the majority community, well that should be addressed. I well remember a BAME biker that couldn’t get served in South London. White guys would have to get the parts from the shops for him. Has that attitude completely disappeared?

    joepud
    Free Member

    I don’t expect you to get it,

    Yup, I always find the best way to engage people is to be patronising.

    Yup, and i always find the best way to engage people is to also misquote them too. The full quote is “I don’t expect you to get it, its a complex issue and I don’t fully get it either. Im just trying to educate myself and try and understand other peoples experiences.”

    Jordan
    Full Member

    cloggy

    I well remember a BAME biker that couldn’t get served in South London. White guys would have to get the parts from the shops for him. Has that attitude completely disappeared?

    I sincerely hope so!

    dannyh
    Free Member

    why have a discussion when you can get angry at the title.

    You must be new here….?

    kully
    Free Member

    Hey,

    I know people here are super-cool, and 99.9% of people I meet on the bike are too.

    But.

    There are a small minority of people who make it **** shite.

    Being told there is nothing to sell in a shop, having drinks poured over, whispered “get the **** out of here you ****”, having the police called for biviying somewhere out-of-sight, bike clubs…

    I’ll happily take any ribbing or abuse on the chin (brummie, council house boy), but words which make you question your right to exist are … painful. So I mostly bimble about on my own or with the children and find great joy in just messing about on bikes away from other people.

    We all get grief for many things (class, gender, wheel size), don’t feel that speaking about one form of discrimination diminishes any others or is a personal attack on you (unless your _that_ bellend).

    poah
    Free Member

    Mountain biking maybe “flourishing worldwide” but we need to look at why socially and culturally uptake of this sport is so low for BAME people and its likely because of systemic racist structures within our society.

    how about we start saying people rather than BAME people. That pisses my friend right off – lets try and stop segregating by segregating.

    Maybe some people are just not interested in it or not close to facilities or have transport or can afford it.

    TooTall
    Free Member

    Whether you think mountain biking ‘is racist’, have a look around you and think on what it looks like. It’s always looked like male, middle aged middle class and white to me, and I’m right in that demographic.
    So why is that? Some great points raised on here that got me thinking more. I’m now in the US and It’s been great to see more Latin and African American faces on the trails, but that has been very recent.

    argee
    Full Member

    It’s a question we’ll probably never answer properly, but it is something we’ve all thought at some point, not due to racism, but due to the reasoning as to why certain demographics are under represented still, i remember back to the early 2000s, seeing a woman on the tracks was a rarity, now they are well represented from what i see, same with kids, lots out there, a lot of this is to do with the changes in things like trail centres, accessibility and so on, but personally, i can’t get my head round why BAME is still under represented, and again, as stated earlier, that’s because i just don’t have the knowledge or understanding.

    RichPenny
    Free Member

    Cheers OP, that was really interesting and well worth a listen. Covers a lot of the points on here, some pretty thought provoking content and a positive message.

    It’s not actually a sport for the majority of people in the UK, it’s a leisure activity.
    Why do we ‘need’ to look at it in this way?

    The women in MTB point came up a lot as well. Surely everyone here loves mtb and recognises it as a wonderful thing. Isn’t it just trying to understand why some parts of society aren’t involved and trying to see if that can change. Then we can sell more e-bikes to people 😉

    Different leisure activities attract different people at different times in their lives. Lumping all BAME people together and asking why are you not mountain biking is as insulting as asking why all white people don’t go skiing.

    Yep, there was a bit of that being ridiculed in the podcast! But also some interesting opinions about why there might be much lower levels of interest. As I say, if you have some time it’s worth listening to.

    RichPenny
    Free Member

    but personally, i can’t get my head round why BAME is still under represented, and again, as stated earlier, that’s because i just don’t have the knowledge or understanding.

    Ah, if only there was a friendly discussion on easily accessible media that could help with that 😉

    brads
    Free Member

    It’s always looked like male, middle aged middle class and white to me, and I’m right in that demographic.

    Going to have to call that out as rubbish, sorry. I see a fair mix or male, female young old moneyed and not so moneyed.

    Mostly white, yes but not exclusively but mostly.
    Why is that ? I don’t know. Mountainbiking attracts fairly modern forward thinking folk and I don’t see racism.

    It’s easy to say that white folk exclude others but I imagine some parts of the community can be very insular and not want to take part in something which is not culturally normal for them.

    I’m in Scotland where the mix is very different to , say , the Midlands , so you would expect the sport to be mainly white. Doesn’t make Scottish cyclists racist or exclusive.

    Poopscoop
    Full Member

    Even on Zwift you don’t see many black riders oddly.

    On Zwift you can change your skin colour etc to preference.

    No idea what the above means, pure observation.

    I’ve always thought of biking as pretty inclusive but it’s never a bad thing to question that reality.

    RichPenny
    Free Member

    It’s easy to say that white folk exclude others but I imagine some parts of the community can be very insular and not want to take part in something which is not culturally normal for them.

    There wasn’t a massive amount of talking about explicit exclusion. Which rings true for me in my experiences. Definitely a lot about what might push people away from biking or not consider it in the first place. And how (more the industry really) can engage differently with different people. MTB felt like a male sport when I started and that’s definitely changed for the better. Think it’s probably a similar journey.

    greeny30
    Free Member

    Black people arent into biking because the myth that white men can’t jump has been busted 😊.
    Seriously though if mountain biking isnt of interest for whatever reason, culturally or just not cool enough then it’s hardly the fault of mountain biking, nobody’s putting up barriers. My biking mate is mixed race, non of his black friends and family are interested, it’s a weird one and from my experience nothing to do with racism.

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    I don’t understand what two links to an African and Indian bike series does to prove there isn’t any racists in cycling?

    Amended that for you.

    Yes yes, some people are racist, we’ve long established that. Does not mean the sport itself is racist, that argument is completely illogical, and it appears you’d argue anything and everything has a racist element to it.
    This is a predominantly white country. Is the percentage too skewed ?
    So what is that percentage Joe, and how is it skewed.

    Of the population, X number are white, X number are black, brown or whatever.
    Then you want us to correlate that minority against what you must consider to be the average number of not cyclists, but specifically mountain bikers.

    RichPenny
    Free Member

    Seriously though if mountain biking isnt of interest for whatever reason, culturally or just not cool enough then it’s hardly the fault of mountain biking

    You know that thing where you bang on at whoever will listen about how ace biking is? And you drag a few people in and they finally get it and it feels like you’ve made their world a better place?

    Think it’s like that. And really it’s beneficial to the mtb community (again, probably most beneficial to the “business” side, but that trickles down) to be cooler and culturally relevant to more people.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    love it

    there is obvious under representation of non white folk at all levels in all types of cycling and here we have a bunch of white men ( mainly?) pontificating as to why!

    Jordan
    Full Member

    dyna-ti

    Of the population, X number are white, X number are black, brown or whatever.
    Then you want us to correlate that minority against what you must consider to be the average number of not cyclists, but specifically mountain bikers

    This^^! Lets face it, as mountain bikers we are in a relative minority of society as a whole. If non white mtbers are few and far between, is that not just a reflection of society in general?

    p7eaven
    Free Member

    Heads up to save others faffing – just listening in to the OP podcast and the discussion begins at 5min 15secs in.

    oakleymuppet
    Free Member

    My post earlier was poorly worded, to clarify – my opinion is that people should take note of Kullys post.

    Let’s forget the outright abuse for a minute (which is completely unacceptable) and focus on the greyer area…..I’d feel pretty uncomfortable getting my cock out in a Japanese Onsen because I’d probably be the only white dude there. However having some slightly mental Japanese friends, I probably would.

    The same applies to a lot of social situations, it’s easy to feel like an outsider and even easier to do encourage someone who is an outsider to take part with a bit of friendly encouragement and understanding. Integration does work both ways but the biggest hurdle is making someone from another culture or someone who feels that they stand out – feel comfortable in your cultural setting.

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    there is obvious under representation of non white folk at all levels in all types of cycling and here we have a bunch of white men ( mainly?) pontificating as to why!

    If we don’t pontificate about it then chances are we’ll ignore it and not seek to help improve the situation if that is what is required. Debate is good.

    FWIW there’s a very similar discussion being held on the Bearbones forum. Not instigated by this podcast however and not just focussing on racial minorities.

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    This^^! Lets face it, as mountain bikers we are in a relative minority of society as a whole. If non white mtbers are few and far between, is that not just a reflection of society in general?

    Basically no. Apparently 15% of the UK population are “non-white”, across all the different cycling niches I participate in and follow, I honestly don’t believe 15% of those taking part are people of colour. Nevermind the proportion of female participation, 51% of the UK population are female, there’s no way you can claim half of all cyclists are women…

    Unfortunately you can’t claim it’s a “reflection of wider society”, something about cycling in general makes it less appealing to non-white, non-male people. It may well be that the presentation of current cycling cultures all too accurately reflects it’s existing composition.

    If you come from a community that historically hasn’t fared well when dealing with groups of white men, I can understand why, despite the actual activity looking fun, you might well be put off…

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Scotroutes – in one way I agree but given the direction of similar topics on here in the past its just funny

    Bez
    Full Member

    Maybe some people are just not interested in it or not close to facilities or have transport or can afford it.

    But that’s the reason to look into social inequality, not to dismiss it.

    If the barriers to participation in anything are lack of money, lack of transport and/or lack of access, and those factors correlate with a lack of participation from any demographic, then that tells you that the demographic in question is most likely significantly disadvantaged in terms of money, mobility and/or opportunity.

    And that’s where social equality—racial or otherwise—bites.

    hols2
    Free Member

    DH is (was?) massive in Japan, why no riders?

    A friend of a friend dated a guy who was Japanese national DH champ three years running about 20 years ago. He did some WC races, finished around 50th place from what I remember. He said that the WC courses were much faster with much bigger jumps than what he was used to and he wasn’t as physically strong as the top guys so struggled to muscle the bike around. He’d started out as an XC racer for a major brand, but switched to DH when he realized that he was more competitive at that. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t big, strong guys in Japan, but MTB is a niche sport so promising athletes would probably be steered towards baseball, football, or rugby by high-school coaches because that’s where the money’s at.

    trumpton
    Free Member

    I was friends with a Muslim man and helped him buy a specialised mtb. Took him for a ride and he thought we were just going on the road.he reluctantly went offroad a bit but said he never wanted to go again. Its was something about his religion which looked down on getting muddy and mixed with dirt.being near dirt scared him.not sure exactly what so excuse my ignorance.he still rides the bike on road years later so thats good.i understand that for young asians bikes are looked down upon as a form of transport you have to ride if you haven’t made and if you ride a bike you cannot afford car.this I found out after chatting to many asians.ivusedcto go riding with a black person or person of colour.he was a great rider very strong with good endurance and a great guy.really into his biking too.pretty sure he has mever experienced racism in biking.people choose to do what they are interested in and drawn towards.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 148 total)

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