Putting "Manager" in your job title on LinkedIn.

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  • Putting "Manager" in your job title on LinkedIn.
  • Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Seriously, don’t ever do it.

    I’ve had a mostly dormant LI profile for a few years and apart from the occasional random add request and various peer endorsements it’s been mostly ignored.

    At the back end of last year I changed roles into a management position and I updated my profile to read “Technical Manager.” Since then I’ve had more bloody connection requests, spam, random unsolicited CVs, cold calls and assorted bobbins from recruitment agencies and the like that I’ve lost count. The shitehawks are guessing my email address from my name and workplace, and even ringing reception asking to speak to me. Had one fecker on Friday tell them I was expecting their call!

    I have close to zero involvement in recruitment, my direct reports are apprentices from college. Friday’s caller told me, “well, you’re a manager, you must have a team!”

    “Must I?” I asked. I’d better get on to my boss then, see why I’ve not got one. “Well, can you give me the names of people who do?” she asks. No, I don’t give out company details to cold callers. Ten minutes I spent on the phone politely refusing to give her anything.

    Don’t do it kids (unless you’re job hunting, in which case you’re on to a winner).

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    Does that mean I should just be a product.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    That’s closer to the truth than you perhaps meant.

    Premier Icon grahamt1980
    Subscriber

    You don’t need manager in your title, all you need is to have updated the bloody thing.
    The place just seems to be full of recruiters

    deadkenny
    Member

    unless you’re job hunting, in which case you’re on to a winner

    Or not. They may be fishing for contacts or potential positions. Managers are the people they want to talk to for this.

    Job hunting, if they’re directly contacting you, you are unlikely to be top of the pile. You have something they want. Contacts, positions or even your existing job they can try to fill. Actually placing the job is secondary to the fees they get from the clients. Obviously they ultimately get the fees by placing people but it’s a juggling game using the most lucrative talent in their books or possibly the ones asking for less money but where the client will give them a bigger overhead.

    In short, never for a minute think they have your best interests at heart. Same goes for the clients looking for resources. Again, the fees are the key. Pay more and you might get better candidates, or maybe not if you are too ready to accept the rubbish they’ll push forward initially but are coughing up a big fee.

    (and approach companies direct or through your own contacts if you’re looking for a job 😉 ).

    jambalaya
    Member

    Most connection requests I get are from headhunters (mate of mine in that business says linkedin is a headhunters dream as they can do their research for free whereas before thay had to pay) or people looking for jobs. Quite close to deleting mine as I know others have.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    Does that mean I should just be a product.

    Yes, You are a “Human Resource”.

    nealglover
    Member

    Ten minutes I spent on the phone politely refusing to give her anything.

    I think I know where you went wrong there.

    If the phone has a cord attached, say goodbye into the mouthpiece, then put the phone back where you found it.
    If it doesn’t have a cord, say goodbye then press the red button 😉

    In short, never for a minute think they have your best interests at heart.

    That’s a very sweeping generalisation and a huge negative. These people are the front of their company , and as we know, there are good companies and bad companies. Much like there are credible posters and fools that post in the forum. Experience tells me that there as some very good and professional recruiters out there, and yes, they are rewarded for placing people. But they do, and should, have your interests on their list of priorities otherwise they’d soon get a reputation for placing muppets and have a short business life.
    There are recruiters that I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending due to their hard work and professionalism.
    As for cold calling businesses to speak to people I’ll simply ask how your place of work gets new business. Every business has to send salesmen out to tout for new business. Some people react positively, some negatively and politely and others are negative and rude. But don’t be underr any illusion that your company doesn’t cold call. 😉

    Linkedin I have also found to be useful, I’ll get many requests to link up (and quite a few from recruiters), it doesn’t bother me. It’s not hard to contact me directly and yet I don’t get innundated with calls. This is probably more to do with being shite at my job though. And I do find Linkedin useful in getting information across to fellow professionals.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I think I know where you went wrong there.

    If the phone has a cord attached, say goodbye into the mouthpiece,

    Thing is, I was working whilst she was talking so it made no practical difference to me how long I was talking. So I figured, she’s called me to waste my time, I may as well return the favour.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    As for cold calling businesses to speak to people I’ll simply ask how your place of work gets new business.

    Advertise on a mountain biking forum?

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    I’ve found a Dadaist approach to linkedin works quite well for being ignored.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    That’s no good for me, I don’t have kids.

    deadkenny
    Member

    That’s a very sweeping generalisation and a huge negative

    I’ve dealt with a huge amount over 20+ years and seen it from candidate and client sides. Not one has proven my opinion otherwise.

    Yes there are “good guys” out there but still there’s nothing I’ve seen that tells me they are not looking out for themselves or their own business. Of course not. That’s their business. Same as estate agents. As much as they lay it on with charm they really are not doing it because they enjoy seeing the ideal candidate placed in the candidate’s ideal job.

    Cougar – Moderator
    Advertise on a mountain biking forum?

    Funny enough, that approach got me one of my jobs.

    In the last 10 years, I’ve had zero success and a hell of a lot of being messed around via agents, but have got all my contracts via contacts I know, and it’s saved the clients a lot of money in agent fees (except one which despite being placed direct via a friend, the company “only deals with agents” and was forced to sign up to one of their recommended ones who’s rep did absolutely no work, no effort on renewals, but took the money).

    Yes there are “good guys” out there but still there’s nothing I’ve seen that tells me they are not looking out for themselves or their own business. Of course not. That’s their business. Same as estate agents. As much as they lay it on with charm they really are not doing it because they enjoy seeing the ideal candidate placed in the candidate’s ideal job.

    Don’t just keep it to those two groups, all sales people are doing it for their own good or the good of their employer.

    Advertise on a mountain biking forum?

    Never thought about that, I’ll have a word with our marketing dept tomorrow. I’m sure they start mountaing biking very, very soon. :mrgreen:

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