pro's and con's of being a roadie

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  • pro's and con's of being a roadie
  • bwfc4eva868
    Member

    Well after it being in my mind for about 8 months I have been told by the missus if you want one just try it once we get some bits done in the house. Now I’ve always been intrigued by it and think I’d like to have a go but I’m unsure as I get seriously annoyed at shit drivers when on the motorbike.

    So what are the pro’s and cons of being a roadie or am I better off sticking to my mountain bike.
    Inspire me or tell me it’s a bad idea people please.

    ormondroyd
    Member

    Pros: Distance, speed, fitness. You learn to pedal better, and that benefits mountain biking. Cake.

    Cons: You’ve already put your finger on it. You have to shout occasionally.

    marrv
    Member

    Its just cycling Jim but different.
    Go out with a club or a chaingang and block the road at 25 – 30 mph and scream at any car that comes near. sorted.

    warton
    Member

    Pros, its brilliant.
    Cons, it will take over your life. Seriously addictive sport.

    mangatank
    Member

    Pros: road bikes…lovely. Get a carbon fibre one.

    Cons: your mountain bike will start gathering dust 😉

    marrv
    Member

    Actually… now i think about it. Cons are drivers trying to kill you, often on purpose. though you’ll know all sbout that ridining motorbike.
    one big pro for me is having a nice bike and not smashing the crap out of it everytime I ride it like the mountain bike being covered in gloop and chips and dings etc. but to be able to set off at dawn with some sarnies in your pocket and ride 100 miles plus and get a silly suntan, my favourite.

    mrmo
    Member

    pros, you don’t spend your life cleaning bikes, you can ride anytime you feel like it, speed, fitness, cake stops

    cons, cars. (but if you find the right roads there aren’t that many, certainly not as many as some seem to think)

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    One other thing. Will it help with my bad lateral knee ligaments? I’ve torn them three times now in 4 years.

    mrmo
    Member

    no idea if it will help, but i would be careful about pedal choice and setup.

    timc
    Member

    pros, something different

    cons, cars

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Cons- it is basically crap
    Pros- but slightly less crap than not riding bikes

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    What gear will I need apart from the obvious helmet, gloves and bike. Any good routes in the Lancashire area?

    alexcornwall
    Member

    cons – can’t ride them off road, or on bumpy roads, braking and handling is dangerous, uncomfortable.

    pros – fast, fast, fast, maintenance free

    nikk
    Member

    The amount of fitness you achieve is not dependent on the bike you buy, it is dependent on how you use it.

    It is possible to ride MTBs on the road, especially hardtails. Doubly so with slicks (Super Motos rock).

    Unless you are competing, ask yourself what you want to get out of it. A nice light hardtail can do multi day trips with tents and things. On road and off. May be more fun than a racer?

    globalti
    Member

    Any good routes in the Lancashire area?

    Are you for real? I mean seriously, have you ever got out of your trail centre and looked at a map of Lancashire?

    Lancashire (along with Yorkshire I’ll grudgingly admit) is one of the best counties in Britain for cycling. To the west you’ve got the flatlands of the Fylde and to the east you ride up the Ribble valley then dive off into the Bowland Fells and West Pennines, though being closer to the connurbation the West Pennine roads tend to be busier. In Bowland you’ve got three big climbs over the tops including the Trough with a scattering of great cafes at all strategic points. Further east and you’ve got the Gisburn area then heading over towards the Dales with cafe havens like Settle. All of these are within easy reach for a cyclist being on a scale of 10 – 20 miles. The Ribble valley and northerly & easterly roads are empty and the few drivers you do see are so accustomed to cyclists that they treat us with respect.

    You can choose between easy rolling routes and steep and nasty – Birdy Brow, Whitewell, Whalley Nab, Jeffrey Hill are the classic climbs as well as a killer on the Clitheroe road coming out of Lancaster. You’ve got pretty villages and amazing open mooorland with huges vistas from North Wales through Liverpool, Blackpool Tower, Heysham, Morecambe bay and the South Lakes.

    There are no less than four bike shops in Clitheroe as well as others on the flatlands. Lancashire is road riding paradise!

    The pros of road riding: No dirt and no attrition to chain, transmission and brakes. You can ride hard from your front door to the cafe and onwards choosing any route you fancy with no worry about legality. Get home, stow the bike and head straight for the shower with no need for cleaning kit or bike unless it’s been wet. Road riding gets you much much fitter because it is unrelenting and all about maintaining good average speeds through skilful use of gears, momentum and drafting.

    The cons? Having worked my way through 20 years of mountain bike obsession I am suddenly into a new wave of bike madness! This time though it’s about finesse, equipment, cleanliness, weight and obsessive fettling. Oh and the poor old mountain bike is feeling neglected.

    Get yourself to Green Jersey bike shop and cafe in Clitheroe on a quiet day and ask Richard the owner to make you a coffee then take you through the various bikes on offer at different budgets. If you are 6′ I don’t mind lending you my Tricross disc and taking you out for a taster (you can also ride my carbon roadie) and if you’re about 5’10” I’ve got an “as new” Bianchi Nirone C2C that I’ll sell you for £700, negotiable.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I think the idea of getting into road bikes is just that I wanna get out and ride somewhere with nice scenary. And wouldn’t mind now and again doing some competetive stuff. Now as I work 5 days a week on silly nhs shifts, I really find it hard to get the motivation to get home kit up with the mountain bike and either drive to Gisburn or go up to Darden more and fight through a bog fest. I love it when it’s sunny and dry.

    I only have a small 400 pound budget max as we are supposed to be saving up for our wedding. I know I may not get a superbike with that but my mtb didn’t cost much more. I just like the idea but I’m unsure also.

    officialtob
    Member

    have a small 400 pound budget

    Same as me – the classified section is your friend here. 🙂

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    So what are the pro’s and cons of being a roadie

    just ride you mountain bike on the road, the experience in traffic is surprisingly similar

    saxabar
    Member

    Pros: great for 60/90min blasts; peaceful (I ride alone); very little cleaning faff; qualitatively different from mtb; builds stamina for mtb.

    Cons: cars/lorries (avoid peak times); clips (I don’t have these on mtb) and while a boon of sorts, I have come a cropper a couple of times.

    Premier Icon Furious
    Subscriber

    have a small 400 pound budget
    Same as me – the classified section is your friend here.

    Or Decathlon…

    Mintman
    Member

    My road bike is a GT GTR that I got in a sale for that price and with the suggestions above you can easily get a bike.

    It’s surprisingly good fun, less gloppy mud than I get on my MTB and if you pick a route down quiet roads you can really get lost (literally) in the scenery.

    BristolPablo
    Member

    as others have said, being able to ride straight from your garage is the biggest benefit and for me, getting to quiet roads within ten minutes or so of the house. Cars and traffc arent so bad in the quieter areas and there is something nice about climbing big steep hills on a road bike. Looking at your computer and seeing that you have averaged 30 kph on a ride is nice too given you struggle to get half that on an mtb ride. I ride alone too, pick the right route and you can not see anyone for an hour or two.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Tried it, bought one, rode it… didn’t like it.

    They handle like crap, brake like crap, ride like crap and are WAY less fun than MTB’s.

    I still ride on the road, i did yesterday and i probably will today too… However on my Spearfish, not on the road bike.

    Pros; Fitness, exploring paces easily without having to travel miles in the car beforehand, Fast and dry summer roads, warm evening rides, crisp winter night rides, hill climbing, club rides. Low maintainence.

    Cons; Not many really. As others have said, if you can get on to the minor roads then traffic isn’t a problem. Roadie haters that can’t accept it’s just another form of riding bkes. 😉 It’s bloody adictive and very expensive once you get the bug. Mmmm, shiny carbon!

    They handle like crap, brake like crap, ride like crap and are WAY less fun than MTB’s

    You’re on the wrong bike then. Mine handle amazingly. Sharp, reponsive and good brakes. 🙂

    Tarmac is unyielding and painful when you eat the inevitable shit-biscuit.

    MrSmith
    Member

    pro’s? Not many but it really gets up the noses of the stick in the mud MTB’ers (as opposed to cyclists) on here which is priceless.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    You’re on the wrong bike then. Mine handle amazingly. Sharp, reponsive and good brakes.

    Nopes, i’m on an MTB now 🙂

    mudshark
    Member

    They handle like crap, brake like crap, ride like crap and are WAY less fun than MTB’s.

    A bad workman blames his tools. 😉

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Bollox, some people just don’t like them, simple as that. It was brand new, professionally ‘fitted’ it was the right size etc etc. They’re just rubbish for some people. I was/am them people.

    saxabar
    Member

    It’s bloody addictive and very expensive once you get the bug.

    Definitely addictive, but after a large initial outlay (£1000) I don’t think I’ve spent a penny in a year. Mtb on the other hand…!

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Pros: Gets you from A to B quick; hardly any maintenance/cleaning; roads dont get muddy; you can listen to music; keeps you fit

    Cons: Boring as hell; car drivers; van drivers; lorry drivers; bus drivers; boring.

    Pro’s – Club runs are if anything more soical than their MTB equivelents as everyone tends to stick in a group rather than strung out down a trail, especialy in the bigger clubs where there’s often 15-16 -16-17, 18-19, and FAST (etc), groups so you don’t get dropped.

    – fitness

    – riding to place you’d not otherwise go. i’m always amazed how much stuff can be reached in a day.

    – trafic free back roads. Like a local MTB club knows the local trails beyond the bridleways, roadie club runs are good for stitching together long loops of quiet back roads. Even in the Chilterns and London commuter belt it’s easy to do a loop with very few busy roads.

    Cons – Tendancy to ignore the MTB during an addiction.

    – car’s, but they’re suprisingly easy to minimise as an inconvenience.

    – cost, yes you can ride a £300 bike from Decathlon, yes it is all about the rider. But show me a roadie who actualy lives that mantra?

    – chubby MTB’ers overtaking you on a mid January base mile/recovery ride then posting about it on the internet.

    MrSmith
    Member

    They’re just rubbish for some people.

    User error.

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Subscriber

    After many years of only riding on the road I got the off-road bug last year and hardly touched the road bikes for a year. But I went for a spin on one of them again last week, so here are my observations.

    After trying to ride a 30lb full suss bike up proper mountains the hills feel really easy on the road.

    The effort is more sustained on the road. I could ride for an hour at a pretty constant intensity whereas off-road it is more varied.

    My road bike feels very uncomfortable, stiff and twitchy after the MTB, but you soon get back into it.

    It’s very fast.

    Cars are bloody annoying.

    rocket
    Member

    Pro
    – great alternative to MTB if you live many miles from the trails. Moving from trails on doorstep to no trails for 40 miles (100+ for anything decent), I either had to give up riding, or embrace the lycra.

    Cons
    – You look like a nob in lycra. This isn’t just me looking like a nob (I do) – its all of us. Wearing baggies and a peak on your helmet won’t help – you’ll just look like a nob who’s wearing innapropriate clothing trying desperately not to look like a nob, and get ostracised by those who have managed to deal with, and have come to embrace, looking like a nob. After a while riding a road bike your brain switches off certain parts that make you feel shame looking like a nob, so the embarrassment subsides, and then you even start yo feel a certain pride in your ‘athletic’ appearance. But when you stop and think for a moment, or your other half catches a glimpse of you as you are getting ready to go go out (just bibs and arm warmers on, hrm round your scrawny chest), or worst of all you bump in to non roadie mate / colleague whilst out on road bike, it all comes flooding back and you break down in tears of shame and self loathing. Or is that just me?
    – Cars

    Gary_M
    Member

    Now I’ve always been intrigued by it and think I’d like to have a go

    Its just a bike, why over complicate it.

    There are no cons, its all great.

    Kuco
    Member

    Cons
    – You look like a nob in lycra

    To non cyclist you’ll just look a nob on a bike anyway no matter what you wear.

    bikebouy
    Member

    ” looks around and over his shoulders “

    Nope, can’t see any cons.

    Is it just me that read’s this thread and see’s two sides?

    a) people who don’t go on club runs and find road bikes boring and dull and dangerous.

    b) people who do go on club runs and find road bikes great for fitness, social, and lovely trafic free roads with cake at the end.

    (and C, people who’ve not tried them and/or don’t look good in lycra)

    Kuco
    Member

    I’ve never been on a club run yet love my road bike.

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