Viewing 39 posts - 1 through 39 (of 39 total)
  • Prescription Glasses
  • Premier Icon excitable1
    Free Member

    I’ve been wearing prescription glasses for a few years now which cater for a slight prescription for near sight IE they help with the cows that are faaaar away ! I’ve never ridden with glasses and the few times I’ve tried off the shelf non-prescription riding glasses I’ve not really got on with them. However, the prescription is getting gradually worse and I’ve reached the stage where I think I’d benefit from wearing some prescription glasses on the bike.

    So, can anyone please point me in the direction of where to buy such a thing please. I’m not interested in bling or anything that sits on top of your normal glasses (it is just a slight prescription). They obviously need to be rugged and capable of getting northern muck and grit all over them and then wiped off and I’m assuming that someone will make the lenses and glasses together rather me having to buy some glasses and have lenses made.

    Thanks in advance…

    Premier Icon joebristol
    Full Member

    I went the separate route of buying some Oakley half jackets and getting them glazed with polycarbonate prescription lenses. They’ve been pretty good so far.

    If you want to buy them all in one without going crazy Oakley cost them I think spec savers have a brand that aren’t premium but are designed for sport. Maybe they’re called RX Sports or something like that.

    Premier Icon rossburton
    Full Member

    I just ride with my normal glasses on…

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    I’d try some disposable contact lenses instead. I don’t think I ride as well In glasses because they leave my peripheral vision uncorrected.

    Premier Icon munrobiker
    Free Member

    Contact lenses really changed how I ride. Glasses fog up, get covered in crap and don’t offer the variety of tints you’d need a perfect world without adding a lot of expense. You may also find, as I did, that they don’t offer you a complete field of in focus vision – with the head down position on a bike you’ll be looking over them a lot, or missing out on something in your periphery.

    I started on dailies for riding and sport but ended up, after about ten years, moving onto monthlies and I just wear them all the time. If they work with your eyes they can be really amazing.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    contact lenses is pretty much always the answer to this question. Unless you’re really phobic or can’t afford them

    1. You don’t need to stop and wipe the muck off to see properly.

    2. glasses steam up.

    3. You don’t need to buy another set of glasses or carry a spare just in case you snap them in a crash.

    Having said that, a friend of mine just had to have pretty severe surgery to repair the damage to his eye caused by something pining up from his front tyre, rare I know, but I’ve made sure I’ve got something on ever since.

    Premier Icon excitable1
    Free Member

    I don’t think I can use contacts because of the shape of my eyeballs (although I might have dreamt that fact). I can appreciate the benefits of contacts that everyone has pointed out but when I think of all the crap and living things I’ve had in my eyes over the years, plus the tears I shed when it starts to get cold I really can’t see me getting on with them, and whilst there might be some wipage and fogging involved I was thinking good glasses designed for mountain biking might be better for me.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    Have you worn contact before? I only ask, as most folk who’ve never tried them have imagined horror stories about what they’re like. Often mostly over exaggerated or just wrong really and a eyeball the wrong shape is rare. Especially as your ‘script is so mild. Most opticians are happy to let you have a free set with your prescription, or you can use sites like lenstore to try contacts for relatively little outlay. (certainly less than a new pair of specs).

    I won’t labour the point any more than this post I promise, but I would say, just try them and see how you get on, they’re often transformative.

    Premier Icon Alphabet
    Full Member

    I’ve always used Optilabs for prescription sports glasses.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    I always wear specs when riding anyway so prescription lenses are my solution. I use Oakley Transitions for all of my riding. I’m still on my first frame and now on my second set if lenses. That’s in 10+ years. Judged over that timescale I’d say that’s good vfm.

    Premier Icon SaxonRider
    Full Member

    Another vote for disposable contacts. I don’t generally wear contacts except for riding, but when I do, man do they make a difference!

    I just order DaySoft lenses by the truck-load, and bin them after a ride (or, if they’re not feeling too gritty, keep them in for the rest of the day). Either way, they’re super cheap and extremely effective.

    Highly recommended as a go-to riding solution.

    Premier Icon escrs
    Free Member

    Used to wear contacts on the bike for 10 years but after a couple of issues where something got into my eye then i had to remove the contact mid way down a trail made for a very interesting descent, even carrying some spares still makes them a pain to fit by the side of a trail

    Contacts are great for summer/dry conditions but any other conditions then glasses are the better option, i personally wear Oakley’s fitted with their Transition lenses, they never seem to fog up, offer protection from flying objects, they have never fallen off either

    A good front mudguard will stop any mud getting on them plus as they are transition lenses they offer UV protection

    Premier Icon Wookster
    Full Member

    Hello! I can’t be arsed with contact’s tbh, they dry out, if you get anything in your eye when they’re in it’s a nightmare, I do t wear them often enough to be used to them etc etc!

    So in answer to you question I bought a pair of sports glasses from Specsavers, just clear lenses they are a wrap around type and I think they’re great! I wear glasses all the time anyway and always do in the bike so these are great. They were about £100. Not the most stylish I agree but then Im an overweight middle aged man coved in mud, dirt, blood dust oil (delete where not applicable) 😂😂 so I take that in perspective…..😂😂

    They are great very tough frames and lenses and if I lost them it’s £100 not £300 like Oakley would be.

    I do fancy getting my Oakleys done mainly as they are great frames which I own already but haven’t done so yet.

    Premier Icon richard
    Full Member

    I used to always wear disposable contacts when riding, but I found you do need some sort of sports glasses over the top when riding. I’ve hack mud get in, and I’ve even had a lens come out due to some strong winds and my eyes watering. Fitting a spare lens trailside is a bit risky… They just weren’t a perfect solution.
    Since getting some Oakley Transition prescription flak jackets I’ve rarely bothered with contact lenses. I’m just much happier wearing glasses. You do have to be careful with the lenses so as not to scratch them, but with care mine have lasted years. Oakleys are rather expensive, but there are a fair number of much cheaper options these days.

    Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    contact lenses is pretty much always the answer to this question. Unless you’re really phobic or can’t afford them

    Or they don’t work for you, like they don’t work for me (eyeballs are the wrong shape apparently, go figure)

    So, the answer I always give to this question is find a cheap set of sports sunglasses (like my £3 Mountain Equipment examples), pop the lenses out and get them reglazed at

    http://www.reglaze-glasses-direct.com

    Choice of standard, polarised, transitions etc lenses. I’ve had a few pairs now, no complaints.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Contact lenses didn’t work for me either.

    Premier Icon munrobiker
    Free Member

    I’d disagree and say that wet conditions is when contacts are at their best. Glasses get covered in muck and wetness, then you can’t see out of them and if you clean them you risk scratching them. And uphill in cold wet weather they steam up, but you can’t take them off like you can with clear protective non-prescription glasses.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Look at safety specs online.

    I’m about to push the button on a pair of bill ones

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    I still sometimes wear glasses or goggles over contacts, depends on the conditions.

    I just found that when you’re looking far down the trail you can’t subconsciously deal with the up-close stuff in your lower peripheral vision unless you have sharp focus there. With glasses I might drop my view to look at the stuff near the front wheel, with constant lenses I find it easier to keep a more distant focus, which helps me ride looser and smoother.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Full Member

    I’m getting along well with these. I did stump up the slight bit more for some thinner, photochromic lenses (not transitions).

    Not as sexy looking as a pair of Oakley’s, but nothing like as pricey either, worth a browse around for online outfits IMO, don’t just accept that Glasses have to cost what your high street optician is asking…

    Premier Icon flashpaul
    Full Member

    Zenni optical offer some decent prescription sports glasses

    Think my basic ones were about $40 delivered

    Premier Icon jkomo
    Free Member

    Specsavers do single vision from £19 all in.
    You get to try them on, and get them fitted by a human.

    Premier Icon oldagedpredator
    Full Member

    I’ve used contacts with sports sunglasses for 25 years.

    Only two issues in that time – about 4 years ago I switched from yearly to monthly. New lenses are noticeably thinner, had a couple of occasions where I lost one round the side of my eye. Generally when the lens it getting towards the end of it’s life. They have popped out again an hour os so later, freaked me a bit first time.

    Also started going long sighted – now if I have the lenses in I can’t focus to do some trail side fixes.

    Been thinking of going glasses full time – either an insert for my current riding glasses or some dedicated ones. It’s either that or a spare pair of cheap the off peg glasses for trail fixes. The only thing that puts me off glasses full time for riding is condensation.

    Premier Icon Fat-boy-fat
    Full Member

    I’ve got some Rad8 mudhugger prescription glasses. They have transition lenses and a pretty darned good anti fog coating. I sweat like a good un and ride year round in Scotland … they very rarely fog up. Mebbes not as good optically as Oakley glasses but pretty fantastic for me 2 years in.

    Premier Icon coatesy
    Free Member

    Take whatever advice you want from the above replies, but i’d recommend avoiding anything with a seperate carrier for the lenses behind the main shield, they fog-up too easily, are difficult to keep clean, (and I also found the extra weight encouraged them to constantly slide down my nose). Another good place to buy from are RXSport, very helpful and knowledgeable, and a lot cheaper than the high st.for big brand names. Good service, and quick too (usually a lot quicker than they advertise).

    Premier Icon northernsoul
    Full Member

    i’d recommend avoiding anything with a seperate carrier for the lenses behind the main shield, they fog-up too easily, are difficult to keep clean, (and I also found the extra weight encouraged them to constantly slide down my nose).

    I’d agree with that. I’ve also found single vision lenses hard to get on with, especially when negotiating uphill and hike a bike sections, where close distances are hard to judge. (I’m slightly short sighted and wear varifocals day to day). At some point I’ll look for prescription varifocals – I wish I’d gone straight for these rather than trying the cheaper route.

    Premier Icon oldagedpredator
    Full Member

    i’d recommend avoiding anything with a seperate carrier for the lenses behind the main shield, they fog-up too easily, are difficult to keep clean, (and I also found the extra weight encouraged them to constantly slide down my nose)

    Hadn’t considered impact of weight, that’s just adding to the reasons not to go insert.

    I had wondered if I’d find the closeness to the eye an issue or if the lens moved or vibrated it would be annoying / distracting. The insert I can get is slightly flexible.

    Premier Icon northernsoul
    Full Member

    if the lens moved or vibrated

    That’s never been an issue in my case (I have BBB Select Optic PH, £60 from Cycle Republic). My eyelashes sometimes touch the insert, which can be annoying. If I just did road cycling I’d probably wear them much more, but to be honest, for my regular mtb outings I always use normal sunglasses ahead of them, which probably says something about how enjoyable they are to wear.

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    I’ve got some Rad8 mudhugger prescription glasses. They have transition lenses and a pretty darned good anti fog coating. I sweat like a good un and ride year round in Scotland … they very rarely fog up. Mebbes not as good optically as Oakley glasses but pretty fantastic for me 2 years in.

    +1 but 3 years in, so comfy I don’t notice I’m wearing them & std 504s rather than the MH version

    Premier Icon tomparkin
    Free Member

    Another +1 for contact lenses. Your friendly local optician should be able to sort out a free trial so you can see how it works out for you.

    My prescription is relatively strong, so I’d need higher refractive index lenses in any prescription sports glasses to avoid them being too heavy; and that gets reasonably expensive.

    I have in the past ridden in my normal glasses, and that’s just awful: the frames weren’t designed for riding, and were forever slipping down or getting bumped around. And MTB isn’t kind to lenses or frames — I ended up more or less writing mine off!

    I ended up going for daily disposable contact lenses, paired with various sets of safety specs. The latter are designed to keep high-speed crap out of your eye, and are cheap enough that if you trash them it’s no big deal. Plus you can take them off if you like (because you can still see using your contacts!); and you can get different lenses for different conditions.

    Downside is that it’ll probably be more expensive overall for me in about two year’s time v.s. buying prescription sports specs; and contacts are sometimes a PITA if you need to put one back in trailside.

    Premier Icon dahedd
    Free Member

    Ive been looking at these. I like how they can send you a non prescription pair to test out first. I’ve a real trouble with the combination of glasses & helmets giving me severe head aches or rubbing together & actually marking the sides of my head. Weird shaped head apparently.

    They’re certainly not cheap but I might have to bite the bullet

    Premier Icon mick_r
    Full Member

    I use the sportier versions of Uvex prescription safety glasses (need them for work in a lab so the old work pair becomes my bike set). About £80 ish, but do find the rubbery bits go a bit crumbly so not the greatest quality.

    Work fine apart from heavy rain or certain weird humid drizzle conditions.

    Premier Icon claudie
    Full Member

    Another rad8 fan, for me the main part is 0 and the bottom portion is +2. I use them for bikes, running and walking, I can now read my Garmin again

    Premier Icon bent udder
    Full Member

    I’m pretty shortsighted and can’t stand contacts, despite several attempts to get them fitted. I started out with Eassuns with a lens carrier, then onto Adidas Evil Eye and others – as said above the lens carrier approach means lots of fogging.
    I went to Optilabs about ten years ago and they have been excellent – really, really helpful, great customer service and just basically lovely people to deal with.
    Recently I got old enough that my shortsightedness as reduced, and it’s now possible for me to get some nice sunnies without ending up with an Eddie the Eagle look. So I bought a couple of pairs of blanked Oakley Crossfire frames and had them glazed at Cillary Blue – one set clear, the other as sunglasses. I had transitions lenses with the Optilabs ones, and I’d probably not do that again. They never go fully dark and are just a bit weird all round!

    One thing I’d say: After years or running inserts or just riding in my normal bins, dedicated glasses make a massive, massive difference. No watering eyes, better clarity when looking at stuff that’s not in the centre of your vision, all-round so much better. Worth every penny.

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    Rudy Rydon with an Rx insert here. I’m +5 so can’t have glazed Oakley or the like. They are great. Occasionally prone to steaming on wet days. Some distortion but the brain corrects that quickly.

    I’ve worn contacts and they are fine. Daily disposable are excellent. I’m now +6 for varifocals, but being outdoors, my vision is normally good enough when light enough to not need them. I can’t read a Garmin in the dark though. Even the 810 on largest font. I won’t wear my best non-cycling glasses when riding (Oakley carbon-Ti actually) in case they get broken! I do commute on them though. The lenses would buy a nice set of cycling glasses. That’s the price of EACH lens.

    Premier Icon Jordan
    Full Member

    I’m just trying the contacts route myself. Just finished my weeks free trial and signed up for a years supply on direct debit. My eyes are fairly sensitive so I couldn’t cope with the cheaper ones. The difference in comfort between them and more expensive ones is night and day but even so I can only comfortably wear them for eight hours or so. This might improve though as I get more used to them. Anyway, for this reason I have been advised just to wear them occasionally so perfect for days out biking or hiking. Had my first day out with them on sunday for a hike up Ingleborough and it was great to have clear views of the scenery with a nice wide field of vision. Looking forward to trying them on the bike this sunday hopefully.

    So, for anyone thinking of going this route for occasional bike wear. Vision express have an offer at the moment where if you sign up by direct debit you get the first three months sets at half price and you can stop your DD at any time. You pay for the first three months up front but in that time you could have enough pairs for over a year of occasional use.

    I’ll probably still get a pair of the cheap prescription riding riding glasses though for shorter rides when it’s not worth using a set of contacts.

    Can anyone tell me what the field of vision is like on some of the ones mentioned above? As someone else commented I usually end up looking over the top of riding glasses when descending so was wondering if it will still be the same with some of those mentioned.

    Premier Icon UK-FLATLANDER
    Full Member

    I use Rudy Project Rydon and Agon both with inserts and a -10ish prescription, no issue with fogging 99% of the time and no slippage.

    Premier Icon saintsludge
    Full Member

    I went short sighted in my early 20’s, 20 years ago now. I’ve been doing Ortho K with IGO lenses the last 7 years and i find it fantastic.

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