Please help settle an argument about interviews and the law…

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  • Please help settle an argument about interviews and the law…
  • crikey
    Member

    If you want to sleep in the garage, or make your own tea for the rest of the year, perhaps you might think carefully about the right answer to give her.

    user-removed
    Member

    Pffft. I’m her only slave. No P45 for me.

    crikey
    Member

    It’s not as black and white as either of you think; scoring systems allow interviewers to demonstrate that the process was fair and above board, but there is wiggle room in every good scoring system.

    Interviews are about sorting people; set the bar high enough so that you can choose 5 or 10 candidates, then use the interview to sort them into the order you want.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    I don’t think its a legal requirement – but it gives the employer a leg to stand on if they’re later accused of any impropriety. I’ve found it more common in things like procurement than recruitment – but in that situation the method used to score is stated at the outset.

    I’ve not really had many jobs but I’ve never been on in an interview situation (either side of the table) where any kind of score system was involved

    dovebiker
    Member

    No need for a scoring system, but employer may need to demonstrate in the case of an appeal they were not biased in terms of gender, age, disability, ethnicity, sexual orientation or other protected characteristics. Using a common set of questions pertinent to the role, objective criteria and keeping notes from each interview.

    km79
    Member

    “Oh, I preferred the cut of candidate X’s jib – he was a better fit”

    Which is like scoring him high on how he fits. If how he fits is an important factor then that score can be weighted. No need to record such a thing but it is easy to justify should the need arise.

    user-removed
    Member

    Interesting, ta. I still reckon you could reasonably claim that a candidate’s interpersonal skills weren’t up to scratch (or some such bollocks) and be fairly safe, providing due diligence can be shown throughout the process…

    Needless to say, she’s still 100% correct.

    Premier Icon Pik n Mix
    Subscriber

    If it is I totally screwed up the interview I held today! I gave them the job though.

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    If someone turned up wanting a job in my shop with **** off tattooed on their forehead would I have to go through the interview process or just ask them to look in the mirror?
    Yes I have seen someone with **** off tattooed on their forehead.

    mattyfez
    Member

    Ive scored people on basic stuff with notes next to it, like ability 5 out of 10 but good aptitude to learn, attitude one out of ten, bit of a dick etc, helps remember afterwards when considering people as it can be hard.

    Didn’t think it was a requirement through, just helpful to me. Unsuccessful candidates are simply told they’ve been unsuccessful on this occasion, stiff competition, we’ll keep you on file, via email, keep it simple.

    I still reckon you could reasonably claim that a candidate’s interpersonal skills weren’t up to scratch (or some such bollocks) and be fairly safe, providing due diligence can be shown throughout the process…

    As long as your interviews are standard for all, as far as can be, you can always find a way to NOT employ someone you don’t like. Now, is that a good thing or a bad thing? Tough one. However, if you decide you simply don’t like one candidate, for whatever reason, there’s always going to be a legally acceptable way to can them.

    Premier Icon ads678
    Subscriber

    I was the only one interviewed for my job, I’d have been gutted if I’d have lost out on a scoring system!!

    crikey
    Member

    ‘Big norks’ is apparently not one of the things we are allowed to score on.

    km79
    Member

    ‘Big norks’ is apparently not one of the things we are allowed to score on.

    You can if having them is a job requirement. Eg bra design & manufacturing company looking for a large breasted model for testing purposes.

    Junkyard
    Member

    dovebiker wrote:

    No need for a scoring system, but employer may need to demonstrate in the case of an appeal they were not biased in terms of gender, age, disability, ethnicity, sexual orientation or other protected characteristics. Using a common set of questions pertinent to the role, objective criteria and keeping notes from each interview.

    THIS and THIS

    . However, if you decide you simply don’t like one candidate, for whatever reason, there’s always going to be a legally acceptable way to can them.

    An interview is essentialy discrimination – or why do they just give them a job. the test is to prove the criteria used were not discriminatory

    ie no blacks will fall foul of this
    Not having **** off tattooed on head for customer facing role probably wont though i would call it “presentability” or able to represent the business to stakeholders or some such dross to justify it.

    user-removed
    Member

    My wife insists that a potential employer has to use a scoring system when interviewing for a job (say, a carpet salesman) or possibly end up in court. I reckon the employer is perfectly within his / her rights to just say, “Oh, I preferred the cut of candidate X’s jib – he was a better fit”.

    Who’s right, or isn’t it black or white?

    Premier Icon BigDummy
    Subscriber

    ‘Big norks’ is apparently not one of the things we are allowed to score on.

    People at my first job fondly recalled the days of getting young women who interviewed to clasp their hands behind their heads and then walk at the wall, elbows first. Anyone whose elbows hit the wall before their “norks” did was out of luck.

    I think times have changed, slightly… 🙂

    poly
    Member

    Anyone who tells you something is illegal should be prepared to back it up with either the relevant legislation or the case law; most things people say are illegal are actually just bad practice.

    Using the phrase “cut of his jib” in a recruitment situation is bad practice, and if it could be shown it was likely a reference to a protected attribute could be illegal. Team fit is a slightly safer way of saying it 😉

    However, if the company has written down a set of policies and procedures for recruitment and selection, which include using a scoring system then whilst not illegal to ignore their own policies it does make it more likely for any “action” to succeed if they have ignored their own policies designed to avoid discrimination.

    Premier Icon rickmeister
    Subscriber

    Scoring is, I believe, more likely during a competency based interview which will have been suggested many times on threads, is best responded to with STAR type responses. These are generally more common in civil service roles where their own application form is used so the application process is controlled and the same for everyone and not dependent on a cv. Usually accompanied with an equal opportunity section on ethnicity, disability etc etc… Though it’s not exclusively like this.

    Some private sector employers take cv’s but use overt scoring and declare this on their websites, with tips for interview prep using star….

    It’s not exclusive to either sector….

    So your wife is absolutely correct in every respect even though she may not be correct actually…..

    bigdaddy
    Member

    Working in the social care sector I’ve always used scoring systems – always been really hot on being able to justify your decisions – not that I’ve actually ever had to do that. The application form is also scored to provide the short list. Given that’s the only way I’ve ever been recruited or carried out interviews I am unsure how you would make an objective decision without some form of scoring, but maybe that’s the lack of experience of any other way!

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