Plastering – shadow a plasterer or go on a course?

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  • Plastering – shadow a plasterer or go on a course?
  • creamegg
    Member

    Not sure where your based but Ty Mawr (near Brecon) do courses. I did a one day course with my mate and we plastered the whole of his house. Looks good too. If you want to learn about lime plaster, Ty Mawr is good for that. You could combine the training with a mtb trip

    ‘Both’ might be a good choice! Where are you gonna shadow a decent plasterer though?

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    I asked a plasterer if I could have a go once. Thinking “how hard can that be?” If the job required a really textured finish, lots of rough lines etc, I’d have been perfect for the job. 😆

    Not sure where your based but Ty Mawr (near Brecon) do courses. I did a one day course with my mate and we plastered the whole of his house. Looks good too. If you want to learn about lime plaster, Ty Mawr is good for that. You could combine the training with a mtb trip

    I like the cut of your jib. Trip to Wales would do the trick, but I doubt MrsFlyingOx would be too chuffed if she caught me loading the bike into the Jeep when I’m supposed to be off on a course…

    We’re in Edinburgh, house is an hour plus change away up near St Andrews. FIL knows plasterers through being a joiner up there, hence the idea of shadowing, but it’s a bit of a trek while we’re still down here. If that’s going to be the best experience though, that’s what I’ll do.

    TheBrick
    Member

    I did an evening course at a local college this summer term (£180 10 weeks, one evening 2hr an evening I think). Very good introduction. It really helped to have some one point out tips on how to plaster. I’d happily do a room now but I’d still be nervous about ceiling as I found them much harder and kept on getting lost.

    If you have an opportunity to labour for a plaster take it but if you can squeeze in a basic domestic level course do so as you will be able to learn the really basic stuff at college and not worry about waiting his time on a job then perfect your work with the plasterer / pick up more tips.

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    I learnt shadowing a really good plasterer and then practicing. It can be done with good results.I need Extremely good light to see what I am doing these days.

    You really don’t want to be practicing on your new house I did a few garages to get my hand in 😀

    We’re possibly in the process of moving into a fairly nice home, but it’s the sort that will require the loving touch of an artisan plasterer over the coming years as we upgrade/refit the place.

    I’m confident I can do the required work myself; I have a steady hand, the patience of a saint, a beer fridge, etc.
    I’m wondering, though, whether the best way to approach this is going to be some kind of local college course or following a plasterer around for a bit.

    Any plasterers in with some advice?

    Tom B
    Member

    Just pay a plasterer….my dad has done it for over 30 years and will retire little more than a cripple!!! One of the toughest jobs that there is imo.

    richc
    Member

    Its really easy to do a really bad job and takes years to get good. But if you don’t mind a rustic finish you could diy it…….

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Subscriber

    Just pay a plasterer….my dad has done it for over 30 years and will retire little more than a cripple!!! One of the toughest jobs that there is imo

    Couldn’t agree more. My dad retired with terrible arthritis. Actually since he quit he is probably more mobile now at 72 than at 60!

    Plastering is not easy, no matter what anyone says. It is one of the hardest in the building trade. I can patch to an acceptable (to me) degree but wouldn’t even think of trying a whole room. Unless you want that rustic look.

    See that’s the thing. Everyone looks at me and my employment history (in all its non-trade glory) and just says “get someone in”. They conveniently forget 3 things: I am by far and away the most accomplished amongst them artistically, I have a magnificent eye for detail, some of the steadiest hands in Western Europe, and an almost fanatical devotion to the pope.

    I’m not denying that it’s a skill that takes time to master, and I’m not in any way belittling those who have mastered it in stating the following, but I am 100% confident that I could become proficient enough to do my own home.

    I think, as mentioned above, it’s going to come down to a combination of community college course and shadowing. Ta for the advice.

    ebygomm
    Member

    I just taught myself, found it really satisfying to do.

    it’s nowhere near as difficult as most people will make out. watch some YouTube videos, read up and just have a bash somewhere unimportant. start with fresh boards or reskims, don’t even think about lathe and plaster and you’ll be fine

    user-removed
    Member

    I used to work with a chap whose mum drunk heavily throughout her pregnancy. He was slow. He left to do a plastering course, and partly out of pity, I hired him to do our back wall and ceiling. What a bloody brilliant job he made of it! If he can do it, anyone can. The course involved lots of practical stuff and going out with time-served workmen.

    marble plastering is even easier

    spchantler
    Member

    its hard work for sure, but its a different thing doing it day in day out, 2 walls at a time for 30 years, than a diyer doing one wall a day! i trained as a joiner, then watched a few plasterers and jumped in when i went self employed. now 10 years later i get a pretty good finish and can put 2 walls on at the same time without losing it. if you want some tips, like wetting corners on fresh walls, pm me.

    Chuck Morris
    Member

    I wanted to be a plasterer when I left school, ended up being a software developer. I got told it’s hard work and put off by people in the industry.

    I’m still tempted to learn myself, you should go for it. I don’t think you will become a cripple plastering your own home.

    Berm Bandit
    Member

    My daughters fella is an artisan plasterer. Spent 2 years at college plus on site experience. Can do the whole 9 yards from making mouldings, listed building type repairs and rennovations and so on and so forth.

    Personally, having seen the work and effort involved and the amount of skill it takes to do it properly I would just get a pro in. Best bet is to find someone, (normally by word of mouth), and then discuss what you want done and how to fit it in to suit the fella on £ notes basis.

    The girls lad is stacked like the proverbial brick outhouse, and frankly I have no idea how he actually manages the amount of work he does for what he earns from it.

    wors
    Member

    .my dad has done it for over 30 years and will retire little more than a cripple!!! One of the toughest jobs that there is imo.

    Yep, my dads shoulders are fooked from it, it’s hard graft. and those who say its easier than it looks, it ain’t.

    I’s pay someone to do it, to get a even a semi decent finish requires practise and practise and then some, i spent most of my school holidays watching him and trying, and if i try to do it it looks okay, but then next to my dads work, it’s crap!!

    yunki
    Member

    I reckon it depends what sort of finish you want..

    If you want a finish that looks amateurish then crack on (call the finish rustic or something maybe..?)

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    I’m confident I can do the required work myself; I have a steady hand, the patience of a saint, a beer fridge, etc.

    I have a mate who this would describe. He now does up houses full time for a living.

    In the end he says he has to pay third parties for 2 jobs. Connections to gas mains and plastering. I think he got Ok at plastering but he says as he is slower its still more cost effective to bring some one in

    Your mileage my differ

    richc
    Member

    If you are in the SouthWest I can recommend some plasterers who are very good (all they have ever done since they finished school at 15 and are now in their thirties), and not that expensive. They can be hard to book as they work 6 days a week 7am until 7pm to keep up with their diary.

    DIY is OK, but it *will* look shit to anyone who knows what they are looking at, because practice makes perfect same as everything and you will have very little experience.

    Berm Bandit
    Member

    In the end he says he has to pay third parties for 2 jobs. Connections to gas mains and plastering. I think he got Ok at plastering but he says as he is slower its still more cost effective to bring some one in

    Oh yeah did I mention that potential son in law is not a grunt, hes actually a very briight fella, and the plan is also to go into property development. His analysis of important skills was similar to this quote from ampthill, which is why he has gone off to learn one of them.

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