Picture the scene, you walk into your local branch of ******** and you see…

Home Forum Bike Forum Picture the scene, you walk into your local branch of ******** and you see…

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  • Picture the scene, you walk into your local branch of ******** and you see…
  • Edric 64
    Member

    He needs a bigger hammer then

    trail_rat
    Member

    Youd stab folk if you knew what went on behind closed doors im sure

    One mans solution is another mans bodge.

    If the post was the right size to push the bearing square out then whats the issue ? If i painted it blue and tipexed park on it would it be better ?

    Edric 64
    Member

    I wouldnt put it in the workstand ,Much of the force will be absorbed by the flex and movement of the bike and stand .I would put it on the floor and get help to hold it

    Premier Icon Stiggy
    Subscriber

    Where? Where? Where?

    boxfish
    Member

    Bike clamped by seatpost.
    Drifting seatpost at jaunty angle.
    Hammer too small (apparently).

    STATO
    Member

    A mechanic is a mechanic, dosnt matter where he works (usually). As TR said, even if you have the right tool, it still involves a hammer.

    Too much energy loss in that setup-a mahoosive twatting device would be needed for that!

    boxfish
    Member

    …up on the workstand is a Boardman EM1.7 with it’s chainset removed. Mr Mechanic then appears with a hammer and a seatpost and proceeds to attempt to drift out the NDS bearing from the BB shell by hammering the seat clamp with the post wedged against the bearing.

    This continues for a few minutes, unsuccessfully.

    As I wait patiently for my order to turn up, I casually ask why a bearing drift, or some other more suitable tool is not being used.

    “We’ve been asking for the proper tools for ages” came the response. Mr Mechanic then retrieved some other cylindrical object and continues to hammer away at the bearing.

    So I ask myself, would I be happy with a bike shop engaging in such hamfistery with my bike? No, I probably wouldn’t.

    ( To be fair, I didn’t hang around to find out what happened next and I’m not having a pop at the mechanic.)

    Am I just being a bit precious? 😉

    wobbliscott
    Member

    Isn’t a drift just a bit of tubing by a different name? Some might say it shows ingenuity. The very stuff that made this nation great, and the very stuff that now lacking making this nation less and less great than it used to be.

    nikk
    Member

    That kinda stuff going on when the bike is clamped to a workstand vis the seattube is poor mechanical sympathy IMHO.

    Press in bearings in a frame are also lame IMHO… ok if you are a paid up XC racer wanting to shave 5 grams, rubbish for everyone else.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Doing it square and supportin the structure to be twatted are important parts of it though

    To bodge you must first understand what yor trying to achieve and the restraints …… Your fella in halfords obviously doesnt . He is half way though – with careful tuition he will be good 🙂

    steve_b77
    Member

    Lets be honest, if he breaks it, he replaces it. As above, it’s a drift in all but name

    orangeboy
    Member

    You would be surprised how many “proper” cycle tools are designed with a hammer as part of the process
    A nice large seat post seems like a good drift if tbh only maybe with the seat
    Clamp end removed and plugged
    You can’t use somthing the full diameter o a bb30 bearing as the cir clips are in the way

    And a slide hammer tends to pull on only the very inner race

    How would you remove them ?

    Premier Icon benji
    Subscriber

    And a slide hammer tends to pull on only the very inner race

    And this is worse compared to bashing it with blunt instruments of brutality?

    Var do a very neat pulling solution for BB30 bottom brackets.

    orangeboy
    Member

    Does the var one have a tube that rests on the outside of the bb shell and marks the paint as the force of pulling the bearing out forces the tube onto the frame

    Premier Icon benji
    Subscriber

    Does the var one have a tube that rests on the outside of the bb shell and marks the paint as the force of pulling the bearing out forces the tube onto the frame

    Quite possibly, but I would prefer paint loss to brutality.

    Don’t see what’s wrong with a blind bearing puller and slide hammer solution, no chance of missing and hitting the frame, and is well proven for lots of other industrial bearing applications.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Oh right retard proof you mean , i cant think of one instance where ive hit a frame with a hammer by accident

    Premier Icon benji
    Subscriber

    You might not have, but someone at some point will.

    The other thing to consider is with a drift you aren’t exactly pushing the bearing in a parallel direction whereas with a blind puller/slide hammer it is.

    Be interesting to see how well BB30 frames age with respect to wear once they have had a few changes of bearings.

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    Var do a very neat pulling solution for BB30 bottom brackets.

    Neat end expensive. The Park Tool version works exactly the same as a headset removal tool as, well, press fit BBs are headsets turned through 90 degrees…! It’s also under £25 at trade. I have one. 🙂

    To be fair, a seat post is a reasonable item to use as a drift.

    orangeboy
    Member

    You have a good point regarding wear. We already have to glue some pf30 bb.
    I’ve never hit a frame with a hammer but did once drop the handle of a headset press onto a top tube
    Both the people I work have and caught there hands in the weight on my slide hammer

    IanW
    Member

    Having just removed the BB30 bearings (6806 by another name) from my new carbon Bianchi with a hammer and a screw driver and used the same tools to reinstall the new bearings.

    Same method as with cars and machinery etc. tiny taps….

    No need for a seatpost that’s just faff.

    uselesshippy
    Member

    A mate of mine works for BA as an aircraft engineer.
    In the mahoosive manual for a 747, is the line, several times, “gently release with a large hammer” 😯

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    From an Airheads article, originally posted on July 29, 2005

    HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

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