Out in the desert and just encountered my first…

Home Forum Chat Forum Out in the desert and just encountered my first…

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 76 total)
  • Out in the desert and just encountered my first…
  • Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    You’ll be there a while if you try to kill everything that’s deadly ๐Ÿ˜•

    Been here over a year and not seen much a few brown snakes and a couple of red backs, the odd evil centipede – but I looked down tonight and this was next to my foot. I don’t usually kill stuff but this bugger had it coming.

    mattk
    Member

    His missus is gonna be proper pissed off.

    Sleep well tonight!

    beckykirk43
    Member

    How big is (was) it?

    crikey
    Member

    I’m not entirely sure I support killing things just because you went there. If you’re in the desert, why not go to a bit of the desert where he wasn’t instead of killing him?

    I’m with the OP on this one. I’m not sure that spiders follow that ‘live and let live’ approach. Kill it, it serves as a warning to all the others.

    Premier Icon SaxonRider
    Subscriber

    Crikey + 1

    cranberry
    Member

    Can you imagine the grief of Mrs Deadly Spider, and the little Deadly Spiderettes, sat at home reading the Gruanidad, waiting for Mr Deadly Spider to come home with the tofu and mung bean salad ?

    How can you be such a heartless murderist of poor innocent, deadly ickle creatures?

    uselesshippy
    Member

    First time you see something,
    Then you kill it ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    crikey
    Member

    Hitting everything is not a particularly sustainable form of either travel or tourism, please give over.

    Funnel Web spider.

    Seeing as I’m an 8hr drive from the nearest town / hospital I thought is best to dispatch it before it gave someone a bit of a nip.

    Funnel web 0 – Shovel 1.

    I actually had to hit it three times in the end. Robust gits.

    Note: Photo taken prior to its fight with the shovel…

    allthepies
    Member

    So, about this “hippy” moniker…

    cranberry
    Member

    No, but should you find yourself a shovel’s length away from something that poses a real risk of serious illness or in extreme cases death 32 times faster than you could get to hospital, then batter it, and batter it good.

    Konastoner
    Member

    Bad Karma dude!

    Right next to your foot you say? Was this natures way of just letting you know you should be careful and to be more aware? If it was then next time the “creature” WILL bite! ๐Ÿ‘ฟ

    yunki
    Member

    Hitting everything is not a particularly sustainable form of either travel or tourism, please give over.

    yes it is.. and what’s more, it’s flipping well natural..

    he’s been in the desert over a year and killed one spider.. where as you have lived in the Uk, travelling around by mototrised vehicle killing untold thousands of insects on the windshield..

    utter utter bolsheviks being spouted here..

    Legoman
    Member

    My 7yo nephew was bitten by a blue ringed octopus on a Sydney beach yesterday. Sis didn’t realise what it was at first, but luckily someone else on the beach did – cue paramedics arriving very quickly and a blue- light dash to the nearest hospital.
    Thankfully he’s OK but apparently these things kill more people than sharks!

    Left me thinking – is the primary objective of all Australian wildlife simply to inflict painful death on passing humans??

    I’ve lived out here in this camp for probably 11 out of the last 13 months, and its more than likely that spider has travelled in one of the vans as they are not usually many out this far in to the desert. There is a good chance its come in to my bit of desert rather than the other way around. Im not a tourist or a traveller I work here. This is pretty much my back yard now, even the Traditional Owners who came out said I’d probably spent more time out here than them!

    I don’t by nature wantonly go round killing stuff, in fact I have been known on several occasion to relocate ants rather than kill them. I do however draw the line when I’m sitting having dinner and I look down and see a large (2″ body) funnel web striding purposefully towards my Jandal’d foot. Having had an allergic reaction to a wasp sting previously and it being 7.30pm and dark (I can only get helicopter evac for 8hrs a day during daylight hours) Im sorry to say I wasn’t going to give the little bugger the benefit of the doubt.

    Just to put it in perspective for me to evac someone from this camp after dark involves a minimum 5 – 6 hour off road drive to the tarmac, followed by another 2.5hrs to the nearest medical facilities. The risk involved in that to the casualty and the driver far out ways the life of a potential spider based hazard.

    Im approximately HERE

    Just left of the middle of nowhere (this is via satellite link)

    In recompense please accept this photo of the camp Goanna – he keeps the snakes away for us in a more natural manner:

    Even the grass (Spinifex) is pretty militant!

    Nephew is lucky a blue ringed octopus sting is pretty bad. It basically paralyses the respiratory system – there is no anti toxin, you just have to give cpr / resuscitation until the toxin wears off.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    That Goanna doesn’t look very camp to me. Is his feather boa out of shot?

    Premier Icon v8ninety
    Subscriber

    Kill it, and kill it good. Self defense, see? (did you consider the use of a shotgun?)

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    My brother in australia, talking to a native about spiders:
    Bro: “Oh man, I don’t like spiders”
    Local: “Oh yeah? You get poisonous ones in Scotland too?”
    Bro: “No but they… sort of scuttle around… and…”

    Spit Roast guana. Yaow!

    No way man we couldn’t eat Gojira! He’s practically an employee – he keeps the snakes away and the rodents down.

    roper
    Member

    I’m not into killing things, especially spiders and bugs, but sometimes you have too.
    The chances are, if it has travelled quite a way in a truck, from it’s normal habitat, to get to your camp, it could have died anyway. From what I know about it’s European and Asian cousins, funnel webs are quite susceptible to temperature or humidity changes. The Euro version digs quite a deep tunnel so it can control the temps it is hiding in by moving up or down depending on the outside temperatures. They are OK with the cold but die quite quickly when exposed to the summer sun.

    Personally I would have kept it. They are fascinating little things and quite interesting. Though unless you are confident with arachnids, it’s probably best to keep away.

    For future reference, they breathe with book lungs. This type of lung is very limiting, i.e. they can only move for short distances before they need to stop and take another breath. A full out charge would be quite short and staggered. Also they should not be able to climb smooth surfaces, so you should be ok with glass boots ๐Ÿ™‚

    Funnels webs are quite moody though and sometimes stridulate as a warning they are not happy or just don’t like your face.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    I’m actually more gobsmacked that someone can be sitting in a very remote wilderness like that and posting on a web forum. Technology really is awesome sometimes. Oh and I’d have smacked the wee beastie too ๐Ÿ™‚

    Premier Icon rickmeister
    Subscriber

    this photo of the camp Goanna

    Must be Joanna then…

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    Trying to see where you are on that map and for some reason streetview doesnt seem to work?

    qwerty
    Member

    It’s had the last laugh…. it was walking away from you… after laying its eggs in your ear…

    glupton1976
    Member

    So why exactly did you kill it?

    chewkw
    Member

    ๐Ÿ™„

    brakes
    Member

    if a big rabid snarling dog was hanging around inside your house and you had a shotgun would you 1) kill it 2) shoo it away 3) catch it and relocate it 4) let it hang around?

    geetee1972
    Member

    Man this thread is awesome!

    Please please please can we either have a full low down of the what the hell you’re going out there or the link to the STW thread or blog that must exist somewhere.

    The mind boggles on so many different levels with the unsaid things in this post!

    chewkw
    Member

    brakes – Member

    if a big rabid snarling dog was hanging around inside your house and you had a shotgun would you 1) kill it 2) shoo it away 3) catch it and relocate it 4) let it hang around?

    5. Lock myself in the room and call the dog catcher … let them have the rabid instead. ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜ˆ

    crikey
    Member

    Hmmm, but would we all be so happy if he’d gone to Tiger land and battered the first tiger he saw to death? Or maybe gone to that Artic and shot every polar bear just in case?

    …and wearing sandals in scary spider country, then getting upset because a spider came near….

    Give over.

    Premier Icon cloudnine
    Subscriber

    When i was working in Oz with a tree surgeon i was moving some branches and felt a twig get stuck in my hair (it was very long and tied back).. pull the twig out and looked at it ๐Ÿ˜ฏ It was a hairy and twitching spiders leg. I then grabbed the massive Huntsman from my neck and threw it.. then proceeded to run around screaming like a girl.

    Ive also had a very close encounter with a Wolf spider which dropped down on its web line and nearly landed on my shoulder.. it then dropped to the floor and reared up and started charging at me.. ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    Also.. was smashing up an aluminium window frame id placed in a skip.. frame was hollow and had about 20 sleeping redbacks in it. From a standing jump i clean jumped out of the skip and ran around screaming like a girl.

    Useful chart so you know which ones to run screaming away from…
    http://www.termite.com.au/spider-identification-chart.html

    yunki
    Member

    Shood’ve bummed it.. ๐Ÿ™„

    nickname
    Member

    A full out charge would…

    That’s enough for me *runs away like a girl*

    bwaarp
    Member

    No, but should you find yourself a shovel’s length away from something that poses a real risk of serious illness or in extreme cases death 32 times faster than you could get to hospital, then batter it, and batter it good.

    +1

    Too many hippys on this site.

    Gotta love STW – to all the do gooders, I’d love to see one crawl past your feet and observe you causally leave it alone and then happily snuggle down in your beds and drift peacefully off to sleep.

    …and wearing sandals in scary spider country, then getting upset because a spider came near….

    Give over.

    Get out of it, it’s the bush. Its not as if I went to the spider breeding centre and smeared fly jam over my toes and shouted “come and have a go if you think you’re venomous enough!’

    Its between 42 and 48C in the shade during the day and if your lucky gets down to 25C at night. After a day in steel toe cap boots you need to get them off. I’m not some scared Pom I know what’s out here (Brown snakes, Western Taipans etc) doesnt really worry me anymore. You take the appropriate precautions, in this case a poor lowely spider got flattened with a shovel. Would you rather I moved my foot let it run off and bite the next foot it came across. Its a matter of risk management. You don’t see the ozzies not wearing Jandals just because they are in spider country and I can assure you that they are probably quicker to kill anything they don’t like the look of.

    And if you have ever been to the Arctic you will know that you or a member of your party carry a rifle at all times in case of polar bears.

    Most of the stuff out here is pretty harmless, Huntsman, some Wolf spiders. There at least half a dozen Huntsman that live in the office van – keep the insects down. Also I got to witness an epic battle between a 4 or 5″ across huntsman and one of the massive moths we get out here. The Huntman bite off a bit more than it could chew and ended up with its legs wrapped around the still flying moth, which although it couldn’t again any altitude was still flying and made it out of the van, huntsman still hanging on. The spider did win in the end, Saw it dragging the moth back in a bit later.

    It was like Godzilla vs Mothra only smaller.

    iainc – Member
    I’m actually more gobsmacked that someone can be sitting in a very remote wilderness like that and posting on a web forum. Technology really is awesome sometimes. Oh and I’d have smacked the wee beastie too

    Yeah the sat system is pretty good, get phones and reasonable internet access. Via this:

    geetee1972 – Member
    Man this thread is awesome!

    Please please please can we either have a full low down of the what the hell you’re going out there or the link to the STW thread or blog that must exist somewhere.

    The mind boggles on so many different levels with the unsaid things in this post!

    I’m running a remote gold exploration project in the Pilbara region. Just doing some set up and so forth before drilling starts.

    My camp site is pretty basic – just a couple of caravans running off of a small generator. Only usually 2 or 3 of us out here until the program starts however I have been here on my own before. Pretty cool knowing the next nearest human is 200 odd km away.

    Stoner – Member
    Trying to see where you are on that map and for some reason streetview doesnt seem to work?

    Yeah Im afraid Google haven’t got round to bolting the camera to the top of a Landcruiser with 16ply tyres on yet. But I’m next to the gum tree, in that openinsh area between those sand dunes…

    It looks a little bit like this however:

    This is the core processing area:

    And a few more of the locals:

    Gojira (or possibly Rambo – its hard to tell them apart – but Gojira is bigger)

    Gecko that lives in the office caravan:

    Me sat on a bit of Ironstone Laterite trying to look like a Geologist:

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 76 total)

The topic ‘Out in the desert and just encountered my first…’ is closed to new replies.