• This topic has 60 replies, 35 voices, and was last updated 6 years ago by iolo.
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  • Our perception of the homeless
  • Premier Icon iolo
    Free Member

    A really interesting little experiment.

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1rwRT229Uo[/video]

    I especially found the other homeless guy looking for cash quite moving.

    Premier Icon Charlieboy28
    Free Member

    Seems the majority of comments miss the point. The reason I don’t give to beggars is that it maintains their situation by funding their addiction.. That’s why people walk on by I think
    The vast majority want to help people who need help
    I’m happy to buy a sandwich give a bus ticket etc but not buy for them their next bag of smack crack

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    The vast majority want to help people who need help

    How many of those people give to Shelter or similar charities.

    Premier Icon iolo
    Free Member

    A dear friend died a few years ago who, at one time in his life was homeless. We set up a just giving page to shelter and got nearly £500

    Premier Icon yunki
    Free Member

    My perception of the homeless has changed recently –

    Dave the local big issue seller, came to my 40th birthday do and it turned out he’s an excellent MC/rapper but a really creepy lech when he’s had a few

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    I’m happy to buy a sandwich give a bus ticket etc but not buy for them their next bag of smack crack

    Generally I give beggars what I’ve got in my wallet or pocket which is sometimes some coins, but sometimes its a couple of notes. The act of giving them the money ends the transaction as far as I’m concerned, what they do with their money is none of my business*

    *living on the street must be pretty tough, I’m not sure I wouldn’t get smacked to take the edge of it if I was in that situation.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    I totally confused a homeless guy in Derby last winter – he was asking for change near the station on a cold early evening. I figured he needed a warm drink more than cash, and popped back, bought him a hot chocolate and handed it to him.

    He didn’t know whether to thank me or throw it at me.

    I deal a lot with hostels and charities providing supported accommodation for the homeless for my work. I’ll support their efforts (all except for one) but I won’t give cash to people on the streets.

    Arguably this may drive them to crime, so my logic may be wrong.

    Premier Icon FeeFoo
    Free Member

    what they do with their money is none of my business

    Exactly right.

    Just give something, forget the social awkwardness and give.

    Premier Icon rogerthecat
    Free Member

    Came out of St Pancras last winter with a hot chocolate freshly made from Benugo to find a huge guy looking freezing begging for money for a hot drink, no one seemed to bat an eye at this so I gave him mine, he gave me hug that nearly broke my back. Never seen him since around that area, wonder what became of him.

    Too easy to be judgemental and suspicious, if I give things to a ‘wrong un’ every so often so be it, odds are that many will be grateful and it will help.

    Premier Icon Stoatsbrother
    Free Member

    what they do with their money is none of my business
    Exactly right.

    Just give something, forget the social awkwardness and give.

    But what we do with our money IS our business.

    I gave a cake of all things to a bloke on the mean streets of Lewes a few weeks back. He seemed very grateful.

    I don’t want to buy people fags booze or smack, and that’s my choice

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    Arguably this may drive them to crime, so my logic may be wrong.

    Its double edged. Begging puts you in a position where you reveal yourself as vulnerable and declare you’ve got some coins in your pocket, and that makes you an easy target for crime and exploitation. Thats why homelessness charities try to combat begging as its a catalyst for a whole lot of bigger problems than a bottle of white lighting and some fags.

    Premier Icon RaveyDavey
    Free Member

    We just used to give them any drugs we had left on our way home from the clubs

    Premier Icon Ladders
    Full Member

    I stopped giving money to Homless people when I saw one pull out a mobile phone as I walked by a few years ago.

    Bought a homeless guy who used to beg at our offices a box of mince pies at Christmas though. The £30 my boss gave him to buy a pair of work shoes for a job interview never got spent on the shoes though!

    Premier Icon DezB
    Full Member

    There’s a campaign in Bournemouth at the moment, persuading people to not give money to the homeless. “You kindness can kill” is the rather dramatic slogan.

    Premier Icon Pook
    Full Member

    I’ve variously given
    – a t shirt
    – coca cola
    – hot chocolate
    – change
    – paid a taxi fare
    and most recently bought a pint of milk, some ham slices, cheese slices and bread rolls for a homeless girl in sheffield the other week. she just said she was desperate for a a drink of milk and something to eat.

    Sometimes people who are down on their luck just need to know that people care. I reckon that can be enough to give them a step up. Maybe i’m naive.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    take home:

    Too easy to be judgemental and suspicious, if I give things to a ‘wrong un’ every so often so be it, odds are that many will be grateful and it will help.

    Really needed to hear someone say that.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    I stopped giving money to Homless people when I saw one pull out a mobile phone as I walked by a few years ago.

    Yeah I stopped eating altogether because once bit into a mouldy tomato.

    Premier Icon brakes
    Free Member

    we have the odd beggar in the town that I live in. from the looks of them they seem to make a reasonable amount out of it.
    there’s a bit of a turf war going on between them and the influx of Romanian accordion players who have a penchant for bus shelters.

    Premier Icon jambourgie
    Free Member

    If I’ve got some shrapnel in my sky-rocket I’ll give it. ‘There but for the grace of god’ etc… I don’t care what they spend it on, whatever makes their situation a little more bearable. And as Pook pointed out, I think it’s important to show them that some people care.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    I give £20 a month to Shelter, but I don’t give money to people on the street.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Full Member

    Two incidents on this:

    A friend bought a homeless guy (who was asking for “money for some food”) a Boots meal deal, he said “can’t I have the cash?”, and flatly refused it.

    A chap approached myself and a friend at a station and asked for “change for a cup of coffee”, friend (meaning well) said “I’ll just buy you a coffee”, homeless gent squared up to him and said “you think you’re so clever don’t you!?” before skulking off.

    Donations to Shelter, material gifts and even buying the Big Issue I’m ok with, but wouldn’t just give cash to someone who asked.

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    i’d prefer to buy a couple of sarnies, ask if can sit and join in watch the world go by for 10 mins, offer a sandwich and cuppa. It’s often good to talk to people. Then you’ll have a better idea what to do, if to give money, advice, assistance, or even just make a new friend or make someone (including self) feel more human as they are, after all. It often makes me feel more human, it’s easy to pass people by these days and that man or woman sitting in a shop doorway is often arguably more ‘human’ than the 100s of people who skip past or throw a quid.

    Premier Icon mudshark
    Free Member

    It will do more good to donate to charity; not saying this is common but does mean the money goes to where it will do the most good:

    Beggars earning £73,000-a-year

    Premier Icon globalti
    Free Member

    There’s been a guy making noises on a tin whistle, complete with shivering dog, outside the shopping mall in Bury for as long as I can remember – it must be ten years, easily. I can’t understand why he hasn’t managed to find a job.

    My son once gave a beggar a Mars bar; the bloke took it then jumped up and ran over to a black Range Rover that had stopped. Said “been waiting ages for you” and jumped in the back door. Cue one disillusioned young man.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Full Member

    I stopped giving money to Homless people when I saw one pull out a mobile phone as I walked by a few years ago.

    Right, so the guy has got himself a potentially very cheap PAYG phone, a fairly essential item if he wants to find a job and get back on his feet, as well as staying in contact with others while he is on the street.

    Not sure why that would put you off helping. Does he need to have absolutely nothing and no hope to be worth helping?

    Premier Icon jon1973
    Free Member

    I gave half a denarii to a beggar the other week. He wasn’t at all grateful. There’s no pleasing some people.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Full Member

    Spot the logical fallacy:

    Sgt Adrian Underwood, of Leicestershire Police, said: “On a good Friday or Saturday, some can pick up £200.”

    Even if you believe that surprisingly high figure, that isn’t remotely “equal to a £73,000-a-year salary tax free” because not all Fridays and Saturdays are “good” and rumour has it that five other days also exist.

    It’s almost like The Metro have deliberately extrapolated that soundbite into the most outrageous headline they could manage.

    Premier Icon jambourgie
    Free Member

    There’s a lot of talk about the homeless ‘getting a job’ etc. It’s a bit like trying to shove a square peg into a round hole if you ask me. Not all certainly, but I should imagine some homeless people are there because they simply can’t cope with the ‘normal’ way of life; the rent – the forms – the routine – the endless bureaucracy.

    Premier Icon iolo
    Free Member

    Range Rovers, not giving due to mobile phones, are some of you guys actually believing this stuff you’re writing?
    Sleeping in negative number temperature, constantly scared of being robbed, beaten up or worse. Most of the time through no choice of their own. Many have mental illness, turn to drink and drugs just to try and numb the life they lead.
    Maybe some of you guys would like to sleep on the street in mid January to see what it’s like.

    Premier Icon jambourgie
    Free Member

    Exactly,

    I think the whole “I don’t give to tramps because they’re all secret millionaires” is just an excuse*.

    *for being a tight-fisted selfish git.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Full Member

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0gA2mxbjSY[/video]

    (and yes I know the bloke is an actor but they do that for real without cameras)

    Premier Icon El-bent
    Free Member

    There’s a campaign in Bournemouth at the moment, persuading people to not give money to the homeless. “You kindness can kill” is the rather dramatic slogan.

    Reads more like, “we don’t want them here”.

    There’s been a guy making noises on a tin whistle, complete with shivering dog, outside the shopping mall in Bury for as long as I can remember – it must be ten years, easily. I can’t understand why he hasn’t managed to find a job.

    He’s become “institutionalised.” That’s our fault for not giving a monkeys about the down and outs in our “society”, and that careless attitude is justified by claiming, they are on drugs, alcohol or making a fair bit of money.

    Well perhaps they are. This could have been nipped in the bud if we gave a monkeys.

    Premier Icon dragon
    Free Member

    Seen a guy outside Oxford station ordering drugs on his mobile phone. Also clamped a Big Issue sellers car after he left in the private car park of one of the biggest solicitors in Wales

    I’ve never given money to the homeless. Tried giving food but it’s always been rejected. My local church when I was a kid made a big thing of always trying to help them with shelter, food, advice, charity etc. but never money as it would just get wasted.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    I gave half a denarii to a beggar the other week.

    The blonde lass from Game of Thrones?

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    because they simply can’t cope with the ‘normal’ way of life; the rent – the forms – the routine – the endless bureaucracy.

    You forgot the hours of browsing internet forums whilst at work…..

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    I can’t understand why he hasn’t managed to find a job.

    How many jobs do you reckon are available to someone who looks (and smells) like Captain Birdseye’s mad uncle?

    I appreciate that there will be some who don’t want to work, but for those who do it must be nigh on impossible to break the cycle. What are you going to do, ask for his CV?

    Premier Icon DenDennis
    Free Member

    yeah I used to drop people the odd change but now feel OK to walk by without giving stuff in the street knowing my middle class guilt is appeased by my ongoing monthly direct debit small donations to various charities.

    I buy the big issue very occasionally though less than i used to as the price seems to be quite high now.
    I’ve fallen for the old ‘its my last copy, is there any way i can just have the cash and keep the mag’ trick once too (realising later that it wasnt an official seller, just someone who found a used copy).

    Premier Icon jambourgie
    Free Member

    I’ve never given money to the homeless. Tried giving food but it’s always been rejected. My local church when I was a kid made a big thing of always trying to help them with shelter, food, advice, charity etc. but never money as it would just get wasted.

    But who the hell are you to say whether it’s wasted? Why shouldn’t they spend it on booze/smokes/drugs? If it makes their miserable life slightly more bearable. Food?… food is everywhere in this throwaway society. Go in the big bins behind any supermarket and you’ll find as much food as you want.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    who the hell are you to say whether it’s wasted? Why shouldn’t they spend it on booze/smokes/drugs?

    And besides, what were you going to spend it on?

    Premier Icon thestabiliser
    Free Member

    Having done a spell a spell as the receptionist in homeless offenders unit all this ‘get a jobbery’ boils my piss. These are people with serious, multiple problems and no amount of stiff upper lip bollox or well meaning sympathising is going to make the difference for them. They need properly funded support from health and social welfare professionals – but we’d have to pay for for that, so its not going to happen. These people get very little support because of the resources involved. Shelter have nothing to do with rough sleepers as their problems are too intractible and instead focus on people in short term accommodation (worthy in itself) but there’s a peception that rough sleepers are supported by a big organisation which they aren’t.

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