One – Ten. Why?

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  • One – Ten. Why?
  • You’ve missed out the cost of a new N-doooroh specific fluorescent wardrobe.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    I’m sticking with 3 speed Sturmey Archer.

    soobalias
    Member

    damn – didnt realise it was for N-duro.

    mods, please move to the recycling ares.

    Premier Icon colin9
    Subscriber

    Less clutter on the bars!

    munrobiker
    Member

    Saved me 1lb in weight of an already very light bike without costing me a million pounds, as well as a whack of maintenance costs. I converted to 1x when 9 speed was about but found the lowest gear a touch too high for my riding in the Highlands. Then 10 speed turned up and meant I could have a lower gear and not have massive jumps in gear ratio, and save a lot of weight.

    Made perfect sense to me. Having big wheels making a bike handle in a way that spoils my enjoyment of riding a bike did not.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    so is it all fasion? Or have i missed something.

    an ‘h’ 😉

    As long as you can get the range you want with one front chainring then why bother with the other two. I’ve foudn it’s a lot more reliable in mud as you’ve lost so much gubbins that used to collect mud and try and jam the chain.

    I just run my standard 9 speed 32T cassette and a 34 front round here on my 29er and it’s been fine. So total cost was a £30 chain device (no clutch mech) and a new front ring. On my Liteville I use their lower device and no upper one.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Less clutter on the bars!

    …to make room for dropper remote, rear shock lockout and fork lockout levers!

    bluebird
    Member

    All you ‘need’ to do is change the chain ring and shorten the chain. As opposed to a minimum of new frame/fork/wheels/tyres.

    If you hardly use the granny then your not losing much, but if you go to 650b are you gaining much?

    Personally I have no problem with 650b or 29″. I just don’t see enough of an advantage to justify spending £2k upwards until I need/want a new bike.

    Premier Icon ads678
    Subscriber

    Change stuff as it wears out and eventually have less stuff to get worn out and need replacing. Whats not to get?

    As long as you’re fit/strong enough to get up the hills that is*.

    *I’m still running 2×9 on my main bike!! 😳

    Premier Icon amedias
    Subscriber

    “The Man” introduces a slightly different wheel size and its all pitchforks and bitching, but people seem to be sucking up the drivetrain shi(f)t like its a) an improvement and b) its necessary

    buy a new thick thin chainring, change the chain and cassette at the same time as they were slightly worn, then replace your rear mech with a clutch type

    The parts are all consumables, and easily retro-fittable to existing bikes, and the existing 2x and 3x options are still available so not being forced, hence no bitching.

    then swap some of the sprokets on the perfectly good cassette so you can put a huge low gear in

    This bodge is only needed if you either can’t cope with a standard 11-36 cassette, or don’t want to go for one of the proper big-cassette options.

    You might be missing nothing, only you can say after trying it, it might not be appropriate for you or your riding, but for a lot of riders it satisfies all their gearing needs while simplifying their drivetrain and losing weight.

    Plenty of people have been running 1×8 and 1×9 for years, now its even better as there’s less compromise on the gearing and better chain retention.

    robinlaidlaw
    Member

    It saves some weight, often makes the bike run quieter, cleans up the controls on the bar and helps to give the bike that satisfying feeling of using something that is exactly fit for job at hand with nothing extraneous.
    If none of these things appeal to you, it’s not for you, I like it for all of these reasons. On the weight aspect, going from a 2×10 with a bash and chain device to 1×10 with no bash (no longer needed) and a much simpler chain device I saved a little over a pound off my bike, enough to be noticeable. If you don’t have a bash and device on your 2x or 3x set-up the weight saved will be a good bit less.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    i like the new shimano 10speed stuff, as it uses more ‘cable-pull’ per gear shift.

    (now 5mm per shift, was 2.5mm per shift)

    this means that my gears are much, much, much less sensitive to friction, muck, stretch, flex, etc.

    tis brilliant i tell thee.

    And if i lived somewhere less hilly, i’d probably be ok without a granny ring.

    Premier Icon AlexSimon
    Subscriber

    Loads of similar threads already.
    Basically – 10 is enough if you don’t care about pedalling down road hills. Then you save about a pound in weight and have a simpler system.

    If someone made a 1×11 with a cheap cassette, I would have that instead.

    As manufacturers embrace 1x systems, they have more flexibility with design allowing more compact rears, more clearance, etc, etc.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    There have been 1xN drivetrains on MTBs for aaaagggeees, you’ve just not been paying attention to them.

    I had a 1×7 setup in the 90s, if anything “The Man” took a good 15 years to catch up and start offering any reasonable, Specific 1xN drivetrain solutions, Saint was one of the first groups with a single ring specific chainset wasn’t it? And even then you still needed a chain device which made it noisier and draggier and the widest spread cassette about was 11-32t, so it was mostly just for “Gravity fed riding”…

    But then 10 speed cassettes gave us an extra 4 teeth, closely followed by NW chainrings and clutched mechs all of those things happened in relatively quick succession and SRAM sort of demonstrated that a 1xN drivetrain could “do it all” (well most of it) so a few people coppied that idea as a retrofit for 10speed, and the whole thing has kicked off again, only this time round the spread of gears is about enough for a moderately fit rider to winch himself up his local hills on…

    Working it out my 1×10 drive actually has a lower gear than my first proper MTB did and that had a triple chainset, OK the top gear is also quite spinney by comparison but then I never actually needed a 113 inch gear offroad and I have a road bike now for riding on the road so it really doesn’t feel like I’ve “Lost” anything other than complexity and a maintenance task….

    soobalias
    Member

    Ive been watching the 1×10 revolution/evolution on here for sometime and Im a little mystified really.

    “The Man” introduces a slightly different wheel size and its all pitchforks and bitching, but people seem to be sucking up the drivetrain shi(f)t like its a) an improvement and b) its necessary

    Seems like you can lose a shifter, cable, mech, a granny ring and potentially a bash ring.
    For that all you need to do is, buy a new thick thin chainring, change the chain and cassette at the same time as they were slightly worn, then replace your rear mech with a clutch type, then swap some of the sprokets on the perfectly good cassette so you can put a huge low gear in. After that all you might need is a chain device and it will all work.

    so is it all fasion? Or have i missed something.

    ska-49
    Member

    My Kona came with 2×10, inc. clutch mech. I found that I never used the granny but the 38t outter was a bit much. All I had to do was remove rings, shifter and front mech, attach thick/thin chainring and remove a few links.
    Cost me £35, saved some weight and have a more suitable gear range.

    Normally have about 4-5 miles each way on road before getting on the trails and hence having the top end to get this out of the way quickly is very useful. Would drive me bonkers twiddling away in 32:11. I could go bigger yes, but then I’d never get up the hill of the bit I actually want to ride.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    Ive been watching the 1×10 revolution/evolution on here for sometime and Im a little mystified really.

    It’s really quite simple. You see, other people aren’t you…
    🙂

    fr0sty125
    Member

    I’ve never like front mechs I love the simplicity of 1x

    robinlaidlaw
    Member

    It’s not for everybody but I think everyone tends to forget that we are a diverse bunch, with very different fitness levels and preferences, riding in very different locations, on extremely varied bikes. What works very well for some or many may be a total no-no for others. It doesn’t mean it’s not a good idea, just that it doesn’t suit you and your riding. There’s a good few folk on here for instance who seem to get on fine with single speed MTBs that’d be almost entirely useless to me, doesn’t mean it that it doesn’t suit them. Likewise, a lot of folk will insist that a 36t ring and 11-36 is the best option for 1×10 and all that you need. Not for me it’s not.

    Jamie
    Member

    1×9 is where it’s at.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    I started off with 48/16 SS gear on my CX/road type thing, then put an 11-34 cassette on the back when I wanted a few gears for a hilly off road ride. The cassette stayed on, which worked has worked out fine on road and off. Ion’t need more range for the rides I do. If I decided to get a front mech and a double, it would be because I wanted less of a gap between the gears.

    When the 10 year old mech started to tell me to retire it, I replaced it with a clutchy one, which meant I could ditch the chain device. Just running a normal SS tall tooth ring, no drops.

    _tom_
    Member

    I was skeptical of narrow wide ring + clutch mech working but it’s not bullshit, it actually works really well. I haven’t dropped a chain yet. I’ve never liked front mechs and 32t front with a 36-11 cassette seems to work well for me. Would probably want a granny if I was doing massive climbs all the time but most of them are fine on what I have. I hate clutter and complications so this is perfect for me. No need for a chain guide yet.

    hypnotoad
    Member

    You don’t have to go to 10 speed if you want to run a clutch mech.

    I’m running 1×8 and I’m happy with it, but I’m also running an a bash just in case the chain drops, which it hasn’t yet.

    iolo
    Member

    So granny gear is for wimps now and big ring is too big? The weight you lose in 1x whatever can be lost by emptying the 5 year old crap in your camelback and having a shit pre ride.
    Enduro bikes look cool but how many of you guys actually won an Enduro on one? How many of you guys wished you had a downshift to get your knackered legs up the hill?

    Jamie
    Member

    Someone got out of the wrong side of the bed today.

    matther01
    Member

    No FD to piss about with anymore, more room for a dropper remote, decent weight saving and an incentive to actually work harder, gain fitness and lose weight off your own body too. What’s not logical about it all? Perhaps 3x and 2x are the gimmicks like 650b?

Viewing 27 posts - 1 through 27 (of 27 total)

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