Viewing 27 posts - 1 through 27 (of 27 total)
  • One for the Type 1 Diabetics; FreeStyle Libre2 – just about to start!
  • Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    Recently had my first diabetes clinic appointment in a few years and they’ve finally talked me into trying the Freestyle Libre2 system; sensor arrived today and I’m having the webinar training tomorrow so I can get it added to my long list of repeat prescriptions.

    I googled how much the sensors are (yes NHS Scotland is amazing) and besides the cost of the sensor I also saw lots of adverts for adhesive covers and protective skins for them.

    I don’t have anywhere near as active a lifestyle as I used to have and don’t swim so is the sensors coming off an issue or are they quite adhesive and do indeed stay on for the two weeks?

    Aside from that are you quite happy with the system and has it made a difference?

    Premier Icon fossy
    Full Member

    We self funded one for my son for a few years but the cost mounted up. They are good though. Syncs to your phone too.

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    @fossy I can fully appreciate the cost if you have to fund it yourself! I’ve only known of kids (I’m a secondary teacher) that have it and I know that good diabetes management at that age is arguably more crucial than at any other.

    I didn’t realise until last week that it used your smartphone; I’d always thought they needed yet another blood sugar level meter or pump to talk to!

    Premier Icon qwerty
    Free Member

    Fantastic piece of kit, lots of clever app functions & sharing of info (alerts / alarms etc), helps anticipate where your numbers are headed.

    *I’m not a IDDM but use them daily*

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    No need for any skins or covers. Adhesive is plenty good enough. In fact you’ll still be scrubbing the residue for another two weeks after removing it!
    Have had a couple come off (over 4 years) but only after catching an edge on door frame. Called Abbott and said they’d came off and they were replaced for free.
    It’s an overused phrase but they really are life changing. If you do have a bad day and run high, I’d still finger prick before calculating a correction dose. I’ve found if my bm goes above 12, the sensor starts to overread.

    Premier Icon BigR
    Free Member

    Rarely had a problem with a sensor coming off. They are much more useful with an additional Bluetooth transmitter that sends the readings to your phone and apps can speak to a garmin watch. Great if you are out cycling/kayaking. Google ‘bubblan’. Huge improvement over finger-pricks and I think will eventually replace them despite the lag.
    Downside is alarms can begin to do your head in….

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    My daughter has lost 2 sensors in 2 years. In both cases Abbott replaced them FOC. She doesn’t use a cover.

    Sun cream brought one off during sensor application. Makes sure that your arm is very clean.

    Premier Icon fossy
    Full Member

    We had the early libre and used it with a bluecon transmitter. I had to set up a web page and software on my sons android but the instructions were clear. I could also see his readings remotely. This was before the newer device.

    He has a medtronic pump and keeps getting the CGM dangled at him, but the local Trust hasn’t prescribed it. Lots of promises, but ‘maybe next time’. His control isn’t great at 20 and eating junk.

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Full Member

    Libre 2 doesn’t really need the extra transmitter as once paired to reader or phone it can alert you if bloods go out of range (but does rely on a constant Bluetooth connection).

    Also, phone will sync to cloud and you can use a support app to get the readings on your own phone, so again, no need for additional stuff.

    It has come on massively since it first launched and as been said, it can be life changing.

    I’ve no issues with them unsticking and I’m quite partial to a 3 hour hot bath. Only times I’ve lost one is through my own stupidity and cutting the door too close and catching my sensor.

    Premier Icon j4mie
    Free Member

    I’ve had the first version for about 2 years and it has been life changing for me, my diabetes management is better than it has ever been – and I’ve had diabetes for 30 years! Every other diabetic I know who’s tried/been given them has reported the same.
    I keep meaning to call the hospital to get upgraded to the new version but never quite got around to it. Can only be another advantage.

    Good luck with it!

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Full Member

    The ‘upgrade’ should happen automatically as Abbott have stopped making the first version and now only do the Libre 2…the Libre 3 is apparently out in some markets and likely to be coming ‘soon’ to mainstream users. Cost for Libre 2 is the same as the first Libre so no cost difference.

    I’m a bit miffed that they don’t do swabs in the Libre 2 – mainly as I haven’t ordered swabs for years so need to go find a supply. The ones in the Libre seemed to be very good – I swab my arm, let it dry and apply the sensor and it stays solid for the 14 days, so I’m assuming the swab is doing a decent clean with the wipe.

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    Agree about the swabs. We buy them by the 100 off eBay and they’ve been OK. We use 2 at a time. She cleans her arm with one, then cleans it again with another Finally I wipe her second swab on my arm. Once my arm is dry we know that it is safe to apply the sensor. A wet arm caused our other “non sun cream” failure.

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    Thanks all for your comments and reassurance! It does indeed sound like it is the way forward; 27yrs a Type 1 in my case – thanks @j4mie

    In fact, I’ve just quite literally applied the sensor now as I’ll be heading out later for a short bike ride. Didn’t feel a thing.

    Premier Icon weeninja
    Free Member

    My hubby has one, game changer. He’s learnt so much about peaks and troughs. He’s only managed to knock the sensor off twice (hitting a door frame). He’s on v1 of the system, I gather V2 is much improved.
    I like that I get to sneaky scan as well.

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    I like that I get to sneaky scan as well.

    Haha, brilliant! I suspect that’s why its so useful for parents with T1 children so they can do the same.

    Premier Icon robw1
    Free Member

    welcome to the Libre club!! I’ve been using the Libre sensors for about 3.5 years. Libre 2 now for about 1 year. they really are a game changer. Do you have it connected to your phone so it will scan and alarm to your phone? thats the absolute beauty of the Libre 2 that you can set the low alarms. i suffer a bit from night time hypos so the alarm is great to wake me up as soon as i go low so i don’t stay that way for too long and wake up feeling awful.

    I’ve knocked off a few sensors in the past. Every time i have though Abbott have replaced the sensor. I use Rock Tape which is a physio / kinesiology tape made from strong cotton like material that is stretchy and very adhesive. I cut it into patches a bit bigger than the sensor and it lasts maybe 4-5 days. definitely stops it getting caught on door frames etc. another good tip is to shave off the hair where you apply the sensor and use some rubbing alcohol on the skin before you apply (let it all dry out first though). Keeps the area clean and makes it easy for the senors to stay stuck and less uncomfortable to remove at the end of the 14 days.

    even though the Livre 2 does bluetootch to the phone for alarms im not sure you can get it to send out a constant reading to a garm or smart watch (i could be wrong). I think you still need to scan to get the reading and therefore not a way around that with the libre alone. there is a Bluetooth device call a Miao Miao you can get that does this. I used to use it and it was very good. Yopu could set alarms etc….but it used some 3rd party software which apple kept on kicking off from their app store.

    Premier Icon Dr_Bakes
    Free Member

    I use Libre 2 and agree it’s a game changer. However, when I first started using it and checking the readings with finger prick tests I got some wildly different readings – like 9 mmol/L different on stable sugars. Abbott put it down to bad batches but it seems to be more reliable and I’ve stopped checking more recently.

    I switched off the alerts as I’m pretty good at knowing my rough sugars anyway. I now just carry my phone and check at will. The lag is a bit of a pain but you learn to respond to it.

    Unlike most above, I do have trouble getting them to last the full 14 days. The adhesive always seems to lift and snag so I have started covering them with stickers I bought off amazon. Even they need replacing each week. Perhaps I’m just a sweaty git who can’t judge doorways, but I am pretty active so this may contribute. I’d never choose to go back to finger prick tests now and when I do occasionally test I forget how inconvenient and painful it is. My long scarred finger tips are now almost healed!

    Premier Icon ji
    Free Member

    MY elderly mum has had these (both the original and the libre 2) for several years and loves them. Her GP/consultant can also download all the readings which is useful.

    The only downside is if you forget that the alarm is very loud – especially at a funeral. And if you’re 80 and cant figure out how to silence it….and your bag with your emergency kitkat is at the back of the very large church….

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    Again – thanks to all that have commented!

    Just over two days in and I can honestly say that it is (and I shudder to use the management bingo catchphrase) a ‘gamechanger’! Haven’t had to prick a finger since… Tuesday sometime I think? Being able to see blood sugar level trending so useful too.

    It’d be interesting to work out whether how the cost of one sensor over two weeks compares with the cost of numerous test strips over the same period – irrespective of the long-term benefits in terms of better management.

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    Aaargh, fitted a new sensor and phone says it has a fault and it won’t work – just had to pull the bloody thing off! Has that happened to anyone?

    We were told to seek a replacement from Abbott rather than use a spare (not that I have one anyway so a return to finger pricking until I get a replacement) as the prescriptions are monitored and we will only be issued with 26 a year.

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    Only had one that refused to start. Knew as soon as it went in that it sent right. Phone Abbott from landline if you use phone app as they will ask for the error code from app. Also keep the foil lid from the sensor pack as it has the batch number on it. Don’t dispose of sensor either as they will ask you to return it. They’ll provide bags and return paid envelope when they send out new sensor.
    I’m lucky, I get 4 sensors at a time so usually have a spare in case of a problem. That said, replacements from Abbott only take a day or two to arrive.

    Premier Icon househusband
    Full Member

    @clubby Thanks; had a feeling that they’d want the serial number so I rescued the cardboard packaging from the recycling, assuming it is on that besides the foil… alas the sensor itself is in the depths of the kitchen bin and I’m not exploring that!

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Full Member

    You’ll need to, they need them back for testing…

    As much as you get 26, use the spare you have as the one from Abbott will replace that.

    Also be aware that there is a 10-15 minute delay between a finger prick test and what the sensor is reading – not great for hypos or very highs, so keep finger prick test stuff available (if needed).

    Sensor is about 50 quid and lasts a fortnight. Assuming you test about 6 times a day (maybe 7 if you do a before bed check) then I think you may 3 (or 4) boxes of strips (can’t remember how many strips on a box), I think the boxes are about 15 quid each, so it isn’t a huge difference but sensor works out cheaper over the year (no need for needles to prick finger either).

    Initial setup is pricey but works out cheaper in long run but depending on how often you test the break even and then cheaper part may take longer to reach.

    Premier Icon damitamit
    Free Member

    My partner’s had the libre 1 for a couple years now. Paired with a MiaoMiao bluetooth sensor I got from China its been a ‘gamechanger’ for her too. Using Android and Xdrip+, one of the best things about it is also having her blood sugar displayed on her Garmin. Makes controlling her levels on a 5 hour ride so much easier! Pre-libre she says she was constantly thinking about her numbers/what she’s eaten/what she needs to eat for the entire ride.

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    Sensor is about 50 quid and lasts a fortnight. Assuming you test about 6 times a day (maybe 7 if you do a before bed check) then I think you may 3 (or 4) boxes of strips (can’t remember how many strips on a box), I think the boxes are about 15 quid each, so it isn’t a huge difference but sensor works out cheaper over the year (no need for needles to prick finger either).

    Initial setup is pricey but works out cheaper in long run but depending on how often you test the break even and then cheaper part may take longer to reach.

    No, sensors still dearer for most people.
    NHS pay £35 per sensor, so £70 a month. Most common test scripts are £10 for 50 and lancets (finger prickers) about £6 for 200. However, if you pay attention to sensor trends and adjust doses accordingly, your control improves leading to less complications down the line, saving money in the future. Be 20-30 years away but overall potential savings are massive.

    Premier Icon ahsat
    Full Member

    Any insight into how people in England get them? My Dad is type 2, mid 60s and diet and drug controlled. He’s ok if he just potters round the house; but keeping it all in check when he exercises or does significant DIY is a challenge. He really struggles on the bike/hill walking and starts feeling faint and wobbly (despite my Mums best efforts). Are they only available for insulin controlled diabetics?

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    https://diabetesmyway.nhs.uk/resources/internal/nhs-england-libre-criteria/

    Sounds like he just needs to monitor more closely (or at all) while exercising. Does he use a glucose monitor at the moment? May be a case of skipping his meds if he is going to exercise. Best speak to his diabetic team first though.

Viewing 27 posts - 1 through 27 (of 27 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.