Viewing 34 posts - 1 through 34 (of 34 total)
  • Newbie Runner – A couple of Questions…
  • v7fmp
    Full Member

    Hey all,

    So i recently got convinced/bullied/duped into doing my local Park Run (Worthing) by a mate.

    I turned up, ran and oddly found it ok.

    I was running in some old shoes, not overly fit for purpose so i bought some runners. Rightly or wrongly i went with some cheap Reebok’s. I was told to ‘wear them in’, but they arrived the day before my next run, so didnt have a chance. But thought its only 5k, whats the worst that can happen…. turns out a ruddy great blood blister on one toe and a hole in another. Bloody socks and everything. 3 or 4 weeks later and they are sill healing, but i put plasters on them when i do run, so they are getting no worse.

    I did another run in the shoes and they seemed fine. Last night i did 7k with my buddy and the shoes rubbed me again, but in new places. This time on the side of my foot, just above the ball, only on my right foot.

    So after all that rambling… how do i bed the shoes in so they dont rub? Or are they the wrong shape/design for my feet? I dont usually struggle with shoes rubbing.

    The next question is… why does my left knee hurt so much today? Poor technique? The punishing nature of running? Is it something my body will fix? Or am i doing damage if i continue to run on it?

    Should i persevere or just knock this running lark on the head and stick to riding bikes?!

    mogrim
    Full Member

    Shoes shouldn’t need to bed in and they shouldn’t rub from the start. Two things to check: use thinner socks, and make sure they’re properly laced up.

    The second question has a clear answer: you’re doing too much, too soon. Your cardiac fitness from biking (presumably!) means you can run 7K, but your joints aren’t actually ready for it yet. Do a couch-to-5K programme or similar, maybe start at week 3 but follow the gradual loading.

    wbo
    Free Member

    If your shoes are rubbing so consistently they’re the wrong shoes in the wrong size. Simple as. Don’t buy them online at this point as you don’t know what you want. And if in doubt with sizing, go up

    Your left knww hurting could be several or many things if you’ve just started. Again the blistering won’t help as it will mess around with how you run. You need to decide if it’s hurting from fatigue or the start of injury…. how long ot disappear.

    jambourgie
    Free Member

    How overweight/out of shape are you? If you’re using a bad technique and slamming loads of weight into a weak knee you should probably nip that in the bud. Try and avoid coming down on your heel and try to land mid-foot for want of abetter description and then roll to the toes and push off. Also, slow the **** down and build up. You say you’re new to it and going straight into 5k, sounds daft, have a slow walk/jog around the park and slowly build up your strength.

    Trainers, in my opinion anything that are comfortable, and if your new ones aren’t then you can persevere and use tape/plasters to cover rubbing bits or go out and buy some that are comfortable. It’s a bit of a gamble as you never really know until you start running in them, by which time you can’t take them back. You might eventually find some brands that suit you and vice versa. I’ve had everything over the years. Best were some old Nike Air’s, worst were some Asics. So I generally avoid Asics.

    nickjb
    Free Member

    Sounds like the wrong shoes. I’ve tried a few out and none have rubbed or hurt from day 1. It is worth spending a few quid on the right shoes but you don’t need to go crazy. There’s usually something on offer. I spend around £40-£60.

    Mogrim has it for the pain. Start slow. Much slower than you think. Then a bit slower. Build up to bigger miles and pace, it will take time but it’s all worth it

    stumpy01
    Full Member

    Running hoes shouldn’t really need bedding-in. I haven’t done it for any running shoes I’ve owned for the last 20 years or so. It won’t harm them to have a walk around for a bit in them, but I have found it not necessary.

    Suitability of the shoe will very much decide on the shape of your foot – sounds like the toe box of your shoes is too narrow. FWIW I always found Asics & Reebok were no good for me – too narrow & gave me blisters. I used to work in a sports shop & run at club level so had plenty of access to different shoes over the years.
    That was many years ago, but last time I bought some running shoes I tried some Asics and still found them no good (on a treadmill in the shop).
    I would recommend looking at Brooks for ‘proper’ running shoes. They generally have more room in them around the front of the foot.
    If you don’t want to spend that kind of money, try some mid-range Nike Air. They get a bit of a bad-rap in ‘proper’ running circles as being more fashion driven these days, but in my opinion they get a lot of things right & I’ve never had an issue with them.

    Regarding the soreness – you are doing too much too soon. It take a long time for your muscles/ligaments/joints to acclimatise to running. You probably have the aerobic capacity from cycling to run a decent distance and so doing short runs feel pointless or frustrating, but you are much better off building the distance over a few months than heading straight to 5km+.
    It feels frustrating as in cycling terms 3km is barely out the door. But regular 3km runs or even less will be beneficial & slowly build the distance as your body gets used to it.

    v7fmp
    Full Member

    drats and blast… i knew buying shoes online was a bad idea, i just didnt want to spend loads, so took the cheap option. Clearly a poor option.

    We do have a ‘Run’ shop nearby that get you on a treadmill and check you technique etc. So i will book myself in to do that. Might cost me a few quid for shoes, but rather that than my feed exploding!

    Pain in my left knee seems to last less than a day. It feels way better now than it did when i woke up. I hadnt considered i might be running differently to try and counteract the pain in my feet!

    And yeah, my cycling has allowed me to run these short distances without too much issue, but i didnt consider that i need to condition my body to the strains of pounding the tarmac.

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    Well worth getting your gait checked out, it’s not as painful as it sounds!

    And as above, running fitness is NOT the same as cycling fitness. Takes it easy for a while.

    bjhedley
    Full Member

    Echo most of the above. Shoes shouldn’t give you blisters, especially on shorter runs. Getting down a running shop and being filmed on the treadmill is invaluable. The right shoes make such a difference. o doesn’t have to mean expensive.

    regarding the Knee – probably an ‘overuse’ injury. Running is brutal on the joints and takes time to adjust. I ride more in summer and run more in winter. This time of year, every year I’m battling niggles as I try and up the running distance. Knees especially since we cyclist are often quad dominated, but lack much lateral stability, leading to over tight IT bands and out of alignment knees.

    In short, start slow – 2 or 3 steady <5km runs a week will get you up and (ahem) running much quicker than plunging straight into 5-10 km plus. Stretch, do Yoga, Stretch again (Especially hamstrings and hips) and then leg stability work like squats, lunges etc really help strengthen the muscles around your knees.

    v7fmp
    Full Member

    awesome, thanks for all the advice folks.

    I am hoping to get to my local running shop on friday and get my Gait looked at (oo-er).

    nicko74
    Full Member

    As above, it sounds like the shoes don’t fit you, but going to a good running shop should help you check that.
    Depending how far you’re running, a tip I lived by for a long time was to go a half size up in your running shoes and always wear 2 pairs of sock – the idea being that, in addition to the additional protection the socks would give, any rubbing happens between the socks rather than between layers of skin. Always worked well for me; never had any issues with major blisters.
    Eventually I stopped and started wearing running shoes the right size, but with good quality socks.

    As for the knee, it could be a number of things; but the best advice is to take it steady with your distance and pace (not pushing yourself, and giving it a while for your body to adjust to a speed and a distance); and to always be stretching. Honestly I have to do stretches (hamstring, calves, IT band (which can cause major keen pain)) pretty much every day even though I’m only running once/ twice a week.
    For context, I previously ran marathons then gave up running as I found it so boring. I started running again a year ago, just 5 miles once a week, and it’s taken about 9 months to get back into the rhythm of it and feel like it’s actually within myself again. Yes I’m unfit, but it can still take ages!

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    What many other posters seem to be missing is that your feet need to harden up a little too, even for a 5k. My first 10k race I got blisters, even though I’d done regular shorter runs at that point. Nowadays I can go out for 2h and more without a problem. Well, occasional problems with some shoe/sock/weather combinations. But not often.

    Remember the first time you went on a bike ride after not riding for a while, and your arse was bruised the next day? Little and often is the key.

    submarined
    Free Member

    I had almost exactly the same with my knee when I started running.
    Physio said it was classic Runner’s knee. Basically I have the cardio fitness and some of muscles well developed from other sports, but not the right muscle structure to support knees when running. So as above, start slow, work up.
    He said if it always starts at the same sort of distance then stop just before this.
    Also gave me some lunges and a few other moves.
    Did all that, and no more issues, happily doing 5ks.

    Have just started moving up to 10ks and the other one is bloody doing it now!

    edhornby
    Full Member

    I’m not an expert runner by any means but the feet hardening is definitely true – I had a gap in August because of holidays etc and the blisters came back for me (I get them in my instep) so yeah building up slowly is the key

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    How long since you started running? I found as a total noob it took about 10 weeks to build up to 5k. I then reliably did 4-6k a few times a week.
    A ‘step up’ to 10k meant my hips and knees hurt a lot – it is just brutal. I had to a) run off-road and b) go easy on my body. I ran 10k ‘occasionally’, like once a month.
    I also tried running with a club, and found they constantly wanted to push pace and get me to go further and faster.

    IMO, you need to listed to your body. If 5k or so is ok but more is not, then stop doing what hurts. Work out why and train around it.

    irc
    Full Member

    Try and avoid running on tarman. Grass is ideal. Or gravel. Much easier on the joints.

    Early on don’t run 2 days in a row.

    v7fmp
    Full Member

    more top info, thanks everyone.

    I totally underestimated the learning curve for running. I will start doing more frequent shorter runs to help build things up.

    I am not surprised my feet are destroyed… they are soft, pretty little things 😀

    johndoh
    Free Member

    Running hoes shouldn’t really need bedding-in.

    Do they just need tying down?

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    Although shoes shouldnt need bedding in, your feet may do.

    ie your feet may need to toughen up a little.

    Inov8 are my fav shoes, but they always rub my heel for the first 50 miles or so, but then are really comfy.

    On the whole though cheap shoes are not as well designed, shaped, put together as more expensive.

    Try and avoid running on tarman. Grass is ideal. Or gravel. Much easier on the joints.

    I disagree. Many off road runnerist if injured will only do their recovery running on road as it is a much more stable platform. My hip is **** and I can no longer run off road as the instability really gets my hip

    lunge
    Full Member

    Ah, running shoes, my favourite subject.
    Best advise is to try a few pairs in a shop and buy the pair that’s comfiest. Don’t feel you need to go to a proper running shop though, my local Sports Direct has a few perfectly good running shoes.
    Look a good pair of neutral shoes from a known brand that feel good on foot, you don’t need to complicate it more than that. There is much debate about gait analysis, I’m not a fan and think shops use it to sell you shoes. Others may disagree…
    Shoes to look for that are readily available are:
    Nike Pegasus 39, Pegasus Trail 4 or Vomero (nothing wrong with Nike, the days of runners thinking they’re not proper running shoes are long gone).
    Brooks Ghost or GTS
    ASICS Cumulus
    New Balance 880 or 1080
    Saucony Triumph

    Don’t overly complicate it, buy a pair that feel good in your foot, a good pair of daily trainers should feel snug and comfortable.

    Re. Knee pain, most runners get it at some point so don’t worry, but also don’t push through.

    And, as I am being pedantic, it’s parkrun (all 1 word, no upper case) and not Park Run. Sorry…

    v7fmp
    Full Member

    @lunge – noted and Not-ed.

    Pieface
    Full Member

    Blisters and callouses are just part of running life. Your toes will look ghastly if you keep it up.

    You’re either about to get injured, are currently injured, or getting over an injury.

    jeffl
    Full Member

    So I started running about 5 years ago.

    Had the cardio from the bike but my legs ached like a bar steward when I first started running. My feet also ached from the impact initially.

    I just got a pair of trainers from Decathlon, which seem to suit me fine. When they wore out I replaced them with the same. One thing I did note is that the balls of my feet stung for the first couple of runs. I assume that was just the insole moulding to my feet.

    So I’d agree you either have the wrong shoes, they’re too tight, or too loose.

    cynic-al
    Full Member

    Was looking for shoes recently, they seem to start at £60, or £100 in my local running shop 😮

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    Running is hard on the legs, the knees, the ankles, the hips…

    I haven’t run since (checks Strava…) November 2020(!) and my best 5k was a 25:39. I’m pretty confident I’ve got the aerobic fitness to beat that quite easily but I definitely don’t have the legs to run that fast!

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    Was looking for shoes recently, they seem to start at £60, or £100 in my local running shop

    Yeah but they’re pretty much the only bit of kit you need, maybe some clothing but shoes definitely.

    Compared to cycling it costs pennies!

    bjhedley
    Full Member

    Was looking for shoes recently, they seem to start at £60, or £100 in my local running shop 😮

    True, they can be pricey. but then they take about 500 miles of pounding, protecting your feet and body from running barefoot on hard tarmac. In value terms, compared to a pair of 5:10s and fashion trainers, it seems pretty good value.

    lunge
    Full Member

    Blisters and callouses are just part of running life. Your toes will look ghastly if you keep it up.

    Yes and no.
    Your feet can take a battering but they shouldn’t do after 5k. I run 20 miles most weekends and never have blisters as my shoes fit well. I’ll get the odd black toenail if I’ve run long in the hills, but that’s proper long runs.

    Was looking for shoes recently, they seem to start at £60, or £100 in my local running shop 😮

    If you shop the sales well you can pick up good shoes for £60 or £70 (Nike React Milers are currently at £65, Reebok Floatride Energy can be had for similar with a discount code or 2). But as above, it’s worth spending the money on them to keep your feet in good nick.

    Altra trainers here!

    Have a pair for road and a pair for trail.

    Nice and snug around the ankle and forefoot but the toe box is nice and wide allowing for foot to splay naturally. Road ones are zero drop as well but as all others say get some advice with the gait analysis.

    You will be surprised at how your feet do really weird things when running. Mine was my left foot ‘waving’ between fore foot lift and heel strike. Very odd!

    chrismac
    Full Member

    I would also suggest being quite careful when putting your socks on. Make sure they are smooth with no creases, folds or overlaps. It’s amazing how a little fold or crease in sock can generate blisters

    john_l
    Full Member

    Altras here too. Timp 4s. Super comfy on and off road. Will struggle when it gets proper muddy but great at the moment.

    If you have Wiggle’s premier sub (or whatever it’s called) just order a few pairs and send back the ones that don’t fit/you don’t like.

    nickjb
    Free Member

    The Pegasus 39 are £68 at nike.com at the moment. Worth keeping an eye on hot UK deals for any offers on shoes.

    dissonance
    Full Member

    How much walking do you do and how much at a time?
    As others have said running shoes shouldnt be leather walking boots or climbing shoes. There should be no wearing in so you need to switch them.
    For the knee thats where the walking comes in. Build up to any distance and that includes a 5k.

    lunge
    Full Member

    The Pegasus 39 are £68 at nike.com at the moment.

    OP, buy these. A cracking, all round shoe and a ridiculously good price. Ah, sod it, I’m buying a pair myself…

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