New Road Bike – thoughts.

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  • New Road Bike – thoughts.
  • Shibboleth
    Member

    Ride that stem for a few weeks before you buy another… 100mm isn’t very long, it’s not going to adversely affect the handling of the bike.

    You might just need to adapt to the position a bit…

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Its not that, i can’t reach the controls comfortably – or safely in my opinion. A Deda stem is less than Β£20 so i’m going to plump for one and see how it goes, can always go back to the 100 later.
    I just don’t feel safe at the moment.
    I find my ‘perfect’ hand/arm position is just behind the hoods so if i reduce the stem length then the hoods will fall right under my hands in that ‘perfect’ zone.

    Adjustable stem FTW. Not pretty, and not light, but will help you get the geo dialled – certainly sorted me out. Someone will be along in a moment to say what a bad idea that is… πŸ˜‰

    tonyd
    Member

    Nice, congratulations on the new bike. I’ve got 23mm tyres on mine too and it’s not too harsh commuting 3-4 times a week. As Shib suggests it will take a little time to ‘stretch’ into the most comfortable riding position, especially coming from MTB, so it might be worth sticking with it a llittle longer however do what’s comfortable. I have a 90mm stem on mine and it’s just about right – position and comfort is everything!

    tonyd
    Member

    Adjustable stem WTF?! I’ve used one for adjusting height but not seen them for adjusting length. I suppose height adjust does bring the reach in a bit.

    If I were you I’d just go for the cheap throw away option, or speak with your friendly LBS – they might lend you one. Don’t you have a box of old MTB stems in the garage you can try out?!

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I wish i could link the bloomin’ picture!

    Anyway, the height of the bars is fine at the moment, has some spacers so may be dropping the bars as time progresses, it’s the reach i’m having trouble with. Just ordered a Deda 70mm stem as i’ve measured 30mm back from the hoods to where my hands are in the sweet spot, so will see when it arrives.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Tony – do have old stems but they are all 25.4mm and the Deda bars are 31.7mm!
    Bit late now as i’ve already ordered a shorter one, can always sell on the unwanted versions.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    70 mm stem will make the handling mega twitchy, go for an inline seatpost or move the saddle forward a bit…

    Premier Icon mboy
    Subscriber

    How tall are you?

    100mm stem certainly isn’t that long for a road bike, I’d say if you feel like you need a shorter stem, you probably should have bought the next bike size down.

    As for the inflexibility thing and getting used to riding on the hoods, and in the drops, it will come. You’ll probably actually find in a short space of time (assuming you do have the correct sized bike) that the 100mm stem makes sense quite quickly. In fact most roadies run 110mm+ stems anyway.

    On the subject, I had to chuckle the other day at work when a middle aged chap came in on a Colnago C59 with Super Record, Mavic Ksyrium SLR’s, a Powermeter and all the trimmings, but an 80 mm stem and a whole load of stem spacers! Clearly he was quite inflexible, had bought a bike too big for him to get a longer headtube, was compensating with a very short stem and it all looked a mess! What he actually needed was a more relaxed geometry bike that fitted him in the first place…

    Haha. Took about 2 mins πŸ™‚

    So, with me, I started high and short, and as I became more used to it, went a bit longer and lower. But this only really works if you have enough steerer tube and spacers above the headset to make the adjustments (as per your bike), or you have quill stem (as per my bike). CRC have the Ritchey adjustable stem in 100mm and 80mm I believe. Then once you know what works for you, you can buy appropriately. Saves going through 7 or 8 stems.

    PS – I should add that my frame was a tad too big for me really, but it was free, so I ‘made’ it work. Not generally recommended, but I’m very happy with it and now in second year of daily commute plus weekend road riding.

    tonyd
    Member

    Oh yes forgot to mention, I also swapped out layback post for inline which helped a lot.

    (Edit: Yes, prob should have got the next frame size down in hindsight)

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    An inline post is possibly on the cards, depends on how this new stem goes. I’ll change one thing at once at try it for a while.
    I really didn’t like the 100mm stem though.
    I’m 5’2″ but i have a long torso and short limbs for my height so whilst the top tube feels ‘right’ in that i’m over the front of the steerer tube, my hands are ‘just’ having to reach too far to be comfy or safe.

    The 48cm frame was the size reccommended by a couple of bike shops and CRC’s support people, the next one down was 42cm which would have been way too short in the top tube i think.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Oh yes, i have a pretty short stem on my Mango, which is slightly too big for me at 52cm (i think) it’s a small and supposed to fit 5’2″ – 5’7″ and i don’t find that twitchy when riding on the horns of the bullhorn bars.
    I’ll get used to it, just came as ashock to the system – it’s been over 30yrs since ive ridden a drop-barred bike and that had those old top levers and downtube shifters!

    WAYHAY!!!!!! Nice one fella πŸ˜†

    hitman
    Member

    I wish i could link the bloomin’ picture!]

    how to post an image here:
    http://singletrackworld.com/forum-help/

    Edit: looks like you’ve managed it now!

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    So, my lovely new bike turned up today – Colnago Ace 105 in a 48cm flavour.
    First impressions, it’s pretty, it looks delicate and its light! So i put it together and sat on it. Hmmm, seatpost too long so out with the hacksaw.
    Right, got the bars parallel with the saddle as told on here, fitted the 10mm inserts into the SDI’s and stuck some mtb spd’s on and off i went.
    Quickly realised the stem is too long at 100m so i’ll be shopping shortly.
    Riding on the hoods is odd, because the stem is too long i felt i wasn’t in control enough with the braking – conversely being in the drops was quite comfortable strangely enough. Which is important as that was the only way i felt confident in traffic!
    Gears – 50/34 and an 11-28 cassette seems to be about right, heading up my local climb and never felt like i was running in too tall a gear (which was one of my worries). Still not au fait with SDI systems, kept braking on the front when i changed into a larger cog on the rear but i suppose i’ll get used to that. I suspect it’s because i’m reaching too far due to the stem. I had to ram the saddle all the way forward as well due to the stem, but i think that will change when the stem does.
    The frame seems to fit me fairly well, with the caveat of my extremely short legs of course. Top tube length seems spot on, my chin appears to be just forward of the steerer tube any way.
    The ride is surprisingly smooth for a bike with 23c tyres, never having ridden carbon before its a pleasant feeling.
    It does seem to wind up its speed pretty quickly as well, something i’m going to like!
    Still needs some fine fettling, new stem, maybe an inline seatpost but so far i’m pleased with my purchase πŸ™‚

    fubar
    Member

    I switched to an 80mm stem on my road bike and I don’t find it ‘mega twitchy’ – enjoy!

    crikey
    Member

    I’m wondering how ‘compact’ those compact bars are, and I suspect that the FSA compact bars are even smaller, which would bring the hoods a bit closer still.

    That seat looks to be a ‘tall’ seat; the distance from the rails to the top of the seat is larger than something like an SLR saddle.

    It’s hard to say without seeing you on it, but I suspect a shorter stem and lower bars would be a more suitable position; part of your struggle to reach the STIs is because you are behind them rather than on top of them.

    Oh, and lose the dustcaps!

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Come on then, critique the bike and the background πŸ˜†

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Come on then, critique the bike and the background πŸ˜†

    tonyd
    Member

    part of your struggle to reach the STIs is because you are behind them rather than on top of them.

    Agreed, slam that stem! πŸ™‚

    Nice bike.

    crikey
    Member

    Just chatting with the wife and even she says that the bars on that bike are big.

    Here is her bike, now sold, just look at the bar and stem set up for how compact bars can get:

    …and you need tape on the forks where the STI cables sit or it will rub. The best way to avoid this is to run the right hand cable to the left hand frame stop and cross them under the down tube.

    retro83
    Member

    Nice bike, that tape won’t stay white for long πŸ™‚

    Word of warning – don’t keep the seat pushed right forward long term to make up for an overly long stem, I did that and buggered my elbows up (burning pain running along the forearm bone to the elbow). Think it moves too much weight onto the arms, though I am a bloater 8)

    joeegg
    Member

    Swapped out the handlebars and stem on my Cube road bike to wider bars and 70mm stem instead of 110mm.
    A lot more comfortable and the front end doesn’t feel twitchy but a bit more precise.
    The Cube has odd sizing and a friend with one also swapped his stem to a shorter one.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I’m thinking that with a shorter stem i’ll be able to drop the bar height somewhat. I didn’t find the bars that big TBH but then again i know nowt about road bikes.
    I’m going to get me some helitape before it goes out again as well.
    The saddle should – hopefully – move back somewhat when the new stem is fitted. It will take a little time (and cash) to get it dialled but i’ve got 5 bikes and only one has been a perfect fit from the off.

    TiRed
    Member

    Shorter stem, then rotate the brake levers – but not the bars round so that the tops are level (yours point up about 5 degrees). What is teh bar width? Narrower bars can increase reach (or use a longer stem). Pro’s are riding with 400mm rather than 420-440. I can’t be sure, but I think you’ve moved the saddle far forward to reduce the reach. Set saddle so that you’re in the right position above the BB (knee over pedal spindle is a good start), then choose stem to match reach.

    And obviously, unless you’ve just climbed an HC col, all photos should have the chain on the big ring.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I live on top of a hill, just got home in this pic πŸ˜†

    The bars are 42cm i believe.

    Premier Icon mboy
    Subscriber

    Was going to say 48cm should be spot on at your height, but just looked at the geo chart. I’m 5ft10, would normally ride a 55-56cm frame, 54 at the smallest, but looking at Colnago’s geometry I’d want a 52cm frame in that bike! The 45cm would have shortened the TT length by 12mm, as well as giving you another 3cm of standover clearance.

    Odd how different companies size their bikes eh!

    is the saddle height in the picture your riding height ????????? πŸ˜₯

    if so, then that’s the completely wrong frame size 😯

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    As i said, i have a long torso and short limbs. My inside leg is just 26.5″ yet when i’m on that b.ike my chin is in front of the steerer tube.
    If i went any smaller with the frame it would be way too small.

    All my bikes have the saddle pretty much in line with the bars, whether that be the mountain bikes, the hybrid or the singlespeed roadie bike.

    TiRed
    Member

    Tempted to agree that,looking at the Colnago geometry, you could have gone one size smaller. But fear not. Once you have set the saddle (an inline post is a distraction here – get the saddle in the right position on that steep seat tube), and fixed the reach with a correct stem, you’ll be able to slam that (shorter) stem and remove those spacers. Frames can fit +/- a size, so you’ll be OK.

    Just as long as you have decent standover height.

    Incidently what length are the cranks? You should probably be riding 165mm.

    boblo
    Member

    Suppose it’s in the OP’s User name πŸ™‚

    bars and saddle level like that is normally the reserve of the tourer. Puts me in mind of the old 10 speed racers you used to get for Xmas. Frame was always massively oversized (he’ll grow into it… ) and the saddle almost on the top tube.

    crikey
    Member

    Sizing road bikes when you have got short legs is a real hassle, I know…

    I ended up always buying bikes based on the way the reach worked out and ignored what they looked like. The current fashion, and it is a fashion, for sloping frames and lots of seatpost showing makes no difference in terms of performance, and if you are not so tall, you are better getting a good stretched out low position rather than messing with too small bikes with problems like too much toe overlap.

    Crank size is another red herring; it really doesn’t matter, you get used to whatever crank size you have; I started on 175s, moved to 170s, rode 165s and now use 172.5s, and none of the changes have made any difference.

    Ultimately, it’s not about the bike…

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Crank length is 170mm. Standover height doesn’t bother me TBH, i’m used to not having much with such short legs. I’ve tried female specific frames in the past and found them way too cramped. To be fair, they don’t really design bikes for people like me so i’ve always had to make myself fit as best i can.
    The bars will get dropped as i get used to the bike, that’s how it came.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I may end up with another saddle as this one is a bit ‘stiff’ to say the least! Just been measuring it against my other saddles and it IS on the tall side. Oh well..

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Crikey – the toe overlap thing is a good point actually.
    I have a small Boardman hybrid that is a 45(ish)cm frame and i occasionally clip my toes, never even gave it a thought today and didn’t have a touch. Same crank length and same shoes.

    ajc
    Member

    Your saying you need a shorter stem as the reach is too long, and the seat is really low on the frame. I’m afraid the frame is just too big for you. The bars and saddle should not be level on a road bike, maybe on a long distance tourer. I know a couple of people your height and they ride bikes with 650 wheels so they don’t get issues with toe overlap on such a small frame. I am assuming this was an internet purchase, a descent bike shop shouldn’t have sold you a bike with a setup that looked like that. Hope you manage to get something workable out of it.

    TiRed
    Member

    Here’s another example of small road bikes – my Son who is a mighty 5’1″ rides this XS Giant Avail (which is really a Defy)

    It too has an 80cm stem. Ride is fantastic. Bars are just above saddle which means he can ride the drops easily. It replaced a 650 wheeled road bike. Toe overlap has not been an issue.

    Toasty
    Member

    Your saying you need a shorter stem as the reach is too long, and the seat is really low on the frame. I’m afraid the frame is just too big for you.

    This, especially as you’re running the saddle forward on it’s rails, blatantly looks too big in every dimension. Trying to match bar/saddle height, because that’s what you do on a mountain bike isn’t the most solid logic.

    The model below would have only been 12mm or so shorter in the top tube. You’d have 30mm more standover. Even then it sounds like it would be big.

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