Mud tyre – at the back too?

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  • Mud tyre – at the back too?
  • Premier Icon smogmonster
    Subscriber

    Just wondering….do STWers run mud tyres at the back as well as on the front now its Glooptastic out there? I currently have the choice of keeping my Trail Boss on the back, or sticking a Hillbilly on in its place to match the front Hillbilly. Whats the normal way these days?

    Premier Icon superstu
    Subscriber

    Rear is where I’d go first to be honest. Maybe I’m doing it wrong!

    For old school XC then a pair of skinny mud tyres, or for actual DH then dual spikes or cut spikes is pretty normal. But for most other stuff, no, not with these big cut spike style tyres. Maybe get a more open bigger knobbed intermediate tyre like a DHR2 – the Trail Boss is quite a summery rear tyre.

    Premier Icon ajantom
    Subscriber

    As above, pretty much anything will be better than a Trail Boss on the back in winter.
    I put on WTB Vigilante on the rear last winter and was pleasantly surprised, muchos grip.

    Premier Icon Kamakazie
    Subscriber

    I wouldn’t if you have a fair amount of road riding to get between trails but otherwise I don’t see why not.

    Either way, I’d go for something more open than a trailboss. If you like Spesh tyres then the Eliminator has been good on the back in the wet.

    Premier Icon w00dster
    Subscriber

    I use a Mud tyre front but a decent trail tyre on the back, shorty front and a bontrager xr5 team issue 29×2.6.
    Works well for me on fairly sloppy and claggy muddy trails.

    pedlad
    Member

    Yes. I hate that spinning out feeling on a climb from losing rear traction. Transformed my enjoyment of winter riding when I started fitting proper mud tyres for the dark months.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    I tend to stick with low-ish profile all-round tyres, but have to admit something like a DHR2 or HR2 is better on the rear in winter.

    Just CBA changing them with tyre inserts to take into account.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Totally depends on your riding. A lot of mine tends to be fireroad/path climbs and fun descents so I don’t need the rear traction so much. But when I used to do more traditional XC, if I had a mud on the front it usually meant I’d want one on the back too so I could churn through swamps

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    I ran a beaver winter before last, did really well in the slop, but not great when it dried out as it’s pretty narrow (2.0), Spesh equivalent is the storm I think.

    Giving a wider HRII a go now, staying with shortys on the front though.

    “I hate that spinning out feeling on a climb from losing rear traction.“

    Before the plus tyre thing and the escalation of tyre widths/volumes I was running a Rubber Queen 2.2 on the back (a big tyre for then) and recall it being one of only two bikes that got up a very muddy slippery climb, the other being a fat bike – and there were definitely bikes on XC mud tyres present. So I’m not convinced you need a mud tyre for traction, just the right kind of knobs and spacing (and pressure and width) on a tyre.

    It was more work to drag through the mud than the Mud-X tyres I’d run before but a damn sight better on wet roots and great when the trails dried out.

    Premier Icon northernsoul
    Subscriber

    Yes. I hate that spinning out feeling on a climb from losing rear traction. Transformed my enjoyment of winter riding

    +1 although I’m a tightarse and use a Michelin Country Mud – not a bad tyre, not the best, but great value for money and actually quite good on roads/fire roads etc if you need to link sections. I don’t mind trail tyres on downhill sections, especially when they start getting slidey, but they’re no fun going uphill.

    philjunior
    Member

    I would put something open/full knobbly than a trail boss, but it doesn’t need to be as grippy as the front, descending anyway it has little grip and a bit of drift in the rear is no massive problem. You’ll generally want a harder compound and maybe thicker sidewall in the rear too, to give longer wear and faster rolling whilst protecting adequately against pinch flats.

    philjunior
    Member

    It was more work to drag through the mud than the Mud-X tyres I’d run before but a damn sight better on wet roots and great when the trails dried out.

    I’ve found the same with narrow mud tyres – they’re good on mud, but no good on the slippery roots that are usually found in and around mud.

    Premier Icon snotrag
    Subscriber

    Summer=
    Minion DHR Front, Minion SS Rear

    Not Summer, almost everything else including trail centres, rocky or gravelly stuff =
    Shorty Front, Minion DHR Rear

    Ultra-bog or deepeest darkest local soggy woods riding =
    Shorty Front, Shorty Rear

    Shorty’s are the best all round usable mud tyre ever, IMO, and the only ones that actually work at all on anything else, ie rock, hardpack, roots etc.

    gavstorie
    Member

    all your rear tyre has to do is stop you.. so you want something that is designed for that job. Minion DHR2 is the boss in that category IMHO

    The front tyre is for control and steering. In mud i go for a Michelin wild mud. It is outstanding in wet and muddy conditions without being horrible to live with. I’ve ran one in 28c heat on shale and it was still decent (flat white – caberston – tweed valley)

    Different trail and ground types require different solutions. I tend to ride steep technical rocky, mucky, Scottish slop..

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    gavstorie

    Member

    all your rear tyre has to do is stop you.

    Well, and start you. And if you’re having to pedal through a lot of mud that’s a big deal. I mean, I don’t mind sliming my way up foot fault or similar for a little while in the wet with a dhr2 on the back but when you’re pedalling through mud for hours as some people do, you want a mud tyre just to keep going.

    gavstorie
    Member

    the DHR2 starts and stops fine in mud. It’s my all year, all conditions tyre. The only thing it struggles with is snow.. but then theres no real cure for that.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    gavstorie

    Member

    It’s my all year, all conditions tyre.

    Mine too. Well, Rockrazor for the summer too.

    But it wouldn’t be, if my “all conditions” was routinely slogging for miles through fields and the like, as it does for some people. A DHR2’ll get you through that but it’s far more effort than an XC mud.

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Subscriber

    I use a Beaver for the rear in winter op. Hillbilly front. It’s think clay around here but copes with even that pretty well. As well as anything will anyway.lol

    Premier Icon 16stonepig
    Subscriber

    I’ve been running a Magic Mary/Nobby Nic combo for the year which has been perfect. Until it rained last week, and now the rear is utterly hopeless. It will slide out instantly on anything loose, so I would definitely go for a proper knobbly tyre (not necessarily mud, but definitely loose condition/wide tread) at the back. I’ve got a WTB vigilante to go on, but have just seen that Specliazed have a sale on for their Hillbilly and Purgatory right now:

    https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/shop/sale/c/sale?q=%3Aprice-desc%3Aclearance%3Atrue%3Agroup%3ATyres%20%26%20Tubes#result-list

    gribble
    Member

    16stonepig – tempted by the Specialized mud tyres. Do you know what the difference is between the Hillbilly GRID 2 bliss tyres (on sale) and then the Hillbilly GRID trail tyres?

    The more expensive ‘trail’ tyres look marginally lighter, but both seem to have Gripton compound. just a newer model?

    Premier Icon 16stonepig
    Subscriber

    I think GRID TRAIL might be a slightly newer sidewall tech. It’s really hard to tell though – tyre manufacturers deal in WAY too many buzzwords.

    EDIT: Here you go – https://www.specializedconceptstore.co.uk/news/introducing-the-new-grid-trail-control-tyre-casings/

    gribble
    Member

    thanks 16stonepig. I see your google skills spank mine (which is not hard, I am useless). Looks like simply a question of is it worth another £17 per tyre for a bit of extra sidewall support.

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