MS Office Install

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  • MS Office Install
  • Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    Upgraded the OS on my macbook and Office appears to have been affected – evrything takes for ever to open, especially files from emails. Office is a 2016 version so I thought all would be fine.

    Thinking of getting 365 and just wondered if I have to uninstall the current Office beforehand or will the new stuff overwrite the old automatically?

    if the former, better to uninstall first I guess?

    P-Jay
    Member

    Short answer is uninstall and reinstall.

    Longer answer is that ‘Office 365’ as it’s now called was called Office 2019 for a while, it’s all horribly and probably pointlessly complex but they’re all slightly different even if it’s functionally the same and you can’t ‘upgrade’ versions, even of the same year.

    P-Jay
    Member

    Saying that, whilst I’ve no experience of using a Mac, I wouldn’t expect Office 2019 / 365 to work any better than 2016.

    Premier Icon nixie
    Subscriber

    Strangely o365 reports as v16 sometimes. Definitely uninstall first though. Had loads of pain when I skipped this step!

    footflaps
    Member

    Isn’t O365 a web based version but it lets you download whatever is the latest disc based version (office 2019 now I guess)?

    I’m still using 2010 as it runs faster….

    Premier Icon nixie
    Subscriber

    The installed version of O365 reports itself as O365 on launch and will only work when you have a valid O365 subscription.

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    On Windows, I’ve installed Office 2019 with key from my MS partner account and apps start up saying ‘2019’, but then I logged into them with my Office 365 account and they start up saying ‘Office 365’ now.

    In short, they’re the same wherever you install from, just they adopt the licence based on the account signed in as or fall back to a product key if present. At least on Windows. If you installed from O365 you should still be able to enter a product key somewhere. Usually buried away.

    Office 365… it’s more of a subscription model. Yes it provides web options, plus mobile apps (and you can install these on Windows rather than the full Office apps, and they’re decently featured. OneNote is also sort of deprecated as a desktop app and now a UWP app in Windows, or at least is more up to date), but it’s a licence to use them, the desktop apps, plus you get the cloud services, and 1TB of storage with OneDrive. O365 for Business adds a bit more (Exchange, Sharepoint etc).

    Premier Icon tomnavman
    Subscriber

    They are not the same!

    Office 2019 is the latest available with a non subscription model – it may (but equally may not) receive new features as they are released

    Office 365 will receive new features as they are released, and will automatically be kept up to date with all the new features as long as subscription is kept current.

    You can’t install 365 using a 2019 license or vice-versa.

    Office 365 also gives you other benefits like 1TB onedrive storage which 2019 does not, also check out the family subscription – £79.99/year for up to 5 accounts.

    footflaps
    Member

    O365 for Business adds a bit more (Exchange, Sharepoint etc).

    Whenever I log into my O365 account, it offers more and more crap I’ve never even heard of…

    Mail, Calender and basic Office (Word, PP, Excel) is all I want / use….

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2eHFpPA]O365 Apps[/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

    P-Jay
    Member

    O365 for Business

    Is that ‘Microsoft 365 Business’ or ‘Office 365 Business’ because, amazingly they’re very similar in both name and application, but also COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PRODUCTS somehow.

    I would love to say I fully understand 365, but even after 5 years of using, selling and advising on it, I really don’t – every time you think you’ve got a grasp on it, it changes.

    P-Jay
    Member

    Isn’t O365 a web based version but it lets you download whatever is the latest disc based version (office 2019 now I guess)?

    I’m still using 2010 as it runs faster….

    Yes, and indeed no.

    365 in it’s simplest form means ‘subscription’

    Some of the cheapest version only offer the browser based version, they’re actually not bad, once you get your head around the whole ‘right click thing’.

    The more expensive ones come with installed software.

    The advantages very depending on user, but you always get the latest version, hence they don’t give them year-based names now and if you’re paying the proper price for them they can be cheaper in a business case – for example Office 2013 was the first user based license – to work best it needed to be assigned to it’s user (a lot weren’t) technically that user owned that license, even if they left the company they could (and sometimes did) log into their MS live account, change their details and took the license home with them. Standalone Office Home and Biz is £250, 365 Business is £7.90 it takes about 32 months of subs to catch up to the cost of the stand-alone, but if that person left in the meantime you’d technically need to buy another one.

    Back in the day MS sold volume licenses to businesses, these came with software assurance (always up to date, but manually and not automatically) and were transferable – but they were horribly expensive and you needed an IT dept to manage them. 365 does all that, plus more, for a lot less money and is far easier to manage, it’s supposedly end user / business owner managed, but most can’t or don’t want to.

    footflaps
    Member

    My main office gripe is speed, each new version and OS runs slower than the last…

    I benchmark every combination and Excel 2003 on XP blows away Office 2019 on W10 – just leaves it for dead.

    They add in loads of features 99.9% of people never use, but core functionality gets slower and slower.

    I run the odd training course on Excel / VBA based tools and when you have a mixture of users on different version we all have to wait for those on the latest version to catch up as number crunching activities can be 10x slower, which can equate to minutes of delay…

    I’m on the oldest supported version W7 / Office 2010 as it’s the fastest combo under support.

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    They are not the same!
    Office 2019 is the latest available with a non subscription model – it may (but equally may not) receive new features as they are released

    Office 365 will receive new features as they are released, and will automatically be kept up to date with all the new features as long as subscription is kept current.

    They are different purchase models, but they are effectively the same installation. The features enabled / updates vary based on the licence however. 365 will get you live file sync, sharing and collaboration (with business versions), etc. You don’t have to change the install though, only the licence.

    Noting there are differences in the bundling in that a volume pack install may be pre-configured to avoid using the product key on every install, though usually they’re tied to 365 domain accounts these days.

    You can’t install 365 using a 2019 license or vice-versa.

    Yes you can. I have done it on several machines. First installed the 2019 version and then converted with 365 licence simply by signing in.

    Or you can revert from a 365 licence to a 2019 key by entering product key. It’s buried away in the sign in page. See at the bottom ‘Enter product key instead’

    Office 365 Sign In

    Try it. The splash screen changes from 2019 to ‘Office 365’ and vice versa.

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