Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Microsoft OneDrive WTF
  • wooobob
    Member

    I’ve just noticed that everything on my laptop which I thought was in the C:/user/***/documents is actually in a onedrive/documents folder. Accessing through the C drive shows an empty documents folder. I’m assuming that when activating one drive (which I only really want to use for the odd specific file, particularly transferring between devices) I’ve somehow configured it to hoover up EVERYTHING.

    Bottling up my rage and confusion for a moment, I’d like to try to understand it better. Does anyone know:

    Is this stuff still on my laptop, or in the cloud?
    Does it matter? Why (e.g. can I access it if the internet is down?)
    Will I end up running out of onedrive space and having to pay for more (despite having loads of local space on the laptop)?
    Why is this stuff complicated? Or am I just stupid?

    All I’m dealing with really is Ableton and associated samples/files/plug-ins. So not masses of data. Any help withe the questions, or a pointer to a straightforward resource for understanding and configuring it will be much appreciated.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Is this stuff still on my laptop, or in the cloud?

    Anything in OneDrive will show icons next to the filename to indicate its status. If you go into the OneDrive app you can configure what folders you want to keep locally / sync to the cloud.

    (e.g. can I access it if the internet is down?)

    Switch off your Wi-Fi / disconnect the network cable and find out for sure.

    Will I end up running out of onedrive space

    If you’ve got an Office subscription then you get like 1TB of space IIRC. I can’t remember offhand what the free version gives you, 50GB maybe?

    andrewreay
    Member

    It’s defaulted to back it up into the cloud I expect. So you won’t have access if the net is down.

    There is limited storage, but you get a few terrabytes if you are an MS Office subscriber.

    On the positive side…

    You can download the app on a phone / pad and access from there, so if you broadband is down you might at least be able to view / send the files from a mobile connection.

    It takes some getting used to, and I can share your frustration / exasperation that the new ‘online’ default wasn’t made clear.

    But it’s not a bad solution in the round, so maybe worth persevering:

    OneDrive tips and tricks – ZDNet

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Or am I just stupid?

    No, it’s not you, it’s OneDrive.

    Nobody really understands it at my place of work, and we are a tech company.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    It will be on your laptop as well. That’s how the sync feature works. With recent versions you tell it you want it to consume no more than say 5Gb or whatever and it’ll download your most used files and the rest will stay on the cloud until you need them, then they get downloaded and something else kicked off.

    Just use your one drive folder like your traditional documents folder.

    Premier Icon jimmy
    Subscriber

    . I can’t remember offhand what the free version gives you, 50GB maybe?

    I has 50gb for the minimum £2/m subscription. Was about to run out of space and wondering what to do when they upgraded me to 1TB for free, out the blue. Win.

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    I’m guessing when you’ve set up onedrive you’ve told it to sync your documents folder.

    The key is the icons:

    Blue cloud means it’s stored only in the cloud, so not available offline.
    Hollow green tick means it’s in local storage, either due to it already being on the drive, or you’ve clicked to open it from the cloud which then downloads it to your device.
    Solid green tick means it’s set to always be kept on the device, either set manually or becuase it was already on the drive.

    Free OneDrive gives you 5GB.

    If you want to choose which folders are set to sync to onedrive, click on the cloud icon in the system tray, go to ‘more’ then ‘settings’ and then ‘choose folders’ and you’ll see which folders are ticked, and how much space these will use in total (at the bottom).

    I’ve (for my sins) had to deal with onedrive/sharepoint for business a lot with small companies, it’s not that complicated, until you get companies of 20 people trying to use it as a file share alternative…. :/

    Premier Icon richmars
    Subscriber

    You need to understand what the little icons mean next to each file. You can select any file or folder to always be on your local drive and the cloud, or just the cloud which will be downloaded.

    It depends how you work with multiple devices how you set it up.

    Edit, as above

    smashit
    Member

    until you get companies of 20 people trying to use it as a file share alternative…. :/

    How come? This has been proposed at my workplace.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Blue cloud means it’s stored only in the cloud, so not available offline.

    Until you access it, no?

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    How come? This has been proposed at my workplace.

    Depends how it’s set up, if you use the sharepoint side of things it’s not too bad, but the permissions… oh god the permissions. *rocks in chair* And then you have people who want to be able to have all of the shared documents synced on their 60GB SSD laptop, try explaining that the documents aren’t stored on their machine because there’s 5TB of them, and then trying to explain the web interface…

    I’ve dealt with companies using just the onedrive for busines part and having documents shared via that with the whole company, which gets messy.

    I just prefer file servers with mapped drives. 😀

    Bottom line, if you’ve not got much data (few hundred GB) and you’re not coming from a traditional file server and having users expect for it to act the same, you might be OK. Just remember that sharepoint isn’t really a replacement for a file server.

    Until you access it, no?

    At which point the blue cloud will turn into a hollow green tick 😉

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    OneDrive blooming marvellous from a domestic point of view.

    It can be set so that it only creates local files when you access them. The rest of the time it all sits in the Microsoft cloud storage.

    Lovely job if you’ve got a little netbook with a tiny SSD.

    We’ve also got local copies of 100+GB of photos on our main home computer that are backed up to OneDrive and without cluttering up the lightweight machine but I can still get to the odd picture when needed.

    wooobob
    Member

    Thanks all, that’s helpful.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    To echo ta11pau1 even with 2 of us sharing maybe 100MB of files on Macs it struggles. Permissions are a nightmare and I’m still not on top of them yet. Then theres the inability for business OneDrive to be shared with personal OneDrive. On machines with my personal OneDrive running I have two instances of the icon in the menubar.

    I use OneDrive for business stuff

    2 laptops, one at home, one at work. It works for us but we are just logged in as one user. It’s pretty good in terms of syncing the files and not getting too confused, but I’m quite careful with making sure files are saved and not left open.

    I quite like the way it’s baked into Office,

    The best bit is knowing everything is backed up in the cloud. I could lose/smash my laptop, and be up and running on a new laptop in a few minutes.

    I don’t like the permissions though, as said above. You can share a file with someone by emailing them a link, but it is not at all secure. It seems that anyone with that link, not just a specific user, can access the file.

    Premier Icon bigdean
    Subscriber

    I like one drive.
    I’ve three microsoft accounts, 1 for personal, 1 for work and 1 for some part time work all using different email addresses.
    This means i can seperate the files according to the work.

    I sync a bit differently though i have seperate folders set up on the computer and use goodsync to sync the files with the one drive folders/ accounts. So at work documents are save to the one drive folder on the computer, thats automatically synced to the cloud storage and i sync it at home if/ when needed.

    One drive has made work alot easier when i can be on different computers over a number of sites during the day.

    Premier Icon leffeboy
    Subscriber

    It’s worth paying the sub to get 1TB and learning it what the icons mean. Do as Cougar suggested and turn off WiFi to see what is there and what isn’t.  The most important icon to be aware of is the one that tells you when you have sync problems as you have to fix them before it goes pear shaped

    Otherwise it’s brilliant.  No more worrying about if you have lost something when your machine dies or is stolen.  If you use Word then suddenly you have version history and can recover edits you thought you had lost

    And ransomware protection.  If a nasty corrupts your machine you can still get you files back

    I do from time to time still make a backup to an external drive but really very rarely

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