Michael McIntyre

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  • Michael McIntyre
  • Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    yeh, that WAS poor last night

    if that's his typical material, ubiquity is probably a necessity – he'd better make as much cash as he can, quick

    CaptJon
    Member

    This year's Peter Kay. Give me alternative/surreal comedy any day.

    retro83
    Member

    I watched that and thought it was ok. Jimmy carr later on 4 was pretty crap tho. Same old shock jokes.
    The only good bits were the banter with the crowd.

    djglover
    Member

    I nearly died laughing

    Jamie
    Member

    I hate Michael McIntyre. Smug **** who really is not half as funny as he thinks he is.

    Not bringing nothing to the debate i know but i really have an, irrational i am happy to admit, loathing of the man.

    It's funny (this sentence not Michael McIntyre), i was listening to an old Adam & Joe podcast where they were discussing how it was strange that this time last year no-one had heard of Michael McIntyre, and then for whatever reason the BBC decided he was the next big thing and he was everywhere. So less talent and more marketing.

    eth3er
    Member

    Ubiquity breeds indifference.
    Another standup gig on the BBC from the Apollo?!

    Can't get away from the feeling that there is a passing resemblance to Eddie Izzard's material of old.

    More toned down maybe and with the surreal element missing…but still.

    Am I imagining this?

    duntmatter
    Member

    dalendless dwad.

    radoggair
    Member

    Well i think he's funny, and have tickets for his Glasgow gig

    Everyone to their own i guess

    allthepies
    Member

    Can't stand the bloke.

    he's absolutely rubbish.

    Premier Icon nuke
    Subscriber

    Thought it was alright. Agree with WWJR that there was a certain Eddie Izzard feel about his routine. Seen far worse and he doesn't resort to the cheap shock-the-audience laughs of people like Jimmy Carr and Frankie Boyle which, whilst initial maybe funny in a routine, start to get boring pretty quickly IMO.

    Beveled Edge
    Member

    Liked his older stuff more, its getting a bit recycled, but I like him 😛

    Jamie
    Member

    radoggair:

    ….have tickets for his Glasgow gig

    My condolences 😉

    Oggles
    Member

    OK to watch, but I don't understand the hype. And I wouldn't pay to go and see him.

    Well i think he's funny, and have tickets for his Glasgow gig

    Everyone to their own i guess
    I like him too and just got two tickets for his Sheffield gig for my birthday.

    🙂

    davey99
    Member

    Makes Patrick Kielty look talented, if such a thing is possible.

    D.

    englishbob
    Member

    I can't help feeling that he must inherited DNA from Ronnie Corbett. Or is it just me?

    jonb
    Member

    I liked it, but he does seem to be everywhere recently.

    pitcherpro
    Member

    Can't stand the man 😈

    aphex_2k
    Member

    I saw him a few years ago at the Comedy Cafe in Shoreditch.

    He's still using the same material.

    coogan
    Member

    Makes Patrick Kielty look talented, if such a thing is possible.

    Now he is an unfunny cockend.

    CaptJon
    Member

    Shappi Khorsandi is the up and coming beau of the BBC and seems to be constantly on BBC radio. I don't find her stuff funny either.

    uponthedowns
    Member

    One more for the I like MacIntyre camp here. I have no problem with a bit of swearing but its good to see a comedian that can make people laugh without gratuitous use of the f-word. Bill Bailey is another.

    CountZero
    Member

    Michael McIntyre. Who he? Wouldn't know him if I ran over him in the street. Can't be very good.

    Premier Icon BigEaredBiker
    Subscriber

    [quoteWell i think he's funny, and have tickets for his Glasgow gig

    Everyone to their own i guess[/quote]

    Now that amuses me, I saw him at one of the London comedy clubs in 2006 and he threw in a few jokes about scotsmen which upset a Scottish chap in the audience. McIntyre then proceeded to mock this poor bloke & Scotland until the guy completely lost it with him and had to be dragged away by the bouncers 😯

    Smee
    Member

    I too think that he is funny. Not the best out there, but I'd go watch him.

    nicko74
    Member

    Shappi Korsandi – just don't see the point. She just bangs on about being Iranian all the time; desperately unfunny.

    Premier Icon BigEaredBiker
    Subscriber

    Nicko – a bit like the bloke from the Mummy then. I saw him at a local comedy club as a surprise guest, he was crap, he forgot half his material and fell back on his old Iranian gags used on TV god knows how many times.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Can't get away from the feeling that there is a passing resemblance to Eddie Izzard's material of old.

    Not sure I altogether agree, though I sort of see where you're coming from. I think it's more in the style: the ongoing narrative, rather than one liners.

    It's a style that has become popular (think Ross Noble, Russel Howard and McIntyre).

    We ought not to forget that all commedians have a pinnacle in their career, when their ubiquity turns on them and makes them forever after sound hackneyed and unoriginal. It's fine, laugh at his jokes now, and then forget them as someone new comes along.

    Munqe-chick
    Member

    liked him when he first hit the scene, seen him live and his energy is infectious, he is smug but charming with it. Comics spend years writing a sets-worth of material so anyone on regular tv is either going to re-use old stuff, or drop in quality due to the amount of material they have to use (which they may have binned if they didnt have to produce volume).

    Jimmy Carr is a prolific joke writer (new material every year) and I really like him and his one liner style, like the old US comic Steven Wright but with deliberate challenging of taboos. Seen Macintyre, Frankie Boyle, Carr, Dara O'B and Simon Amstell recently. Boyle's was the shortest and laziest set and relied on a second rate billy connolly wannabe (and I dont find BC funny) as warm-up to fill the evening. Macintyre is an old fashioned showman and had the whole crowd (in stuck-up Oxford) going along with him. Really basic, not incisive, observations (ala peter kay) but well told. Dara O'B was a long set, based largely on audience interaction (met the inventor of the Solero in Oxford). Amstell was a real surprise, quite an intimate confessional routine but really engaging and intelligent (and funny). Had a quality warm-up too, who's name escapes me.

    Saw Harry Hill years ago (early to mid nineties?) at uni, still the cleverest and one of the funniest comics Ive seen. He kept several totally unrelated surreal narrative threads going throughout the set, so that after an hour in he would come out with a phrase or sentence mid-flow and it took the audience a second to pick it up and fit it into the correct story so we were always half joke behind. Bloody funny too.

    the phrase "Its shiney it excites" still cracks me up.

    Seeing the original Johnny Vegas routine when he was an unheard-of warm-up act (a ranting drunken monologue in-character about a failed career and shattered/deluded dreams) was also a highlight of comedy club membership as a stude, half the audience didnt get it, the other half were in tears.

    Off to see Ed Byrne and russell howard this autumn, mock the week has a lot to answer for!

    LoulaBella
    Member

    I like Stewart Lee, especially the stuff about Celebrity Hardback books, excellent.

    Premier Icon xherbivorex
    Subscriber

    there was an interesting little article on the guardian last week about an interview vic reeves did on radio recently, as he's doing/done a new series of shooting stars. he reckons that there are no "new" funny comedians in the UK at the moment; they're all just recycling older comedians' material. he specifically mentioned michael mcintyre as being one of the main offenders.
    anyway, saw jason manford at the lowry earlier in the year and he was great, but he has used his entire standup set at different points subsequently on 8 out of 10 cats and mock the week…

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    I saw the Johnny Vegas ranting monologue too. The b'stard ended up pulling me out of the crowd and dragging me to the theatre bar armed with my company credit card that he had stolen along with my wallet.

    We got to the bar, and it was just me, him and a cleaner who wouldn't let him buy a round of drinks (at my expense) for 300+ people in the auditorium.

    He went back to the stage and the bewildered audience were all getting up to leave (we had been gone for quite a few minutes). He tells everyone to sit the f#ck down, then strips off to a pair of very nasty undies and starts singing that Elton John song from The Lion King.

    Ace.

    He said that he would buy me a drink in the down stairs bar afterwards. He didn't.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    I like Michael McIntyre. Not particularly cutting, but a nice conversational style and good observations.

    Premier Icon eldridge
    Subscriber

    Ubiquity breeds indifference.
    Another standup gig on the BBC from the Apollo?!

    You don't know what ubiquitous means.

    If its another standup gig on the BBC from the Apollo
    it means that's the only place you've seen him

    So he's not ubiquitous – he appears in a very limited range of media outlets

    Jamie Oliver is ubiquitous
    Gordon Ramsay is ubiquitous
    James May is ubiquitous
    Richard Hammond is ubiquitous
    The Royal Artillery is (are?) ubiquitous

    RichieBoy
    Member

    I thought Mcintyre was allright.. Jimmy carr later on though was totally dire. He isn't funny and totally offensive. I can't stand those comedians who pick on people in the crowd. I find it really uncomfortable.
    Friend of mine went to see him live. I'd rather see him dead.

    eth3er
    Member

    English is not my first language for that I apologise, I still mishandle the nuances. Next time though I'll consult one of the many easily available on-line dictionaries before humiliating myself.
    It's not like I meant that he was all over the BBC, appearing on panel shows, stand-up shows (live from Apollo, comedy road show and the mentioning of Apollo was maybe a reference to his Friday show (sarcasm and snark! see I'm catching up). To me ubiquitous for a man of obviously confined abilities; bloody semantics!
    I apologise for the poor grammar; that'll take a lot longer to fix.

    Munqe-chick
    Member

    vic reeves criticises modern comics for not being funny, and recycling old material?. This coming from an eric morecombe impersonator who's spent his entire career mistaking "surreal" for "funny", and just relaunched a 13yr old TV show? Must be draughty in that glass house of his.

    CaptJon
    Member

    Rob Newman, now there is a funny man: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQhhrzHKMhI

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