“May I have….” / “Can I get….”

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Viewing 26 posts - 81 through 106 (of 106 total)
  • “May I have….” / “Can I get….”
  • Me and/ and I/ and yourselves……
    I always understood it that if you took the other party out of the sentence, would it sound correct?
    “Me (and dad) went to the shops”
    “The shop assistant sold (dad and) I some bubblegum”
    I’m not too sure about which order you should put each person in though.
    And I remember once being told by a Theatre Studies lecturer that it was PEROGATIVE, not PREROGATIVE.

    Premier Icon dangeourbrain
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    “he was talking to me and my mates”

    Oh you mean “me and” is ok when it should be “us” and you’re just too lazy to form a proper sentence… Eg I was with my friends and he was taking to us.

    “Me (and dad) went to the shops”

    “We went… or, for clarity if who “we” are has yet to be established “i went to the shops with my dad”

    Its all nonsense of course, it doesn’t actually matter, not least because spoken language really isn’t the same as written, it’s just i/me find it annoying.

    BillMC
    Member

    Language and power are related, hence terms like ‘gift of the gab’, ‘silver-tongued’ etc. It’s all very well for the likes of Stephen Fry (Uppingham School, Cambridge University) to say it doesn’t matter but he wouldn’t have got to where he is had he spoken English from the urbs. The ability to communicate clearly and effectively is an important part of fighting your corner and kids are disempowered if they are taught it’s all relative and it doesn’t matter.

    johnx2
    Member

    “he was talking to me and my mates”

    Oh you mean “me and” is ok when it should be “us” and you’re just too lazy to form a proper sentence… Eg I was with my friends and he was taking to us.

    “Me (and dad) went to the shops”

    “We went… or, for clarity if who “we” are has yet to be established “i went to the shops with my dad”

    Its all nonsense of course, it doesn’t actually matter, not least because spoken language really isn’t the same as written, it’s just i/me find it annoying.

    I try to be relaxed about these things, but the me/I thing does grate. You’d not get a frencho mixing up moi and je. When i hear a colleague say “me and a few from IT went to the meeting” it just sounds so wrong. You wouldn’t say “me went to the meeting’ would you?

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    “That’ll learn them” was a common phrase.

    It was common in Lancashire when I was growing up too, no idea why.

    I now get annoyed by people using ‘of’ instead of ‘have’.

    Me too, though less so than by the creeping Facebook abomination that is “ov.”

    And people who use ‘less’ instead of ‘fewer’. Which is somewhat grating at supermarkets.

    I was in Sainsbury’s last year and they had a “ten items or fewer” sign at one of the checkout aisles. It amused me greatly to notice that the word “fewer” was a patch stuck over the original sign.

    whitestone
    Member

    I was in Sainsbury’s last year and they had a “ten items or fewer” sign at one of the checkout aisles. It amused me greatly to notice that the word “fewer” was a patch stuck over the original sign.

    Cheapskate! Booths got it right first time 😜

    I agree “Would of” rather than the correct “would have” is annoying, it’s another of those you only notice when it’s incorrectly written but not when spoken.

    johnx2
    Member

    Booths’ use of ’10 items or fewer’ is simply wrong*.

    But the less/fewer thing really is bollocks though (not that I mix them myself), right up there with caring about split infinitives (which I don’t split), the correct use of “begs the question” (no one gets his one right), or that on the internet a troll is not a giver of abuse, it’s a lurer of idiots.

    *

    you may suppose that some supermarkets are grammatically on the ball by displaying notices at checkouts that state ’10 items or fewer’ (fewer rather than less being the right choice because it’s referring to items, that is, a number of things?). In fact, there were reports a few years back that Tesco had replaced their signs reading ’10 items or less’ with ones which said ‘Up to 10 items’, so as to placate the sticklers. Sorry, no need! This is an example of hypercorrection. Pocket Fowler’s Modern English Usage puts it very succinctly:

    ‘Supermarket checkouts are correct when the signs they display read 5 items or less (which refers to a total amount), and are misguidedly pedantic when they read 5 items or fewer (which emphasizes individuality, surely not the intention).’

    Secondly, in sentences and phrases with ‘than’, you should use less with numbers when they are on their own:

    √ His weight fell from 18 stone to less than 12.
    √ A person with a score of less than 100 will have difficulty obtaining credit.

    and when talking about distance, time, ages, and sums of money:

    √ Companies less than five years old are the ones bringing us new job creation.
    √ Per capita income is reckoned to be less than 50 dollars per year.
    √ Heath Square is less than four miles away from Dublin city centre.

    But hold on, I hear you say – the measurements (years, miles, dollars, etc.) are in the plural, so why isn’t fewer the correct choice? Not so! We use less in such cases because we’re actually still referring to total amounts (of time, money, distance, etc.) rather than individual units.(from https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/08/10/less-or-fewer/)

    Miriam Webster

    An entire day has passed and not one of you smartarse pedantic bores has seen fit to point out that Miriam Webster is an American English dictionary.

    Colourway was one that annoyed but seemingly it’s been in use since 1941 so it’s probably as old as most of you are.

    I will admit that “I could care less” annoys me as it makes no logical sense. But really, there are bigger things to get upset about in life.

    johnx2
    Member

    not one of you smartarse pedantic bores

    be fair, we’re not all that smart.

    core
    Member

    I went on a date with before Christmas, a first date. Had food (informal) then as it was going well went on to watch a film (not that sort). We approach the tills, she says to the lad serving “Can we get some popcorn please?”

    I looked at him, then her, somewhat taken aback, she looked at me, and kept looking, saying nothing, an expression of “What?”.

    “I’m sure we can have some, but you perhaps ought to say what flavour and size you’d like” was what I came out with. **** me, it was all on the board in front plain English, ad there was 2m³ of the stuff in a glass case, what an utterly unnecessary exchange.

    I didn’t see her again. LOL.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    the correct use of “begs the question” (no one gets his one right),

    I’m well aware of the correct usage. But in my 40-odd years on this Earth I’ve never heard it used correctly outside of web pages explaining the correct meaning. I think it’s fair to say that the meaning has changed in language for all practical purposes now.

    An entire day has passed and not one of you smartarse pedantic bores has seen fit to point out that Miriam Webster is an American English dictionary.

    I almost did, but I figured that no British language pedant would ever consider MW as a source anyway. Aside from it “being American,” it’s problematic for British English because Noah Webster was a proponent of English Language Reform and actively sought to popularise what we now consider to be Americanisms (like ‘color’ over ‘colour’ and suchlike).

    I didn’t see her again. LOL.

    She must be very relieved.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I didn’t see her again. LOL.

    Sounds that was a lucky escape, for her. (-:

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    core
    Member

    Cougar

    Subscriber
    I didn’t see her again. LOL.

    Sounds that was a lucky escape, for her. (-:

    Yeah, I’ve modified my approach since…….

    Aside from it “being American,” it’s problematic for British English because Noah Webster was a proponent of English Language Reform and actively sought to popularise what we now consider to be Americanisms (like ‘color’ over ‘colour’ and suchlike).

    Whoa! We’ll have none of that reformation nonsense here, leave that to the colonies and those foreign types!

    Ohmygawwwwd
    Ohmygooourd
    Oh. Maey. Gourd.
    Like, you’re all, like, SO cringe. I can’t even.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    Oh you mean “me and” is ok when it should be “us” and you’re just too lazy to form a proper sentence… Eg I was with my friends and he was taking to us.

    🙄

    “Hey, do you want to come with us?”
    “Who’s “us””?
    “Sorry, do you want to come with Dave and me?”

    “Hey, we’re going out”
    “Who’s ‘we'”?
    “Sorry, Dave and I are going out”

    Do those examples fit with when you may not want to use us/we, which isn’t any more, or less correct, just different!? Me/I are not wholly interchangeable, there remains a right and a wrong one. Yes, language evolves, and saying “me am knowing what you is talking about” is wholly understandable, but it’s still wrong.

    I must confess, I did have an internal “WTF!!” moment a couple of weeks ago when an internal training video introduced the word “burglarized”. I mean, really? Really?? What was wrong with using the more accepted “burgled” eh? ****** Americans! 🙂

    Premier Icon DezB
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    I remember Sean Lock shouting at someone on 8 Out Of 10 Cats Does Countdown… “Can I get a vowel, Rachel”. “NO! You can HAVE a vowel!”. He just does a cringe these days though.

    Premier Icon dmorts
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    I got it from Lidl’s/Aldi’s/Asda’s/Tesco’s etc.

    I assume by adding the s they mean to indicate possession, i.e.

    I got it from Lidl’s [shop]

    I find the phase quite odd, as I’d say

    I got it from Lidl/Aldi/Asda/Tesco

    My only exception would be Sainsbury’s….. but then it is called Sainsbury’s and not Sainsbury.

    Mister P
    Member

    My only exception would be Sainsbury’s….. but then it is called Sainsbury’s and not Sainsbury.

    You could have got bought it in Morrisons.

    Premier Icon dmorts
    Subscriber

    You could have got bought it in Morrisons.

    Got would be correct as I’m using got with from. But noted, in the future I will use words that describe the situation without ambiguity.

    I stole the Vodka from Lidl/Aldi/Asda/Tesco/Sainbury’s/Morrisons

    Premier Icon Drac
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    My only exception would be Sainsbury’s

    Argo, B&M Bargain don’t sound right.

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