Mars and Cancer

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  • Mars and Cancer
  • If they asked you to go – would you go?

    I’m not sure that I would.

    Premier Icon BoomBip
    Subscriber

    crapjumper – Member
    could i take my bike ??

    😆

    So, what tyres for Mars then?

    When I was 20, I was full of ambition; I would have gone. My priorities have changed.

    butcher
    Member

    So, what tyres for Mars then?

    Fatbike. Surely?

    bullheart
    Member

    Maybe you should all have a bash at some chemotherapy? Y’know, just to get used to the treatment? A taster, like? After all, how bad can it be? And it’s probably worth it, for the glory of humankind and all that…

    scuzz
    Member

    Well that escalated quickly

    bullheart
    Member

    I aim to please!

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    Not sure if it’s an urban myth but I’ve heard it said more than once that the total computing power of the Apollo 11 mission was comparable to a ZX spectrum.

    [nerd]
    It’s true that the guidance computer didn’t have a lot of RAM and memory, but then it had only one function: take readings of stars (in putted by the astronauts) and work out where they were, so it didn’t really need much in the way of processor power or speed. it did however have a 00404 error mode….
    [/nerd]

    you always need proper cool people like Neil Armstrong in a tight situation. As for a trip to Mars, the radiation dose is a worry, but there are a great many more risks of instant death.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    any mission to Mars (currently) would be a one-way affair anyway?

    The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one, they say.

    Hats off to you, sir!

    Premier Icon richmars
    Subscriber

    Not sure if it’s an urban myth but I’ve heard it said more than once that the total computing power of the Apollo 11 mission was comparable to a ZX spectrum.

    [nerd]
    It’s true that the guidance computer didn’t have a lot of RAM and memory, but then it had only one function: take readings of stars (in putted by the astronauts) and work out where they were, so it didn’t really need much in the way of processor power or speed. it did however have a 00404 error mode….
    [/nerd]

    The computer was cutting edge at the time, but as nickc says, didn’t need to do much. it was, however, pretty reliable and fault tolerant. It knew when it was getting overloaded (like during the first moon landing) and alerted the crew. It was able to be reset and pick up where it left off. (And the moon landing wasn’t manually flown by Armstrong, just not fully automatic.)
    (The cause of the overload is pretty interesting if you’re really nerdy.)

    I used to live there, don’t know why anybody would want to go there, it’s a bit like Scunthorpe.

    CountZero
    Member

    One thing about this story that I don’t quite understand; where is any mention about shielding? Surely any vehicle that’s going to be in interplanetary space is going to be heavily shielded, after all, there are people spending five months at a time in the ISS, Cdr Chris Hadfield’s just returned after that period in orbit, and they’re exposed to just as much radiation. This sounds a bit of a non-story, really.
    But then, I’m not a journalist looking to get exposure (geddit?) writing a provocative story…

    ISS is in LEO. Deep space is a much more hostile radiation environment.

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    I still find it odd that there wasn’t a high rate of cancer amongst the moon landers.
    When I go for an X-ray there is a sign that says I will lose a minute of my life due to radiation. It then goes on to say a transatlantic flight will send you on your way 5 minutes earlier.

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)

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