Viewing 40 posts - 81 through 120 (of 126 total)
  • Marketing – does it work on you?
  • Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    the main influences of marketing on me are availability of a product that meets my criteria and the location of the shop.[<span style=”background-color: #eeeeee; color: #444444; font-size: 12px;”>/quote]</span>

    Ok, so you accept that parts of marketing do affect you.  That was my point all along.

    What you complain about is advertising and materialistic aspiration, and I agree with you on those.

    Here’s another question then – if I were to buy an expensive bike – would that be me being fooled by marketing and advertising? Would that be me being materialistic? Or would it be me just wanting good kit?  I do ride quite a bit, after all.

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    Here’s another question then – if I were to buy an expensive bike – would that be me being fooled by marketing and advertising? Would that be me being materialistic? Or would it be me just wanting good kit? I do ride quite a bit, after all.

    Surely only you know the answer to those questions…
    You could be rolling in money and simply just need something to spend it on…. (for example).

    What I find more intriguing following this thread is what if you buy a product simply because of poor marketing?

    If you take TJ’s furniture for example… he’s buying a used but presumably not something of such perceived quality it retains its value but also presumably something that was marketed above being cheap tat that is expected to fall apart.

    I find it hard to believe that marketing is aiming for a product that misses the mark and costs more to make but doesn’t retain appreciable resale value.

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Free Member

    I’d rather know about the products available to me, than not.

    BITD the only way we got to know what products were available to is was some very dodgy newspaper or comic ad, or some random crap on TV..

    Then it all got targeted and I’m more than happy with that.

    What fails to impress in this targeted world, is the still random crap that often obliterates a device screen or there are some very suspect reviews.. but at least I can do some of my own research and make informed decisions about what/when I buy stuff.

    I am against the TV advertising regime of the same corporate crap shuved in your face whilst watching a programme.. I find “just eat” and “crap wooden furniture” adverts almost offensive. Save me from the “over 50’s life insurance” and “cruise down a river on a bucket full of norovirus” thanks.

    But would I/have I bought something that’s been targeted towards me and my pursuits ? Of course I have.. but I’ve only taken the product at face value then done a bit of research to find how viable the product is..

    So, I don’t mind advertising per sé but I’d like more target oriented guff than what is currently a half cocked profile/impression someone has of me.

    Premier Icon slowster
    Free Member

    Ok – really – folk are getting exasperated and I get fed up with folk ( not you) who are unwilling and unable to understand a lifestyle alien to them so really I won’t answer any more points.

    Marketing has minimal effect on me ‘cos 1) I do not buy new goods very often.  and 2) I make decisions based on my own criteria I buy for what that thing is not what it is marketed as.  sometimes these are the same, sometimes it is not.  I do my very best to look behind the marketing and to minimize / mitigate its effects because I do understand much of how it works and many of the tricks used to persuade one to buy that product.

    TJ, I think people are getting exasperated because you are saying that you are different to everyone else (and some people are inferring ‘different’ to mean ‘better’, which I do think is implicit in the way you phrase some of your comments, which have a value judgement that your lifestyle choices are better or even morally superior).

    Marketing is inevitable when there is mass production, and the only way you could remove yourself from it would be to go somewhere where you grew and hunted all your own food, built your own shelter, and were entirely self sufficient (not even bartering for new knife), either that or travel back in time to before the Industrial Revolution.

    To say that marketing (as opposed to advertising or other types of persuasion, which is possibly what the OP really meant) doesn’t work on you, is clearly wrong. In modern society if you have and spend money, then marketing will influence what it is spent on, because marketing will determine what is available.

    As to who is right and who is wrong and the extent to which you and your lifestyle are alien to most others, bear in mind that the choices you make are influenced by the effectiveness of marketing on others. You are only able to buy second hand products which meet your requirements, because the marketing of those products was effective in getting the original purchasers to buy them. If everyone bought cheap crappy furniture that fell apart after only a few years, the second hand furniture that you like to buy simply would not exist. Moreover, marketing also helps to drive technological improvement and advancement. Without marketing, your Rohloff would probably not exist.

    The suggestion that you are above all this, is a bit like a red rag to a bull for some posters. We are all of us in the gutter (even if some of us are looking at the stars).

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    Marketing is inevitable when there is mass production, and the only way you could remove yourself from it would be to go somewhere where you grew and hunted all your own food, built your own shelter, and were entirely self sufficient (not even bartering for new knife), either that or travel back in time to before the Industrial Revolution.

    I think the distinction is between choice and no choice.

    A different example is my water company do “marketing” … I don’t actually have any choice over my water company but they have to do marketing anyway “because legislation say’s so” (in a roundabout way google Water 2020) …

    The thing is they do it but it isn’t influencing what I just have to use it or live without running water.

    I’m not claiming marketing doesn’t affect me … however I’m saying in quite a few areas of my life it affects me in entirely the opposite way I think it was intended.

    In the terms of the thread … whether the OP meant Marketing or Advertising… “does it work on you” … Its fairly disingenuous to claim it’s working if its working negatively… that is the marketing completely missed the goal so it’s actually become a “not bad item” that is heavily discounted or has little 2nd hand value because the marketing missed the mark.

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    Then it all got targeted and I’m more than happy with that………So, I don’t mind advertising per sé but I’d like more target oriented guff than what is currently a half cocked profile/impression someone has of me.

    I had a blinder the other week…. I was reading some news item about the 5 most offensive adverts according to the ASA…. one of them mentioned was McDonalds advert.

    What was amusing was the targeted advertising had managed to serve me up a McDonalds Advert I found “offensive”…. (only mildly so as it referred to only available in Premium McDonalds restaurants) and I find it mildly offensive of behalf of eating establishments everywhere that any McDonald’s is allowed to describe itself as a “restaurant”.

    The funny part was at first I thought this was one of the actual offensive adverts … I didn’t realise it was served up specially… and I though well it’s very mildly offensive but I’m surprised its a Top 5…. before I realised.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    slowster – the value judgement is not by me in any way at all.  I do not consider myself better or superior nor is that the intent in my postings.  again I think this comes down to the fact folk do not understand my attitudes / lifestyle.  No offence is intended at all.  I did not say I was above all this. Its I am indifferent to it.

    Premier Icon Pimpmaster Jazz
    Free Member

    “Marketing – does it work on you?”

    Works on everyone in one way, shape or form.

    Premier Icon plyphon
    Free Member

    TJ it’s just that your posts on this subject come off a bit ‘iamverysmart’

    https://www.reddit.com/r/iamverysmart/

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    “Marketing – does it work on you?”

    Works on everyone in one way, shape or form.

    That still seems disingenuous if the way it “works” is by having entirely the opposite effect that was intended.

    In the widest context then perhaps yes… but in terms of specific items or services it can have entirely the opposite effect than was intended.

    Take a potential holiday destination that either does no conscious advertising or does it but so badly it results in the place being either unpopular or just not popular….

    A few people might actually see that as a good thing… no hordes of tourists, cheap prices and none trying to flog you stuff etc.
    On the other hand anywhere that advertises itself as “undiscovered” might turn off the people who would go? i.e. the decision to market the place as a tourist destination at all becomes a negative to the people that were previously goig and they were presumably hoping to attract more of.

    So yes… the marketing had affected these people who are now not attracted to this “product” … who preferred it before it was thought of as a “product” but not in the intended way.

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Full Member

    targeted advertising has a way to go yet.

    I search for something because I want to buy it.

    I buy it.

    I’m now the least likely person to buy another.

    For the next three weeks I get targeting adverts for the thing I’ve already bought.

    Premier Icon whitestone
    Free Member

    To some extent the answer must be yes since without it you wouldn’t know that you could buy food at those buildings with “Tesco” emblazoned across them or that nice Mr Jones from down the road was a plasterer.

    Whether marketing works in that you seek out brand “foo” in preference to brand “bar” is another matter. That probably comes down to your personal experiences of “foo” and “bar” or that of friends or trusted colleagues.

    You might buy something just because you need it – petrol/diesel is probably the best example. Unless you have a loyalty card the chances are you’ll just fill up at the first filling station you come to. Essentially fuel’s just a commodity that just happens to have a brand associated with it.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    First house I bought was only bought as it seemed to good a bargain too pass over, friends lived in it and the landlady wanted to sell, so I just bought it and kept them on as they paid the mortgage, so I figured I got a house for free. Still there 20 years later….

    Premier Icon johndoh
    Free Member

    @tjagain so if you went to your local corner shop and they had two bottles of washing up liquid – neither of them are your usual brand as the’ve sold out. But hey, you need to wash your dishes…

    Bottle one is 500ml and it’s marketed as ‘Value Washing Up Liquid’ and it’s 90p a bottle.

    Bottle two is also 500ml and it’s marketed as ‘Extra Clean Make Your Glasses Sparkle Platinum Lasts Twice As Long Washing Up Liquid. It’s on at NOW HALF PRICE at 90p a bottle.

    Which would you choose?

    Premier Icon plyphon
    Free Member

    Neither – he waits until a friend is selling their left over 2nd hand washing up liquid and buys it so he can avoid the MaRkEtInG DeMoNs and ensure he is kept free of consumerist culture

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Lols at plypon.

    The answer would be neither because I wouldn’t have run out.  🙂 washing up liquid is something I am very particular about.  I don’t have a “usual brand” but I am very particular about the types of detergents used

    If I really had to it would be the least scented one 😉

    This is actually true although I bet some folk don’t believe me.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    That still seems disingenuous if the way it “works” is by having entirely the opposite effect that was intended.

    The advertisers (not marketers) are way ahead of you.  They know that certain adverts will turn some people on and some people off.  They also know that bad adverts still work.  See the Cilit Bang ads.  They worked.

    If I really had to it would be the least scented one

    And why do they make low-scented washing up liquid?  Cos they know people like you will buy it.  That’s marketing.

    Premier Icon whitestone
    Free Member

    The “what” adverts? Is Cillit Bang the Estonian version of Cilla Black?

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    actually moly on the washing up liquid its almost impossible to find non scented ones bar cheapo ones – ‘cos the scent costs money.  ~Try next time you are in a supermarket.  and cheapo ones use nasty detergents

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    ^^^ only if you choose exist in a bubble of ignorance, otherwise you’d be aware of this:

    https://www.ecoverdirect.com/products/zero-washing-up-liquid/ezerowup.aspx?productid=ezerowup

    🙂

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    Plenty of low scent ones though, including laundry liquid.  Often it’s Ecover.

    I buy Ecover often, cos I know what the bottles look like and I know where to find it in the supermarket…  And I have confidence they won’t smell bad.  All marketing.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    No not me.

    ——————-

    Posted from my iPad Pro.

    Premier Icon Greybeard
    Full Member

    Using marketing as most poster in this thread define it, I’d distinguish between passive marketing – matching the product to the market, which does influence me, and active marketing – trying to make me buy something (advertising, spam, etc), which really annoys me and and makes me less likely to buy.

    Premier Icon cchris2lou
    Full Member

    works on me .

    i have just bought my first 27.5 inc wheel bike after riding a 26 inch since 1990 .

    Premier Icon slowster
    Free Member

    I’d distinguish between passive marketing – matching the product to the market, which does influence me, and active marketing – trying to make me buy something (advertising, spam, etc), which really annoys me and and makes me less likely to buy.

    What you refer to as active marketing sounds more like just bad marketing, i.e. indiscriminate and poorly targeted and failing to communicate or engage with a particular type or sub-set of potential customers in the right way (the right way being one that works and which those potential customers are willing – or even keen – to listen to). It’s not enough to match a product to the market. You need to figure out how best to communicate to that market (or more likely to a market, since their will likely be different potential types of market/customer with different priorities, requirements and preferences) that your product exists and what it is about that product that would be likely to make them want to buy it.

    So glossy adverts and puff pieces in magazines/on websites might not persuade you that the new XYZ mountainbike is what you want, but you might be the sort of person who would happily travel to try a bike out, and for whom – providing the bike is good – a test ride would be enough to make you decide to buy. So for the company selling XYZ mountainbikes, you form part of the potential customer base that would be best served by arranging and publicising demo days (which seems a pretty active form of marketing to me).

    Premier Icon andyrm
    Free Member

    For those who claim to actively NOT buy something because it’s got an additional campaign around it, what’s your reasoning? Genuinely interested to understand that.

    Premier Icon nonk
    Free Member

    Tj old bean have a look at your posting history

    Lots of posts about buying things , things that you’ve seen and like the look of !

    Just because it’s bikes or coffee or a lightweight tent you don’t get to claim you aren’t at all materialistic

    we all have our little needs and obsessions that respond ever so well to marketing

    not trying to be a non mind just saying

    Premier Icon docgeoffyjones
    Full Member

    TJ’s posts advertising his lifestyle are putting me right off it. Does this mean I am unaffected by advertising?

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Full Member

    Anyone as susceptible to wind ups as him is susceptible to marketing.

    Premier Icon curiousyellow
    Free Member

    I’m starting to suspect OP’s post is part of a targeted marketing campaign to annoy TJ. For what purpose remains to be seen, but I’d think thrice about any purchases I’m about to make.

    In the future once our Dataist overlords have all our data, your life will look like this.

    TJ works late.

    TJ’s iPhone tells local takeaway company that he is working late using its GPS.

    TJ’s MyFitnessPal tells company he’s trying to lose weight.

    TJ’s Fitbit tells the company he’s a little bit stressed.

    Correlating TJ’s stress levels with how late he’s at work and his eating habits tells the local company there’s a 99% chance he’ll succumb to a cheap takeaway pizza given the right nudge. Using his browsing data they know he’ll always check STW just before leaving to go home. A bot posts a PSA with a 25% off deal on STW just as TJ’s about to go home.

    Guess what TJ’s having for dinner?

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    Guess what TJ’s having for dinner?

    Ethically sourced Quinoa?

    Premier Icon curiousyellow
    Free Member

    If that’s an adverse reaction to the PSA, then the data the Quinoa company collect can be used to manipulate TJ into ordering that instead.

    TJ’s still being manipulated by advertising/marketing, just not by whom he thinks.

    Premier Icon stumpy01
    Full Member

    I have never succumbed to marketing or advertising. I buy things purely based on my needs & what they offer me.

    My last purchase was a Mars bar. I ate it because it helps me to:

    – work

    – rest

    – play.

    In that order.

    Premier Icon BigButSlimmerBloke
    Free Member

    Has TJ (or indeed the forum) figured out the difference between marketing and advertising yet?

    Sorry if someone’s already posted this, CBA reading all 3 pages

    Advertising is just the selling of the product – TV ads, ad boards etc.  Marketing is the bigger picture, using what is referred to as the 4 P’s –

    Product – what it actually is eg Doc Marten’s shoes/ boot.  If you always buy them, you have been marketed to because the design of DMs is part of the marketing process

    Price – stack it high and sell it cheap or create an aura of exclusivity.  Again, if buy on price (eg fake DMs) you have been marketed to.  Aha, you always buy off Amazon/ebay – not necessarily the cheapest, just creating the carefully cultivated illusion that they are

    Place – where are the shops?  Convenience v cost of location.  Aldi/Lidl, smaller shops and more of them is a marketing decision.  If location is a factor, you have been marketed to.

    Promotion – advertising, “sales”, sports sponsorship, product placement in films, product packaging.

    So, IIRC, tjagain once claimed to be a big fan of DMs (product – tick), he claims to always buy second hand (price – tick) but is only influenced by the location of the shops (place – tick).  3/4 isn’t bad.  Also as advertising is about awareness as much as making you think brand x is better than brand y, you will be aware of products you weren’t aware before seeing some form of advertising for them, eg Papa John’s pizza, I’ve seen adverts but never had one or know where the shops are.  So, unless you never watch TV or go to the cinema and manage to not see a single billboard or online advert (or use Google) then (promotion – tick)

    BTW – a marketing man’s wet dream – someone gullible enough to think they are immune to marketing.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    I understand what TJ means, that he tries consciously to lessen it’s effects on him, I think we all like to think that we do that to a greater or lesser extent. But we all live in a world that is saturated by marketing, and it affects everything from how we look to how we eat to what we choose to listen to, what we watch on telly to how we interact on the internet, and what sites we choose to do that on…

    I think you’d have to move to the Highlands of Papua New Guinea to get away from it TBH

    Premier Icon BigButSlimmerBloke
    Free Member

    I think you’d have to move to the Highlands of Papua New Guinea to get away from it TBH

    Nice bit of marketing for the highlands of PNG

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    haha, subliminal even…

    Premier Icon emsz
    Free Member

    I’m a woman in my mid twenties, “does marketing work on me” is like asking me if I breathe.

    Premier Icon davidtaylforth
    Free Member

    I’m a woman in my mid twenties, “does marketing work on me” is like asking me if I breathe.

    Apparently sometimes people stop breathing and they experience a sense of calm, peacefulness, unconditional love and a being of light at the end of a tunnel.

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