Marathon with little training – Runningtrackworld

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  • Marathon with little training – Runningtrackworld
  • Chuck Morris
    Member

    At the start of the year I booked a place on the greater Manchester marathon. The first three weeks of training went well then I was hit with illiotibial band syndrome. This stopped me running for two weeks. I started back running and the ITB problem was still present, so I decided to give it another three weeks rest as well as seeing a doctor. This pretty much ended running the marathon prospects.

    While I’ve not been running I’ve been stretching the ITB, foam rolling and doing strengthening exercises in the gym.

    Now I’ve started running again, managing a 6k and a 10k run without any ITB pain. The marathon is two weeks this Sunday away. If in the run up to the marathon I suffer no ITB pain, should I run it?

    stox
    Member

    Rather you than me. Guess it depends on how fast / comfortable you want it to be.

    IanMunro
    Member

    I think the sensible answer is no.
    I’ve no idea if you’re sensible though.
    If you’re not sensible, then I doubt any running in the next two weeks will have any useful effect on your performance. Which is good as you then don’t have to worry about if you’re doing too much or too little 🙂

    Premier Icon shadowrider
    Subscriber

    I ran the Manchester marathon last year, it was a very flat course, but it was still tough. 26 miles with little training will be hard going, unless you are naturally super fit. I’m running the Brighton marathon this year and have had a lot of niggly injuries but I think I’m good to go. Personally I wouldn’t run with only a 10k under my belt, it will hurt you.

    Anna B
    Member

    Running a marathon will make the ITB hurt again I should think, even if it doesn’t hurt in the run up. I ran my first mara last year with fairly good training and it was still really tough. Like……really really unpleasantly tough. I’d say don’t do it, and I’m not one for discouraging people to do stuff!

    Do it. You’ll be fine. What’s the worst that can happen?

    monkeychild
    Member

    My heavily overweight unfit mate completed the London marathon. You’ll be reet 🙂

    samuri
    Member

    That’s great isn’t it? I still struggle to do more than 10k and if I do that I’ll be on my hands and knees for a few days. I’m very fit, can cycle 200 miles in one go and yet monkeychild’s fat mate can run further than me.

    Neil F
    Member

    Really depends how fit you are. Are you normally a regular runner or have you just started?
    I reckon you’d manage, slowly, it’ll hurt, and you’ll be in pain for at least a week afterwards. But fuckit, you only live once. 😆

    djglover
    Member

    If you can do 21 miles tonight and feel ok tomorrow then go for it 😉

    On the other hand, if the shorter runs put you out for 3 weeks imagine what the marathon will do!

    IanMunro
    Member

    I’m very fit, can cycle 200 miles in one go and yet monkeychild’s fat mate can run further than me.

    The devil’s in the small-print though. His mate ‘completed’ the London marathon, no mention of running the whole distance 😉

    Premier Icon terrahawk
    Subscriber

    It’ll be reet. Just wear a chicken costume or something and walk some of it if you get knackered.

    Edric 64
    Member

    I started running last November mainly 5ks joined a club and got up to 10k .Three weeks ago I injured my calf and couldnt run for 3 weeks .I ran a 10k on Sunday in 49.27. and can hardly walk still !! I dont think a marathon on so little training is a good idea. !!3 weeks off and im ruined !!

    joshvegas
    Member

    I ran the old edinburgh marathon course with little to no specific training but very fit. I got away with it but I wouldnt do it again it hurt alot and for a long time after

    Transfer it to someone a give yourself a fair crack at it next time.

    thecaptain
    Member

    Just say no. It’s one thing doing it off little training – quite another doing it off the back of repeated injuries having stopped you from training. I think you’ve got a good chance of making things quite a lot worse. Long-term injury is not much fun – better to build up really slowly, staying injury-free.

    qwerty
    Member

    I reckon you’ll collect further injuries if you attempt it. A personal trainer ex Royal Marine guy I used to know reckoned one year of conditioning running before even starting marathon training, if you want to avoid injury, sound advice. I’ve mopped up at the rear end of the London Marathon several times and it’s a sorry sight of mind over injury types. Met loads of people whose determination to complete a marathon (face/charity cash etc) has left them with life long injuries that have put a stop to ever running again & curtailed other activities they enjoyed.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Whenever I hear of someone surprisingly finishing a marathon of a half-marathon, I’m always less surprised when I hear the time.

    They reckon a good marker is that you can run/ride in one go whatever you can run/ride in a normal week. But, that might vary; because I’ve been riding a long time, I can usually do 2 weeks worth of riding in one go.

    Chuck Morris
    Member

    Thanks for the input!

    I think I will give it a miss. I really don’t want any more injuries especially more ITB pain.

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    You wouldn’t be the first or last to do it off such rubbish preparation. You’ll probably not enjoy it though and possibly do yourself a mischief. Marathon is about 7x the distance of a 10k 🙂

    theflatboy
    Member

    Marathon is about 7x the distance of a 10k

    It’s 42k.

    irelanst
    Member

    IMO running a marathon is primarily a psychological challenge you’re generally running at a conservative pace (I’m not talking about Elites, just joggers trying to get round). The main thing is that you will be running for a long time, and that’s a lot of time for doubts to enter your mind.

    The things that kept me going were firstly I’d done hours of training that I didn’t want to waste, and also the fact that I knew I could get to 22miles because I’d done it a few times in training and once I’d reached that I wasn’t going to bail. You may be a great deal more mentally tough than me, but the fact that you are questioning your fitness already isn’t a positive sign, wait until you get to the headwind section at 18miles and your mind will be playing all sorts of tricks!

    cbmotorsport
    Member

    Why bother? It will be hellish, you run a very high risk of injuring yourself even further, it may put you off running another one because you’ll hate it. You’ll run a shit time and have to tell all your friends it took you Xhrs+ …..the list goes on.

    Postpone, pick another one a little way away, train properly, get strong and super fit, do a few 10k’s, Half Marathons and long training runs leading up to it and really enjoy it.

    cbmotorsport
    Member

    I should add that I suffered from ITBS for years, and never really got over it. It’s the main reason I quit running and started cycling again.

    If you get ITB pain at any point during this marathon (and it’s highly likely you will) you’ll be walking. No amount of ‘mental strength’ is going to allow you to jog through the pain.

    The body needs to be conditioned to cope with endurance events like marathons, it gets stronger to cope with the demands. This is why you train. Once you’re aerobically fit enough to run, training is all about conditioning your muscles, and joints. You haven’t done this.

    Chuck Morris
    Member

    cbmotorsport – what did you try for the ITB injury?

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    It’s 42k.

    I can do the maths, but it’ll feel a lot more than 4.2x as far as a 10k. Just as the halfway point is probably somewhere around 17 miles 😉

    cbmotorsport
    Member

    cbmotorsport – what did you try for the ITB injury?

    Foam roller, ice, sports physio, sports massage, stretches stretches stretches, rest, run, injured. Repeat.

    The thing that gave me the longest injury free running period was switching my shoes to motion control shoes, even though I wasn’t a big pronator.

    I drew the line at cortisone injections.

    surfer
    Member

    Foam roller, ice, sports physio, sports massage, stretches stretches stretches, rest, run, injured. Repeat.

    Your ITB is adhered to your femur. It cant be stretched!
    Its inflammation around the ITB in the area that it passes over a boney part of the knww with each stride. You have to reduce the inflammation otherwise it will simply reoccur.
    NSAID’s and ice will help with that but be prepared for a long time off. I had it for 11 months and foolishly had Cortisone,. Made no difference and eventually disappeared as quickly as it arrived.

    cbmotorsport
    Member

    Can or can’t?

    I’m assuming you meant can’t.

    I had a good sports physio, I think the stretches and exercises were to make me more flexible in other areas, where I had weaknesses to try and stop the rubbing.

    Edit: you sneaky ninja editer

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    There’s some new research linking itb issues to weak hip abductors. Been trying to strengthen mine and it seems to help more than stretching and foam rollers.

    A physio once told me that trying to stretch the itb is like trying to stretch and old gym climbing rope.

    Chuck Morris
    Member

    Why is Cortisone the last resort?

    I’ve tried a foam roller before but it didn’t really help the first time and haven’t kept up with it. I’ve heard before that the ITB can’t be stretched so I don’t really bother stretches.

    Building my quads seemed to help me but I don’t know if I’m fully rid of it yet.

    theflatboy
    Member

    stever – Member
    I can do the maths, but it’ll feel a lot more than 4.2x as far as a 10k. Just as the halfway point is probably somewhere around 17 miles

    I thought that might be what you meant, but “distance” rather than “effort” made me wonder, and I’m too pedantic not to correct something like that… 😳

    surfer
    Member

    I think there is evidence that lnks it to tissue damage and I certainly read that it is harmful to tendons and can cause rupture.

    Been trying to strengthen mine and it seems to help more than stretching and foam rollers.

    IME the majority of injuries are related to muscular imbalances/trauma etc and they have to be addressed. There are possibly some areas where stretching helps (some where it is counter productive) however it gets trotted out as a cure all as soon as somebody mentions a running injury! Muscles dont really stretch and their is little or no evidence that stretching either contributes to the healing or stops the occurrence of injuries.

    surfer
    Member

    A physio once told me that trying to stretch the itb is like trying to stretch and old gym climbing rope.

    A physio recommended a stretch for me a few months ago and I asked him how long I should hold it for. He said.. “dont know really. no less than 30 seconds but no more than 24 hours” “there is no real evidence”!

    mogrim
    Member

    IME the majority of injuries are related to muscular imbalances/trauma etc and they have to be addressed. There are possibly some areas where stretching helps (some where it is counter productive) however it gets trotted out as a cure all as soon as somebody mentions a running injury! Muscles dont really stretch and their is little or no evidence that stretching either contributes to the healing or stops the occurrence of injuries.

    +1 – there’s little or no real evidence that stretching helps – something I found surprising when I tried searching for it, you’d have thought that a sport like running was popular enough to warrant a bit more research effort.

    Anecdotally, however, I’ve noticed the ITB I’m currently suffering from has got a lot better since I started going to the physio (massages) and stretching twice a day. While you may not be able to stretch the ITB itself, you can certainly increase mobility in the rest of the leg, and this may in turn relieve pressure on the affected area.

    Next step: trying to work out what actually caused it in the first place. Current plan is gentle return to running, and regular weights to ensure no muscle imbalance.

    Mush
    Member

    I had ITB issues last year and only really resolved it when I changed my gait. I now run with a shorter stride and a higher cadence. Also did some core work to tackle those hip abductors and glutes mentioned above.

    I had a couple of weeks off running ahead of a half in October, but could cycle to maintain some cardio fitness and did okay. I know some people struggle to ride with ITB, but perhaps worth a shot?

    I’m running the Paris marathon in three weeks (my first). While I have had a few other injuries and setbacks (plantar fasciitis and a viral chest thingy) I have followed a plan pretty closely for the past four months and feel reasonably confident of achieving my target of sub 3:30.

    In your situation, I would seriously consider a no-go unless you’re prepared for a long walk.

    the teaboy
    Member

    What are you trying to achieve?

    A friend did little training due to a knee problem but got loads of sponsorship so felt that she had to do it. She pretty much walked it in 6+ hours and was delighted (but took a week off work to recover).

    If ‘completing’ is your aim, do it, take it easy and walk lots.

    If you want to go fast, I’d wait until you’re fit enough to do yourself justice.

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