Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 132 total)
  • Made up words that have become part of everyday speech in your family.
  • Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    Fribblers.

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
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    Any residue the washer upper hasn’t cleaned off properly is called spobble.

    ossify
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    Punge = 💩

    Comes from the little ones and their nappies: whew that’s pungent one = must be full of punge.

    DrJ
    Member

    Swimsuit is called “wimson” because it was what my daughter called it when she was very small.

    Premier Icon cynic-al
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    My niece’s partner is called Bodo.

    We call him Bodewell (not to his face obvs).

    Premier Icon lunge
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    Ours are mostly food based for some reason.
    Bananas are called bongalees. No idea why.
    Eggs are weggs.
    Steak is snake.

    Duvet is pronounced phonetically, dove-ette

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    Jalapenos are Jelly Bingos

    geomickb
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    Huggle!

    🙂

    Premier Icon swanny853
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    ‘Iffinity’

    A hybrid of affinity and authority. As in “I’m an iffinity on that” meaning that you both have an affinity for and are an authority on something.

    Source- a friend who mumbled ‘affinity’ when they meant ‘authority’.

    The problem is we have all now started using it in conversation with other people.

    Also- ‘pan-yays’ are things you use to carry things on the back of your bike.

    kayla1
    Member

    Accumbulate – like accumulate but less intentional. Things tend to accumbulate.

    Ponk – the game of snooker, so named for the noise the cue makes when it strikes the cue ball. You can play or watch ponk, and while playing ponk you can also find yourself ponked.

    Le Ponking – French for ponk.

    Narmaleen? – do you know what I mean?

    Seemaleen? – do you see what I mean?

    Stanmaleen? – do you understand what I mean?

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
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    ditto for dove-ette
    Spaghetti is spagoogy after our daughters attempts as a toddler
    Squirrels are squiggles from my nephew’s mispronunciation

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
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    Fuzzbuckets
    null

    Highland Ewoks
    null

    DrJ
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    The problem is we have all now started using it in conversation with other peopl

    That can be a problem!! Especially when kids use made-up words for pissing and crapping and people have no idea what they’re on about.

    ton
    Member

    dorpest cherru

    as in darkest peru, where paddinton came from.

    my 28 year old son hates it when I ask him where Paddington came from…… ;o)

    Premier Icon senor j
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    Wembley- stain on underpants post wee.
    Had to explain to my seven y/o that probably only half a dozen folk in Cumbria might have an idea what he’s on about.

    DrP
    Member

    ‘doggy juice’…

    Orange squash served in an Ikea doggy beaker thing. All squash is now “doggy juice”!

    DrP

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    That can be a problem!! Especially when kids use made-up words for pissing and crapping and people have no idea what they’re on about.

    Chooch.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
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    Dad was a navy radio operator in the war and therefore an expert in morse code. He taught us how to spell BANANA in Morse, DAH DIT DIT DIT DIT DAH DAH DIT DIT DAH DAH DIT DIT DAH. From then on bananas were always known as DAH DIT DIT DITs

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Eemart

    This means helmet.
    A young friend back in our Leigh Park days actually used to pronounce the word helmet in this way. We enjoyed this so much we kept the word in our family.

    Moozer – the source of any mysterious itch. An as yet unidentified species of tiny insect which exists only to irritate people.

    “Why are you scratching all the time?

    “Ah’m hoachin’ wi’ moozers”

    Premier Icon lister
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    Bumby. As in ‘he’s so bumby, he is the bumbiest’ when looking at our lovely cat who is called Sullivan but is usually referred to as Mr Bumby.

    I have no idea why.

    Premier Icon TiRed
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    Soorly

    Mixture of sore and poorly

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    Dad was a navy radio operator in the war and therefore an expert in morse code. He taught us how to spell BANANA in Morse, DAH DIT DIT DIT DIT DAH DAH DIT DIT DAH DAH DIT DIT DAH. From then on bananas were always known as DAH DIT DIT DITs

    Ha^

    My granddad was a radio operator in WWII too. It saved his life as the rest of his unit got hit but he was inside a vehicle on the radio ☹.

    Anyway… during many a conversation with him his hand would start “keying”. PTSD, habbit or just tapping out what he really thought rather than what he was saying out loud? Who knows.

    Premier Icon edhornby
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    Italian father in law wrote a note put onto the kitchen table (many years ago) asking MiL and kids to put out ‘willie the bin’ as he misheard wheelie bin

    IHN
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    Wangy; any veg that is past its best but still edible

    “Best use those carrots up, they’re looking a bit wangy”

    Premier Icon nickc
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    Faffon (said in a French accent)

    The general faff of mtbers before the start of a ride, coined on an Alps trips to designate the French version, but also the heightened level of pre ride faff that big days in the mountains tend to produce as a side effect of the size of the coming ride.</span>

    Premier Icon rossburton
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    “Jarbees”, from the word my toddler son used for pyjamas.

    “Moobag”, a grumpy child. My daughter was a massive moobag when she was about five and even bedtime was a huge battle.

    Premier Icon senor j
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    F**king Pokemon!

    Premier Icon nedrapier
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    cwushion = cushion.

    A mate of mine said it when a few of us were round his house as teenagers. We took the piss, obviously, but he was adamant that it was pronounced with a “w”. He went to get his older brother, who backed him 100%.

    So who knows where that started, but it’s always tickled me, my wife’s heard me tell the story a few times, and we probably now say “cwushion” more often than cushion. Our eldest is a the “soaking everything up” stage, so ridicule could await him.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
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    Contraption – word used to describe a clothes airier until I was about 19 and my housemate looked at me blankly.

    My parents refer to the dogs toys as “nu nu’s”, presumably a relic of something I called a cuddly toy as a kid (and those are now the dogs). Which is funny because it’s what my OH calls her………..

    finbar
    Member

    Torrentious. As in, “I’m not riding in that rain, it’s torrentious”.

    Also Fairy Liquid is Fairy Up Liquid. Not really sure why, a housemate at university brought that one with him and it’s stuck with me ever since.

    kayla1
    Member

    Also Fairy Liquid is Fairy Up Liquid

    We have Fairy Up or Sqezy Up too 😆

    The remote control for the TV has always, and forever shall be, known as the Plunker

    DrJ
    Member

    Italian father in law wrote a note put onto the kitchen table (many years ago) asking MiL and kids to put out ‘willie the bin’ as he misheard wheelie bin

    Foreigners are an endless source of fun.

    French person called doughnuts “duffnuts” and Big Whopper “Big Hooper”. Colleague wrote “Toed” instead of “Towed”. Another was making a list of stuff we need, and how much. Someone said “a shit load” and he wrote down “sheet load”.

    DrJ
    Member

    The remote control for the TV has always, and forever shall be, known as the Plunker

    Zapper. Or as my daughter used to say “buddy apper” because she’d heard us saying “where’s the bloody zapper?”.

    Premier Icon Dorset_Knob
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    “heined”

    as in ‘what you just did was heinous; it heined me’

    a word I stole from a mate at college many years ago, and which should exist

    Premier Icon senor j
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    Remote is the clacker in ours 😬

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    The remote control for the TV has always, and forever shall be, known as the Plunker

    Zapper at our house too.

    Premier Icon stevied
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    We don’t go sledging in our house, apparently it’s called Peterbogering..

    Premier Icon dove1
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    Biddleebo for wheelbarrow after my son’s young pronunciation.

    He also used to pronounce robber as ‘robbar’ so now any word in our house that ends in ‘er’ is pronounced with ‘ar’ at the end. e.g. @senor j’s clacker would be the clackar in our house.

    My son is 19 now. Oh, how he laughs at our deliberate mispronunciations. 🙂

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 132 total)

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