Mac users – what antivirus software is recommended?

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  • Mac users – what antivirus software is recommended?
  • peterfile
    Member

    None.

    I was under the impression that the risk of a virus on OSX was pretty small.

    My MPB has only needed to be restarted once in a few years, that’s about it.

    tinsy
    Member

    I didnt know anyone bothered on a Mac.

    I’m now using Avast.

    Never had a problem with viruses on mac. However, my antivirus did detect one – so they are out there.

    samuri
    Member

    People bother but you’d have to really work at getting the code on there.

    The best thing you can do is keep the thing patched up to date, you’ll not have any problems then. That’s a good piece of advice for any computer too.

    warton
    Member

    I’ve ran my mac for three years plus. never had an issue with viruses, I’m not running any anti virus.

    Premier Icon bigblackshed
    Subscriber

    Antivirus is built in to OSX. Just keep the software and security updates, up to date. 2009 iMac and the only time I’ve had to restart and use Time Machine was when Apple recalled it to change the hardrive. And that was completely painless.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Unless you have to satisfy PCI I wouldn’t bother. ClamAV is not bad for free if you’re happy using the terminal for configuring and updating.

    Premier Icon Farticus
    Subscriber

    Thanks all … When I got my original Mac I didn’t bother but then did after a few scare stories. Maybe I’ll risk it.

    sharkbait
    Member

    4 macs here, no AV, no problem.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    Sophos is free for OSX.

    With the increased popularity of the OSX operating system it is being targeted more and more for viruses. Although it’s hard to get a virus on OSX I don’t think it will be long until it becomes more prolific.

    Even having an AV there to scan downloaded files before running them is a good idea.

    Premier Icon Farticus
    Subscriber

    I’ve got an old Mac running Intego Security Barrier, and a nice new iMac is turning up today.

    Is Intego still OK or is there anything better out there?

    Thanks.

    mickyfinn
    Member

    Sophos it’s free and very lightweight.

    Mackem
    Member

    I use Avast – free and excellent. I get the odd warning on some websites.

    Same recommendation for a PC btw.

    retro83
    Member

    Sandwich – Member

    Unless you have to satisfy PCI I wouldn’t bother. ClamAV is not bad for free if you’re happy using the terminal for configuring and updating.

    Ah, you want clamXav. Nice GUI for Clam, works really well.

    http://www.clamxav.com/

    sharkbait – Member

    4 macs here, no AV, no problem.

    And how do you know that with no AV? You could have all manner of crudware running and never know about it.

    The OS does not include AV as someone said above..

    Sophos with Time Machine as backup. No issues yet…

    sharkbait
    Member

    And how do you know that with no AV?

    No slow down, no random emails being sent (all email is gmail), no extra software being installed, blah blah blah.
    I’ve been running Macs since 1991 and never had a problem with one other than a lightening strike taking out the modem port on one (yeah modems remember them… maybe not).
    I wish I could say the same of the PCs in my office.

    Edit: here’s a decent article

    And I forgot to add that all our computers sit behind a hardware firewall (Sonicwall in our case and not just the limited firewall within the router.)

    You can buy used firewalls on eBay for about £30-40 and add a very good layer of protection but there is some configuring to do which would not suit many people. Just replaced one as the internal fan had gone and I just paid £5 for one that is £250 new.

    Premier Icon Imabigkidnow
    Subscriber

    I run iAntivirus .. but that’s what a magazine (MACFormat I think) suggested when I first got one a few years ago and bought a couple of mags as background. Even the Mag said it you didn’t have to worry too much but could use it in a belt and braces approach.

    Someone suggested I didn’t *need* it like PC’s because unlike embedding things in random little bits of code on Microsoft where stuff is layered and interconnected on a Mac it needs to be pretty much a standalone program to infect it .. or something like that so as long as you’re half sensible about the apps you download and run, and where you download them from you should be OK. .. otherwise because MAC OS market share is so low people don’t bother with creating bad things so much.

    I still run one anyway and it does have a database of things (programs I guess) that updates daily.

    sharkbait
    Member

    so as long as you’re half sensible about the apps you download and run

    Yep, and if kids are using it make sure they have their own login which has no administrative rights. Not only will they be unable to install anything even if they wanted to but you can also apply parental controls.

    purpleyeti
    Member

    sophos here, and people saying you don’t need it are just idiots. we have a nice collection of public and private osx malware in the office and all the latest crome/java/firefox exploits have been rolled into the broswer attack kit’s like blackhole.

    chvck
    Member

    The other issue with everyone using no AV is that if/when someone does find a nice exploit that’ll let their virus get passed around is that it’s going to spread like wildfire! That said, I probably wouldn’t bother on a mac, a little bit of common sense goes a long way when it comes to not getting infected (although not infallible).

    retro83
    Member

    purpleyeti – Member

    sophos here, and people saying you don’t need it are just idiots. we have a nice collection of public and private osx malware in the office and all the latest crome/java/firefox exploits have been rolled into the broswer attack kit’s like blackhole.

    yep

    sharkbait – Member

    And how do you know that with no AV?

    No slow down, no random emails being sent (all email is gmail), no extra software being installed, blah blah blah.
    I’ve been running Macs since 1991 and never had a problem with one other than a lightening strike taking out the modem port on one (yeah modems remember them… maybe not).
    I wish I could say the same of the PCs in my office.

    Edit: here’s a decent article

    And I forgot to add that all our computers sit behind a hardware firewall (Sonicwall in our case and not just the limited firewall within the router.)

    You can buy used firewalls on eBay for about £30-40 and add a very good layer of protection but there is some configuring to do which would not suit many people. Just replaced one as the internal fan had gone and I just paid £5 for one that is £250 new.

    Sorry but that’s just not right. A firewall is no protection against library bugs, browser bugs etc, and neither is running a non-admin account. Key loggers and so on can run perfectly well using a normal account with absolutely no outwardly visible signs.

    purpleyeti
    Member

    also av isn’t a silver bullet it misses loads of stuff, i’ve just been doing some work to prove this to a client by modifying a known exploit to bypass their corporate av.

    damion
    Member

    Apple virus’ are out there, but the built in file quarantine system (XProtect) is updated quite regularly and does a reasonable job:

    http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac/news/?newsid=3436923

    however isnt perfect:

    http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac/news/?newsid=3427714

    retro83
    Member

    sharkbait – Member
    (yeah modems remember them… maybe not).

    I’ll have you know I did my time waiting for ascii bewbs to download with a 14.4

    sharkbait
    Member

    A firewall is no protection against library bugs, browser bugs etc,

    I didn’t say that, I was saying that a decent firewall is a great addition to any network (plus they very likely lock down the ports that a virus would probably use to communicate externally.)

    purpleyeti
    Member

    what port tcp 80,443 and udp 53?

    xiphon
    Member

    No AV over here on OSX.

    It’s a risk assessment – how likely are you to get infected?

    chojin
    Member

    Having no AV: It’s akin to not wearing a condom, not all STDs have symptoms you know 😛

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

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