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  • LVT and underfloor heating?
  • ac505
    Free Member

    We are currently renovating our kitchen and are planning underfloor heating due to lack of wall space for rads. Joists are in, trays for underfloor heating going in over then next few days, OSB (I think) will be going on top of the wet heating.

    I need to make a decision pretty soon on flooring, initial plan was to put an engineered oak board down, but then we thought something like Karndean or Amtico may be more robust. Our builder has suggested that Amtico can become very creaky with underfloor heating, I have no experience of whether this is generally the case or not. So question to the group, is LVT a good/bad idea with underfloor heating, would I be better with wood or better again with a ceramic tile? I know the LVT and engineered board are limited to 27c, so a consideration also.

    thanks.

    Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    As long as a high temp adhesive is used and the floor is prepped properly the LVT shouldn’t move anywhere once glued down.
    Tile is the most hard wearing and best for underfloor heating IMO as it acts like a big thermal store, after that LVT and last, engineered timber as if anything it’s a slight insulator.

    Tom83
    Full Member

    I’ve not heard of Amtico becoming creaky before. As Mr Saddles said, using the correct adhesive you shouldn’t have any problems.

    I’d lean towards tiles or lvt with ufh, over wood, personally.

    nickewen
    Free Member

    Whatever you do, do not get the LVT click stuff.. I’ve just dealt with the environmental disaster of disposing of 60sqm of the utter shit that had only been down just over 2 years. I reckon over half of the joins had failed in the high traffic areas leading to it coming apart, corners snapping, lifting, etc. We’ve had to dismantle half the kitchen to get the new flooring down. Never ever again.

    Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    Very much as Nickewen says, I wouldn’t have click LVT anywhere near a job or house of mine.  It’s not better than fancy finished laminate flooring, it’s sold and bought by builders and home owners as a great universal product because it’s easy to lay and doesn’t require much skill, but it’s really not good.  Maybe that’s the ‘creaky’ LVT the builders was talking about?

    Tom83
    Full Member

    If it’s lvt that’s creaking, I’d assume the floor isn’t 100% level. The t&g on it is so brittle if it’s not laid properly. We always lay a renovation screed, or overboard before laying it. Touch fake wood, we’ve not had any issues so far.


    @nickewen
    was kitchen installed on top of the lvt? If it was, it was installed incorrectly.

    leffeboy
    Full Member

    Isn’t the OSB a bit of an insulator and will mean the underfloor heating will need to be hotter?  I know that with ours we have screed on top of the pipes and then tiles on top of that.  Both the vinyl and the OSB have higher R values than the tile/screed.  Vinyl is normally thinner than tiles which will help but the OSB is thicker.  I’m a bit surprised but I’m also not an installer, I just did the calcs for mine a long time ago

    Killer
    Free Member

    We’ve just fitted LVT onto our underfloor heating and works fine.

    Tiles provide a loner thermal store, but would take much longer to get warm. the LVT is very thin so rapid response.
    The cost of the tiles and fitting put us off.
    even getting expensive well recommended brand still worked out cheaper overall.

    Rough cost we were quoted to fit was ~30£ psm for fresh super level screed and glue.
    WE ended up using the UFH heating screed with some extra prep and has worked pretty well with only a few snags so far.

    Agree with above, Glue stuff not click.

    we were recommended PolyFlor tiles as being equally good to Karndean in quality but cheaper. Not had it long enough to see if it really is hard wearing.

    ac505
    Free Member

    Cheers all. The osb is a necessary part of the buildup as we are using a wet heating system that sits in trays in between the joists.
    sounds like LVT could be a good solution, just need to find something we like which I’m sure won’t be too difficult

    Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    You can’t fit LVT straight to OSB, so it would need overlaying with SP101 grade 6mm ply, but you need to staple or screw that down, could be dodgy if the pipes are just under the OSB layer?  Must happen all the time though as you won’t be the first person ever to want LVT over your wet flooring system.

    bigfoot
    Free Member

    as abovr tiles are the best for heat transfer, although they are still limited to a max temp of only a degree or so more than LVT/engineered wood.

    i would also be very cautious about laying tiles over a joisted wet UFH system. the flooring would need to be solid then overboarding with backerboard and then a decent decoupling membrane. also with adding the initial boards over the joists you are in effect insulting the tiles slightly so will loose some of the benefit.

    LVT works well on a job i was on recently but that was a solid screeded floor.

    if you went enginered which i what i’m doing at home in one room which has wet UFH and joists it’s best to put a thicker structrual rated enginered floor down straight onto the joists to limit the insulating effect of timber.

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