Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)
  • Lost: Bottle
  • Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    Right then – who can help me find it? I don’t know when it went, but I know it has gone.

    I’m riding ok. I had a smash and bust my thumb at the start of December. I’ve ridden ok since then. I’ve had the usual quota of near misses since and it doesn’t seem to have affected 95% of my riding.

    But now I just cannot bring myself to ride some ‘features’ I have ridden before. They tend to be drops and jumps where a nosedive would result in an OTB. I’ve stood in front of them, behind them, to the side of them. I’ve rolled my bike over them from the side to show it could roll if it all went tits up. I’ve visualized riding them, I know how they ride, because I’ve ridden them all before, more than once.

    So, how do I get my bottle back?

    1) Just don’t worry about it and reassure myself that one day I will go for it again and that (trail sabs and landowners notwithstanding) there’ll always be another time?

    2) Go to these features with the specific intention of riding them. Call myself all the names under the sun and don’t allow myself to do any other riding until they are ‘conquered’?

    3) Invent an alter ego character who can ride and doesn’t give a shit, then ride ‘in character’?

    4) Have a couple of pints in a nearby pub then go for it?

    5) Anything else?

    I don’t think coaching would do any good – this is a ‘top two inches’ thing as I know I can ride these thing technique-wise.

    Go on, I’m on your couch (metaphorically), analyse me and see what you can suggest.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    You just have to build up confidence to them, that involves just setting targets, if you are worried about one drop, then find less dangerous ones that are similar in terms of drop, or manufacture it through practice, progression is key though, then you have a picture in your head of being able to do it on the ones you’re struggling on.

    Also having people there to push you a little is good, showing you the speed and run in and that kind of takes some of the worry away, just make sure it’s not someone who’s miles better at that stuff, as you then get the same intimidation of the feature, but now more pressure to do it!

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Full Member

    Maybe your bottle is just tucked out of sight by the front wheel? Do a MASSIVE endo and you might be able to see it?

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Full Member

    Beer good, throw a whisky in each

    Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    @argee

    That all looks sound advice. I’m going to have to look at some slightly less intimidating ‘versions’.

    The thing you say about not following someone who is ‘miles better’ at the type of obstacle allows me to make a point here. Anyone who rides them and doesn’t crash is infinitely better at riding them in my eyes. The mere act of riding it entitles them to a ‘1’ in my head, when I’m on a zero. And there are no options other than one and zero! That is why I am characterising this as 100% ‘bottle’. I know I can ride them all because I have before, more than once and in a way that would look (to the average rider) fairly ‘competently’.

    Anyway – thanks for the advice – I need to find some stuff to build up on perhaps.

    Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    Beer good, throw a whisky in each

    I don’t like whiskey, unfortunately. Or am I just scared of it?

    🤔

    Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    Maybe your bottle is just tucked out of sight by the front wheel? Do a MASSIVE endo and you might be able to see it?

    I don’t ride 29ers, so I doubt the bottle is hidden behind my tiny wheels.

    😉

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Full Member

    Ah but you mentioned a fear of nose diving, so was just suggesting endos as a method to become more comfortable in that position to perhaps alleviate your fear, obviously and endo is completely different to doing a drop or jump, but it will show you how steep you can get your bike pointing downwards depending on your body position. Maybe it would help, maybe not, guess depends how much steep stuff your ride down happily without jumps/drops in it.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    Endo’s won’t help in those positions, the opposite is more beneficial, i.e. manuals, as knowing how to get the front up and being confident you can control it means you can go over drops or jumps a little slower without the horror of the front wheel falling down fast!

    Skills days are good though, find a small drop, practice landing front wheel first, back wheel first, both wheels at the same time, then tweak speeds and so on, same with a short double or gap, practice take offs and landings and just play, again you can err on safety by finding a short tabletop that’s maybe more of a shallow landing, same with gaps, maybe find a slight step up, or one that’s more of a jump with a landing zone.

    I mess about with this a lot up FoD and Nibely/Dursley, if you’re around the area happy to watch you practice with a bowl of popcorn ;o)

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    I’ve found that riding with less good riders tends to remind me that I’m not that bad really. Also sessioning things that are slightly scary but not so scary I won’t try them.

    You need to hunt down features that are like your nemeses but manageable and then ride them until they’re inconsequential. A great coach like Jedi can help a lot, tidying up technique, removing mistakes that increase risk and getting you riding progressive features.

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    Not making assumptions but just because you’ve ridden these features successfully before it doesn’t mean your technique is correct. Why do you worry about going over the bars now?
    Skills coaching could be just what you need. There may be something that needs tweaking that would help. Equally, it could be just fine but having an impartial coach confirm that may help in your mind. Either way, half a day concentrating on these things is no bad way to spend time.

    Premier Icon submarined
    Full Member

    6) get a tow in from a mate.
    Lost count of the number of times I’ve done this on features I’ve been worried about and suddenly realised ‘crap, too late to pull out now, best commit properly’.
    And I’m not sure it’s ever ended badly.
    When I do it solo, however…

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “ Not making assumptions but just because you’ve ridden these features successfully before it doesn’t mean your technique is correct.”

    This is a great point!

    “ 6) get a tow in from a mate.”

    This really doesn’t work for me – wish it did!

    Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    “ Not making assumptions but just because you’ve ridden these features successfully before it doesn’t mean your technique is correct.”

    This is a great point!

    It is. I’ve probably become too focused on “ride it without crashing = success”.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    dannyh
    Full Member

    This is a great point!

    It is. I’ve probably become too focused on “ride it without crashing = success”.

    That’s pretty much doing features in a nutshell, it’s when you start looking at features and thinking too much that they become harder!

    Premier Icon brads
    Free Member

    I suffer the very same thing
    Worst thing is , it’s going to slow that causes the worst effects

    The answer is to follow someone else in.

    Premier Icon halifaxpete
    Full Member

    Group rides help with me, a mix of peer pressure/encouragement/heckling and seeing other riders of the same ability commit to drops/chutes ect. Mojo’s back recently after practicing on steep local shiz.

    Premier Icon malv173
    Full Member

    Before reading the post, my initial thought was Fidlock.

    But after reading, there’s lots of good advice. I was going to write pretty much what Chief said.

    If you aren’t feeling it, don’t do it. It doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. Just enjoy riding.

    Premier Icon reeksy
    Free Member

    Maybe you’ve nothing left to prove.

    Premier Icon dannyh
    Full Member

    Maybe you’ve nothing left to prove.

    I can assure you that is not the case!

    Premier Icon DirtyLyle
    Free Member

    I destroyed my left shoulder in August 2018, and was only started MTBing again in May last year. i found that even the mildest obstacles gave me THE FEAR (little roots felt like massive booby traps), which I gradually overcame by riding them as slowly as I felt comfortable. However for more technical stuff what’s worked is sessioning different trails 5 or 6 times, and then building up to more technical ones when I’m completely confident. It still takes a wee mental jump to hit tricky obstacles, but the built up confidence carries me over them.

    Premier Icon GolfChick
    Free Member

    Really top point about just because they’ve been ridden before doesn’t mean it was ridden well or correctly. Rode caddon bank with someone recently who has never done it before and they did all three drops without even looking at them first. Immediately I felt substandard as I’ve never done them, however, the person recorded themselves and I watched it later. Their technique was awful and they pretty much nose dived each and every one, I felt better because I know it’s only a matter of time until they have a crash and they’re survivng on having a bigger mental void than me.

    However, I’ve had two nasty OTB’s just last week and still nursing a busted finger and definitely feeling the ‘lost my mojo’ vibe. I’m trying to just get out with people who enjoy riding for ridings sake and doing that myself as well on rides, singing and looking round rather than racing myself. I know it’ll come back again so taking the pressure off myself that it needs to be an instant bounce back. That feature will be there in a few months when my mojo back and in the grand scale of things I’ve nothing to prove to anyone.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    I used to have a ride (when I lived back at Hebden) that had 5-6 pretty robust features through-out the ride, I would only be happy if I cleaned all of them…TBH I was setting myself up for disappointment every time I rode, because something “always” happens; the ground’s wet and slidey, you’re not feeling it, the stars haven’t aligned…and TBH it made me ride all the features in a really nervous way, and I was constantly thinking about them as soon as I set out. But here’s the thing; you’re the only person that cares about this. No one is judging you, it doesn’t effect anything else, you’ve not lost all the ability to ride this stuff, it’s literally just in your head.

    My feeling it, doesn’t beat yourself up, you know how to ride them, and you will, and it’ll be fine, and you’ll wonder what all the fuss was about, but just chill. the features aren’t going away, just keep giving it a go.

    Premier Icon OwenP
    Full Member

    Maybe you’ve nothing left to prove.

    I can assure you that is not the case!

    It’s an interesting point, though.

    Why do you ride? Is hitting these features really important to that? Riding changes over time for most people, might be you’d just enjoy doing something else more than making yourself do these particular features? What’s the goal here, to be able to do them again even if you are shitting yourself each time you do? To progress through them, to do bigger ones so you can dread those too?

    That’s deliberately a bit mean, I know. There’s definitely a good point in seeking out challenge and progressing, but this doesn’t sound fun, more like you are solely judging yourself as a rider on a yes/no to these particular features.

    So Option 1 for me – come back to it if you want to, but no need to stress about it if that’s making your bike time less fun.

    Premier Icon Blackflag
    Full Member

    I’ve had this numerous times after a significant off. There are two bits of advice i’d offer:

    Find similar but smaller features. Session them over and over. Build back up etc.

    Ride with a group / club. You will soon find your place in the pecking order and identify similar skill levels in others. This is really helpful in that you can take confidence that if “Dave” does it and he’s as good as you, you will be OK. Plus they will give you a little metaphorical push when needed.

    Premier Icon brads
    Free Member

    @Golfchick

    Those drops on Caddon bank can be a pig.especially the third and fourth ones.
    Lots of potential for lots of hurt if you just fling yourself off them.

    At least if your wheelset survives them you know that the rest of the trail will have them trashed by the time you get to the bottom 🙂

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Lost count of the number of times I’ve done this on features I’ve been worried about and suddenly realised ‘crap, too late to pull out now, best commit properly’.
    And I’m not sure it’s ever ended badly.

    Hmmm… the last time I did that I went OTB and tore a knee ligament.

    Premier Icon spannermonkey
    Full Member

    @dannyh

    I had enforced time off two wheels for almost 2 years due to injuries (torn rotator x3 and cervical discectomy x2), and then once I was able to look at getting properley back on ‘it’ this year, I found that I seemed to have also misplaced my bottle.

    Best thing I did was book some 1:1 coaching back in May (MarmaldeMTB @ Stanmer Park) as it really helped me with my confidence. Also surprising how many bad habits had also crept in….

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    One of the best tips i can give as well is to make sure you don’t watch Friday Fails before heading out and doing any features, or riding at all!

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

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