Logpiletrackworld give me some simple log store ideas/designs

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  • Logpiletrackworld give me some simple log store ideas/designs
  • Premier Icon richmars
    Subscriber


    One of my basic stores.
    Just bash some stakes into the ground, long branches screwed to the stakes, cheap tarp, something to keep the good stuff off the ground.

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    As McTimber has posted, I’ve tried two different styles.

    One is a “pole barn” style – four posts glued to the ground by whatever means suits your land and then purlins and rafters for a lightweight roof


    The other is last week’s creation with post spike foundations and now-you-see-it-now-you-dont featheredgeboard.

    This week I am going to set some pallets along 2/3rds of the sides of the pole barn for this seasons logs because I got bored building retaining walls out of logs last year. Mcmoonter seems to have far more patience than I and makes some of those gorgeous wood stores with log walls.

    stuartie_c
    Member

    On a somewhat more modest scale, if space is limited and you have some pallets for bases:


    DSC04156 by stuartie_c, on Flickr

    An afternoon’s work with a saw, a drill and some screws. Uprights are 2″x2″s. I’ll see if I can dig out some other “construction” pics.

    Premier Icon spandex_bob
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    Pallets you say…..


    IMAG0543 by rob_j_hopkins, on Flickr

    Not half as nice as the ones above, but entirely constructed from pallets, with one for the base and one for the lid, even using the nails reclaimed during the pallet-splitting phase. Only thing I need to buy is a fresh roll of felt for the roof. Whole thing will be moved into position next to its predecessor in the background once I’ve got enough pallets broken up to finish the sides.

    ski
    Member

    Here are some simple ones I made, designed to be folded flat once empty, so not to take up space, they use a cut pallet to keep the wood off the floor.

    Sold a few too ๐Ÿ˜‰

    teasel
    Member

    They’re excellent, Ski. Functional AND attractive as garden furniture. Simple to knock-up, too, I’m guessing.

    Good stuff…

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    they’re ace, Ski.

    Are the sides cross braced?

    ski
    Member

    Yea, simple to make, hinges at one end and a simple chain and latch to set the height at the other end ๐Ÿ˜‰

    kevj
    Member

    Is that a drain pipe cowl at the top? Nice detail.

    ski
    Member

    Yes the sides are braced.

    ski
    Member

    Yep, drain pipe, screwed to just the one side, so they can fold up.

    My cats use them as launch pads into the neighbors garden too ๐Ÿ˜‰

    globalti
    Member

    This log store is in a very windy place so the wood dries well.

    Pallets for a base and simple braced frames made from old 4×2 that came out of a partition, roof covered in tarred paper. I added the verticals later when my stacker Mrs Gti proved incapable of building a decent stacked corner:

    Premier Icon Simwit
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    These are mine, sized to suit the wall space available & built from some sawn, pressure treated planks with a few old slate tiles as a roof.

    tang
    Member

    Ski, those are a brilliant idea. You have a flat pack product right there that would sell loads.

    samuri
    Member

    I notice everyone’s log store is outside, is this to allow the logs to dry out?

    Our new house currently has all the logs stored in the huge brick man shed but the current owner said as they dried out they created loads of condensation. Now my plan was a) only buy dried logs, and b) move the logs to the garage so I could make the man shed into a proper man shed with bikes and beer in it.

    Will this plan fail? There is a normal wooden shed further back which I could use and just have a small amount in the garage/under the stove itself.

    ski
    Member

    tang – Member

    Ski, those are a brilliant idea. You have a flat pack product right there that would sell loads.

    Sold 10 self assembly kits, to a garden center in Germany, the Germans love their wood too ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    a) you will never buy “dry” logs. No matter what the vendor says, they are rarely less than 30% moisture and you really want to be burning closer to 20%.

    b) McMoonter has a telling tale of storing wood in one of his dungeons solid wall alcoves and it’s not a winner.

    samuri
    Member

    Splendid, ta. I’ll either build one similar to what we have pictured here then (the back garden is huge with loads of room for a store) or just use the wooden shed.

    Premier Icon tommid
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    I have a load of wood and a whole lot more to come as I continue to clear the trees in the garden.

    I have a few pallets as a starting point, don’t want to spend a fortune and I only have limited (read as none) wood working skills.

    Pictures more than welcome.

    Premier Icon tomaso
    Subscriber

    Get yerself some pallets and whack’m together :mrgreen:

    mcmoonter
    Member

    Trying to dry wood indoors with no air circulation was a disaster for me.

    Once I shifted it all to the big open shed the spread of the fungus stopped almost immediately.

    With the open side store, even the side that is exposed to the prevailing wind and rain, the wood dries really well.

    If it is at all possible stack it in such a way as you can get access to it from both sides especially if you have a lot of wood. My first shed is a long tunnel. Which means that I have to empty it completely before I can refill it. If its more open rotational storage is possible.

    b r
    Member

    a) you will never buy “dry” logs. No matter what the vendor says, they are rarely less than 30% moisture and you really want to be burning closer to 20%.

    Got to disagree:

    http://www.realfirewood.co.uk/

    They come sub 10% (on the meter), and by the time they’re stacked (airy garage) and spent a day sat under the fire – nearer 5%.

    samuri
    Member

    For me it shouldn’t be a major issue. The house also has central heating but we like the idea of having a wood stove in the living room. (From my original thread on what it should look like we’re pretty much agreed now that a proper wooden floor with a raised stove with shelving either side of the stove is the way forwards).

    Anyway, the gist is we probably don’t need that much wood and the current owners supply (which they’re leaving behind) is already vast.

    tang
    Member

    My Dad built a massive shed for wood up against a south facing stone wall (we were totally wood dependant at home). Both ends open, prevailing wind straight in one end, tin roof that got quite warm in the summer and salvaged widows up high on the south side. The one end you could back a trailer to and he had saw bench, couple of blocks and a tasty collection of axes(chainsaw also, but not for me!). The other end was closer to the house with a paved path so I could barrow wood in all weathers from store to back door. He had some system going with what went where in the drying process, seemed to work! Wood processing in one form or another was a big part of childhood, I even had a stove in my bedroom and from age 9 it was my deal to look after it!

    timber
    Member

    At the very least, just bung it on the pallets with a tarp over the top, at least it will be part way to dry. We have seasoning stacks kept in a similar way, cord wood is stacked and then covered with a tarp or tin sheeting. Starts the process before spiltting into our storage sheds for finishing.
    Seeing the variety of sheds on here, it will also take a long time to build whilst you consider all your design options. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Samuri – Some of our sheds are stone built, including my own at home, but the key thing is that they are sun-trap yards with ventilation (holes) in the sheds which I think is what McM’s wood cave lacked. Tend to leave the door open on the shed at home to further encourage drying.

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    Simwit – I like the slate roof – nice design!

    thegreatape
    Member

    Mine is kept in an 8’x6′ shed, of which the relatively sheltered side (1′ from a hedge) has had half the boards removes, and the other 3 sides have had probably the best part of a thousand holes drilled in them. Gets very very windy here so the wood is drying out fine. Stacked on pallets with a gangway in the middle.

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