Viewing 17 posts - 41 through 57 (of 57 total)
  • Living next to a building site.
  • Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Surely that can’t occur unless the branch’s are encroaching on the carriageway ? Or were they driving on the pavement.

    Premier Icon singletrackmind
    Full Member

    Ok
    Now for some actual helpful advice.
    Professional builders are covered under the loval environmental health office.
    In my area, they can differ, no noise should project beyond the property boundary between 0800 and 1700 monday thru Friday
    Saturday is 0800 thru 1300.
    Sundays and bank holidays is noise at all, so unless they are wallpapering these are the permissions allowed
    Your local eho will have a team member on standby who is able to stop them making a racket if its 0800 on a Sunday

    If you can get them to come out

    Premier Icon navajo77
    Free Member

    I worked a site few years back where one nearby resident complained about orange light atop the forklift being on before eight .. there is always one 🙄

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    ^ Strange how builders and construction companies don’t give a toss about the people they affect.If it was on their families doorstep it would be a different matter of course.
    In a civilised country nobody would be subjected to the greed of others.

    Premier Icon thestabiliser
    Free Member

    Contact the local authority environmental health officer and the principal contractors environmental advisor, ask the eho what mitigations were in the palnning consent and and ask the environmental advisor for a copy of their environmental management plan. If you’re not a smart arse or confrontational I’ll bet they’ll jump through hoops to do what they can. Previously Ive had reversing alarms altered, different plant used/hired in, critical times avoided for deliveries/operations to protect night shift workers, additional sound barriers put in place and people put up in temporary accommodation (in the most extreme emergency works conditions). That said the best practicable option might be just regular communication on when particularly noisy stuff (piling/breaking out/tipper deliveries) happens so you can plan around it. I’ve been an Environmental advisor for nearly twenty years and if you’re prepared to work with them the contractors will almost certainly work with you.

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Thanks stabaliser some sensible advice there.Pity I have to do all the digging and it isnt provided for tenants automatically.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    Pity I have to do all the digging and it isnt provided for tenants automatically.

    It’s pretty awful living next to a building site, but if you want something sorted out, you’ve got to roll up your sleeves and get involved.

    Premier Icon hopkinsgm
    Free Member

    If it’s being done under a new planning permission and it’s adjacent to your house, you should have been notified. If you’re immediately adjacent, you should have had a letter. If it’s a bit further away, you’ll have been expected to have spotted the obscure notice zip-tied to a gate or lamp post. The planning permission in a residential area will usually should cover acceptable site working hours, and times for deliveries.

    Do be aware that getting them to stick rigidly to these times can be a double edged sword. A recent build just up the road from us had a restriction on delivery times as part of the permissions – pretty normal. The neighbour next to the site kicked off early in the job when a delivery turned up a little early. From that point onwards, when deliveries turned up early – as they usually did – the trucks would go to site, get turned away, then park up some distance from the site and wait – usually with the engine running – until the site was allowed to accept the delivery.

    I do feel for you OP, construction work is noisy and dirty and having large scale construction going on nearby doesn’t make for a pleasant environment, but as other shave posted, houses need to be built. And going back to your original post, your housing provider did arrange alternative accommodation for you during the noisiest part of the works.

    As with most things in life, a little flexibility – on both sides – can help make things a little less unpleasant for all concerned.

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    My hopeless housing provider told me the piling work will be finished on the 26th of May.It continues today and next Tuesday!
    Could one of you tell me the email address for the CEO of Engie group?I would like to pass on my kexperiences so far of her Caring Contractors. Thanks for tour replies so far.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    Funny that people don’t like stuff being done, but are happy to reap the rewards from the same stuff having being done previously.

    People in our local community complained about digging up some fields to build houses, whilst at the same time living in houses that were themselves built on dug-up fields relatively recently. So it’s ok for builders to dig up fields for YOUR house, but not for anyone else’s?

    Premier Icon jonm81
    Free Member

    Whilst I have some sympathy for you OP you are beginning to come across as a little entitled.

    Your housing association is responsible for providing you a roof over your head. The fact there is building works near by is not they fault nor concern really. They have put you up in alternative accommodation for the duration of the planned piling but it sounds like the contractors have had issues which have led to an overrun. This is not the housing associations fault and certainly does not constitute them being useless. Neither is it their responsibility to provide you will all the information nor deal with the contractors to ensure the environmental obligations are being met.

    The onus here is entirely on you as the affected resident to find out this information and report any breaches of the contractors environmental permissions (that is if any breaches are actually occurring).

    You have been told how to do this by TheStabiliser and others. All this information will be available through the local planning portal including the contact details for the contractor where you can get in contact with their Environmental Officer.

    Expecting everyone else to sort this for you (including providing you with the CEOs email address) then contacting then CEO directly rather than following the advice provided is not going to get you the response you want.

    There will be some leg work involved to interact with the contractors and ensure the noise is as low as reasonably practicable but there will be noise and sometimes things such as piling will take a day or two longer than planned. Unfortunately that is just life.

    Premier Icon snotrag
    Full Member

    Funny that people don’t like stuff being done, but are happy to reap the rewards from the same stuff having being done previously.

    People in our local community complained about digging up some fields to build houses, whilst at the same time living in houses that were themselves built on dug-up fields relatively recently. So it’s ok for builders to dig up fields for YOUR house, but not for anyone else’s?


    @molgrips
    funny, isnt it.

    I live in a brand new house. Out of the window now, I can see scaffolding, concrete wagons, Electricicans vans etc. And guess what, 6 months ago, they were building my house, and thats what my neighbours 100yrds up the estate were lookin at.

    I remember reading through all the documentation on the planning portal before buying, including all the complaints that read…

    “I understand we need to build more houses. Just dont build them near me”

    Or my personal favourites were the…

    You cant build there, its beautiful countryside

    from someone who lives on the estate built 20 years ago. Which backs onto a flat featureless muddy agricultural brown field used primarily as a dog toilet.

    Closely followed by all the self-righteous type nonsense as also demonstrated here…

    If you’re going to give up in life enough to buy a soulless new build then surely all your senses must be dulled to a point where you don’t notice there things anyway?

    Giving up on life. Right.

    They are people – building houses (safe, efficient, comfortable and practical ones) so that other people (young people, families, the elderly…) can live in them.

    FFS the OP is perfectly entitled to expect a reasonable quality of life whilst building work is being carried out nearby.

    I undertand the OPs concern, as I am going through this exact thing myself currently, including working from home for the past year.

    But I struggle to understand people who think that general building noise, bit of piling, reversing beepers etc during working hours, isnt ‘reasonable’.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    Old houses were new once. And they don’t actually have ‘soul’ or anything like it, they are just empty buildings. A home is made by the people in it, and that is going on inside every new build house right now. We started a family in this new build house, it’s the genesis of the world for my daughters, it’s their sanctuary, their base, their security. My youngest was born in it. So don’t tell me it’s got no soul please thanks.

    I can’t stand snobs.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    On a positive note, we were the first on this street so we were surrounded by building for a fair while. The piling was a bit loud but didn’t go on for that long and once done it was fairly reasonable. As said, the vehicles driving up and down were the loudest part.

    Premier Icon TheLittlestHobo
    Free Member

    Bravo to Molgrips and Snotrag.

    Had to laugh at the troll comments. Saying i needed to put myself in the OP shoes. I have been in the OP shoes for the last 20yrs. Big truck deliveries, early morning starts, dirty roads being cleaned on Friday afternoons etc etc. I can live with it, i am moving to another building site 🙂

    At the end of the day they are working people providing a service which i think is important. I have kids who i want to be able to buy their own house eventually and unless they keep building, i dont see it happening. If it spoils a bit of sleep or ruins someone’s privileged view i dont really care. They have rules in place to work to which are deemed sociable. If not you are quite within your rights to pull them on it. I am a working man who leaves for work each day and when i return they are usually gone. Do the rules now need changed for all the privileged people working from home who dont want to put up with the construction noise?

    Premier Icon DaveyBoyWonder
    Free Member

    If you’re going to give up in life enough to buy a soulless new build then surely all your senses must be dulled to a point where you don’t notice there things anyway?

    Troll or just a tosser?

    Premier Icon idiotdogbrain
    Free Member

    I’m going to turn the question around slightly; OP – what do you actually want as your ideal outcome, and how reasonable do you think that is?

    – Noisy work to only be carried out within permitted hours? Perfectly reasonable, if they’re not abiding by that already.

    – Reduction in noise levels of construction work? Not going to happen, the methods being used will already have been approved by the council.

    – Being moved to alternate accommodation for the entire duration of the works? Not going to happen, in fact I’d say you were lucky to be moved during the piling. If you were a homeowner rather than housing association tenant you wouldn’t have had the choice other than to relocate temporarily at your own expense.

    – Construction to be cancelled entirely? Yeah, no.

Viewing 17 posts - 41 through 57 (of 57 total)

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