Light vs Heavy? When does it make a difference?

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  • Light vs Heavy? When does it make a difference?
  • Premier Icon Chainline
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    I love all these weights being banded about ๐Ÿ™‚ my bike is a 160/160 AM bike, with a Hammerschmidt granted, but offset with light rear cassette and mech no bash chain guard etc. It is built to a bank breaking spec, BUT with components designed to last and perform well in its intended use I.e. Wide wheels for tyre stability, wide bars, tyres that wont pinch flat or slash at the first sight of a sharp alpine rock, and that brick of a component but that makes all the difference a dropper post.
    My frame is 6.5lb as opposed to an epiphany T 5.7. It weighs exactly 32.5lbs, yes I am a weight weenie.

    I also have a light xc 100mm bike with a 5lb frame built with very light components e.g 2011 xX SID forks, xtr, CK, Stans alpine rims, flat carbon bars, etc etc and it comes in at 24lb.

    Many people are surprised when they weigh their bikes on proper scales rather than taking manufacturers figures.

    27lb for a 140mm? Bike is not heavy!! Jeez. Too many magazines boys…

    I have regularly pedalled my very heavy 32.5pm AM bike on 75km a day endure events over 2 to 3 days, 1500-2000m a day climbing (not a typo) without much trouble. Than key as mentioned is to get fit and not carry exces weight on you.

    The other big factor is tyres. using sticky tyres, very useful for going fast, makes a big difference to the effort required to pedal! Similarly very light wheels will make a heavier bike ‘feel’ light.

    Now, go out and ride your bikes ๐Ÿ˜†

    Premier Icon njee20
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    19.7lb FS here, proper weight! Prefer how it rides with the light wheels than the heavy ones, even downhill, which surprised me!

    Premier Icon richmtb
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    19.7lb FS here, proper weight!

    Rule 1

    Premier Icon njee20
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    Rule 1? Obey the rules?

    Many people are surprised when they weigh their bikes on proper scales rather than taking manufacturers figures.

    Spesh claim 30.2lb for the Pitch Pro IIRC.
    I weighed each individual nut and bolt on the kitchen scales, want to guess how far out they were?

    They were bang on!

    ericemel
    Member

    Yeah for sure lower weight is generally better, especially when climbing the 3 flights of stairs to my Flat!

    A huge consideration on feel is where the *low weight* is. Stick some 1200g wheels (pair) on and the handling totally changes.

    I had a 19lb singlespeed rigid a few years ago, the thing was as lively as hell, I also broke it. For me I have settled for a 25lb ss hard tail built with light/durable and it perfect.

    My 16lb SS ti cx bike is the loveliest thing (bike) I have ever ridden. A lot nicer than the 22lb bike is was based on (Specialized Tricross)

    xiphon
    Member

    There was a fad when people put their DH bikes on a diet – this person got their coke can session 88 under 30lbs. ( http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230348 )

    The conclusion was that they were too light – so they piled on the pounds again. 35lb is still considered light for a DH bike.

    I’m of the opinion it’s better to loose the weight from yourself, before you go mental on bike dieting.

    Bikerat
    Member

    I’m using a 22lb FS, great for Hike-a-Bike, sits great on the back of my rucksack, however when gravity takes over things can get a bit twitchy, getting 6lb off the waist is cheaper and easier than 6lb off your favourite bike

    Premier Icon FOG
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    Psychological in my opinion. My HT weighs a lot more than my last HT and I am conviced I go slower on it. Difficult to prove objectively but it certainly makes me want a lighter bike.

    thebunk
    Member

    I’m always surprised by how much heavier my bike is once I’ve attached a full bottle and saddlebag to it. Does a few extra pounds make any difference once I’m on it? Tyres, frame and suspension haven’t changed, so no.

    IMO, you’re mile’s better off spending money/time improving your fitness – not necessarily losing weight, unless you’re lardy.

    messiah
    Member

    A few years ago my FS bike hit 45lbs and my HT was 35lbs… I’d built them up heavy to make sure I didn’t break them, the problem was they were a bastard to cycle anywhere which removed some of the fun. I would only use the FS where I really needed it and often rode the HT where I should have had the FS. Two years ago I replaced them both and my current FS is 33lbs and my HT is 26lbs, and they are much better bikes because it. I can now ride the FS and the HT everywhere, I love my lighter bikes, no going back.

    Premier Icon HansRey
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    my quake is near enough 40lbs. Take on everything from XC jaunts in the Peaks to bikepark days and enduro events in Finland. It climbs well, etc as expected but my god it is knackering towards the end of the ride.

    But it is 32t front. No granny gear so every climb is harder than it needs to be.

    julians
    Member

    My ibis mojo HD 160mm is 29.2 lbs and is generally easier over any distance than the 32lb enduro it replaced, not sure if that is due to the lower weight or a more efficient suspension design or a bit of both.

    PJay
    Member

    I do tend to get a bit confused about what’s right and what’s wrong when it comes to bikes. My large framed, rigid Pipedream R853 Sirius built up with solid, reliable kit(and which spends most of its time on-road) is 27lbs. When the frame was released loads of people went on about how it was too heavy at over 5lbs (although I like it, it’s fun to ride and seems to do everything I want of it).

    Now people seem to be banging on about how great their steel framed ‘fatbikes’ are which must be monstorously heavy, presumably with a significant proportion of that being rotating weight in the rims and tyres. I’d have though they’d be really hard work and sluggish, but apparently they’re great fun. I guess if you’re a racer weight means a great deal,but for me comfort, durability and overall ‘enjoyment factor’ are more important.

    Premier Icon Chainline
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    Now I know Njee s bike is proper weight ๐Ÿ™‚ it takes a lot of cash to get to that level and I suspect he’d agree that he wouldn’t rag it down an alpine rock garden.

    I do think there is a tipping point which for me was when the AM hit 34lbs I really noticed the difference uphill. Almost as much as when I replaced my rear tyre from a High roller to a Larson..
    Most ‘red’ trails at trail centres aren’t going to trouble modern mountain bike components but take it to the lakes/Scotland/alps or start taking on drop offs and jumps regularly and lightweight takes second place to robust.

    Premier Icon Chainline
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    ..says he currently in the process of building a 120mm Nicolai below 21lbs including a reverb dropper ๐Ÿ˜€ but it ain’t cheap and when the going gets steep out comes the big hitter….Winch and plummet ๐Ÿ˜†

    Premier Icon Chainline
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    Pjay, fat bikes gather a lot of momentum. They do take a bit of winding up but once going are hard to deviate! The tyres also act a bit like 80mm of undamped travel, which can feel like a mahoosive hoot, until it gets very rocky anyway, then it does get a bit bouncy.

    I did Trans Provence on my Rigid but Fat front Jones (31.5lb) last year and the very rocky parts were, errr, challenging! See the videos and pictures here…now that had Saint components on it for that race, nowt broke, quite a few other bikes did, including carbon loveliness…there was a bit of climbing too iirc

    PJay
    Member

    Pjay, fat bikes gather a lot of momentum. They do take a bit of winding up but once going are hard to deviate!

    And sometimes these are some of the ‘faults’ people level at ‘heavy’ mountain bike where flickability and lots of speed and direction changes might be necessary. Like I said, I’m often confused about what’s ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in the world of bikes, so I probably just don’t bother. I enjoy what I’ve got and that’s the main thing. I personally think that the weight thing is overdone a bit (unless you’re a racer I guess) and if it works for you that’s what matters.

Viewing 18 posts - 41 through 58 (of 58 total)

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