Let's talk tumble dryers

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  • Let's talk tumble dryers
  • Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    Having had two condenser dryers, I would side with your wife and have a vented one. IME condenser chucked a *lot* of water vapour in the house.
    Get a proper ventilation hole in wall.
    Ours is a gumtree special, £30 for a year old Hotpoint thing that’s now done 5 years for us.

    mudmuncher
    Member

    Been looking into this too.

    There is also a heat pump type which although are more expensive use 1/2 the amount of energy.

    snap
    Member

    Ok …so the wife wants a new tumble dryer and I’ve been told to sort it
    I haven’t got a clue what I’m looking at but she did say it has to have a flue that goes out the window
    Any recommendations good or bad would be appreciated

    Thanks in advance

    Premier Icon Davesport
    Subscriber

    Miele condenser here. No detectable rise in humidity in a fairly compact utility room. The cats do however like to hot air outlet 😀

    Premier Icon woody74
    Subscriber

    Got a Beko Condensor dryer and no humidity in the room at all. However, it is a A+ model that is meant to use less electricity but it takes hours to dry a load. I think it uses less electricity per hour as it doesn’t get as hot, but takes loads longer to dry. So, all in all, it uses the same amount of electricity. Basically, it is cheating to get around the Energy labelling.

    Greybeard
    Member

    Had a vented one for 20 years, when it died we replaced it with a Bosch heat pump condenser one. Our electricity use has dropped significantly, and we’ve saved something like £600 or £700 in less than 4 years. It doesn’t put out any moisture into the room, it all goes into the drawer, which is pulled out and emptied into the sink at the end of each load – I look at the amount of water and think “We used to evaporate all that! No wonder it’s cheaper to run”.

    It also means it can go anywhere, not be near the window/wall vent. An added bonus is that because it’s drying the air that contacts the clothes, not just heating it, they don’t get so hot.

    johndoh
    Member

    I hadn’t even considered condenser driers in the past (always assumed they were a higher purchase cost but more convenient alternative to a vented one.

    Given our household’s reliance on a drier (two young kids)can anyone point me in the direction of some running cost calculations so I can see if it would be worth making the swap.

    DT78
    Member

    have a heat pump Samsung really pleased with it, even plays a nice little ditty when you switch it on and it finishes. if you go into John Lewis they have cost to run info on each appliciance so you can compare easily. Other stores may do the same

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    There is also a heat pump type which although are more expensive use 1/2 the amount of energy.

    We have a Beko heat pump one. I did the sums when we bought it and given that we had young kids (hence a lot of washing) and we tumble dry a lot of stuff, the initial cost easily paid for itself within a year or two.

    It still produces a little moisture as condensers always do, though not nearly as bad as some I’ve seen. And I plumbed it in so we don’t have to keep emptying the water out.

    retro83
    Member

    Greybeard – Member
    Had a vented one for 20 years, when it died we replaced it with a Bosch heat pump condenser one. Our electricity use has dropped significantly, and we’ve saved something like £600 or £700 in less than 4 years. It doesn’t put out any moisture into the room, it all goes into the drawer, which is pulled out and emptied into the sink at the end of each load – I look at the amount of water and think “We used to evaporate all that! No wonder it’s cheaper to run”.

    It also means it can go anywhere, not be near the window/wall vent. An added bonus is that because it’s drying the air that contacts the clothes, not just heating it, they don’t get so hot.

    Does it get the clothes completely dry (as opposed to slightly damp)? We were put off by a lot of reviews saying Bosch heatpump ones wouldn’t completely dry the items. You never know if the people who post the reviews are dimwits who have used the wrong setting though.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    Got a Miele heatpump one here – easy access to the fluff filters and water container, I’m happy with it.

    wzzzz
    Member

    We got a Bosch condenser,

    This one:
    http://www.appliancecity.co.uk/bosch/washing-machines-and-dryers/wtb86590gb/product-20638/

    Paid £500 not long ago….was £600 so £400 is a bargain.

    Anyway unexpectedly its more efficient than the old cheap vented dryer it replaced.

    It works because it recovers the heat rather than just pumping heat to an outside vent.

    I got it because we rearranged the small kitchen and the dryer had to go under the stairs so no chance of a vent pipe.

    No extra moisture noticed so far. It does give off some heat. I think condenser dryers used to be crap, but not any more for a decent one.

    If you have a drain handy (downstairs loo? sink?) you can plumb the condensate into that, so no emptying drawers of water, although its no bother really.

    Premier Icon on and on
    Subscriber

    We have a Siemens and its crap.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    I think this is the updated version of the heatpump Beko we have:


    http://ao.com/product/dph8756w-beko-condenser-tumble-dryer-white-41760-18.aspx

    £469, 8kg capacity, A+++ energy rating (giving, according to AO, annual consumption of 176 Kwh = £27.10), includes plumbing option kit, easy access to filters (which is important as they really need to be kept clear on all tumble driers)

    johndoh
    Member

    So for example – that condenser Beko ay A+++, how would that compare (running costs wise) against my current vented Hotpoint which is B rated.

    http://ao.com/product/tvfm70bgp-hotpoint-aquarius-vented-tumble-dryer-white-29929-19.aspx

    ????

    Miele heat pump, plumbed in.

    Very little heat or moisture into the room that I can detect.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    that condenser Beko ay A+++, how would that compare (running costs wise) against my current vented Hotpoint which is B rated.

    AO give energy consumption figures for comparison. Click on the “How Well Does it Perform?” link. That Hotpoint says

    Annual Energy Consumption: 510 Kwh
    Annual Energy Cost Based On 15.40p/Unit: £78.54

    Obviously what it actually costs you depends how much you use it, but it is useful as a relative comparison.

    You can also hit the “Add to Compare” button to get a side-by-side comaprison of multiple machines that includes those energy figures.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Oh and other things to note johndoh, the Beko has a 8kg capacity vs 7kg on the Hotpoint, so potentially less loads which would also lower the total running costs.

    And the Beko does “Sensor Drying” (i.e. adjusting the time left on the cycle based on how much moisture it detects) which might also lower the running costs as you avoid over-drying clothes.

    It’s a tangled web. 😀

    T1000
    Member

    Consider a gas tumble dryer v efficient option

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Subscriber

    I have a bosch heat pump dryer. Its fantastic. Plumbed in the drain for the condensation and as there is no vent to the outside world from the drum get no vapour in our utility (there’s a vent on the front that just leads to the heat exchanger).

    Its shed loads more efficient than a traditional dryer & still manage to make money from our PV when its running.

    You need to fiddle with the fine program settings during initial running as the humidistat is a little over-optimistic.

    Premier Icon H1ghland3r
    Subscriber

    Had the same request from the Mrs last year after our condenser died. I didn’t fancy having to pay for someone to come and put a vent in the utility room wall (it’s 3′ thick!!) so I did some research and got a Bosch heatpump one. It’s been a revelation to be honest. There’s a slight draft that comes out of the front vent when it’s running and the air that comes out is cooler and drier than the air that goes in. It can dry an 8kg load of towels in less than 2 hours, a full load of clothes in close to an hour and based on efficiency figures, should cast around £60 a year to run.
    I would say though that it’s worth plumbing in the drain though, as emptying the drawer after every other load is a pain unless you have a sink right next to it.. in which case plumbing it in and never having to worry about it should be easy enough.
    I also found that the one we had didn’t have the free space that you usually get at the back for plumbing it was a solid 60×60 box.. had to rejig some of the plumbing behind it to get it to fit. Worth it though.

    #EDIT: Meant to say also, I have a hygrometer outside the utility room and within a couple of weeks of fitting the new drier, the humidity had dropped from high 60% to mid-high 50%..

    johndoh
    Member

    You can also hit the “Add to Compare” button to get a side-by-side comaprison of multiple machines that includes those energy figures.

    Ahh yes – of course I have no idea how much we use ours but it is *LOTS* (my wife has a pretty strong phobia about spiders so is very hesitant to dry anything outside). Is there a way of working out how much power (on average) we use running one each month (we don’t yet have a smart meter fitted).

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Is there a way of working out how much power (on average) we use running one each month (we don’t yet have a smart meter fitted).

    http://www.p3international.com/products/p4400.html

    Or one of the many (UK plug) clones out there should do the job I think.

    Of course just doing it monthly can be a bit misleading, even if you never line dry outside, as you presumably wear more clothes in winter.

    johndoh
    Member

    I assume when I get the smart meter fitten (next month) that will tell me anyway (as it should show actual current usage when the drier is switched on)?

    Greybeard
    Member

    Does it get the clothes completely dry (as opposed to slightly damp)? We were put off by a lot of reviews saying Bosch heatpump ones wouldn’t completely dry the items.

    When we first got it, it did sometimes seem to leave them slightly damp, but it rarely happens now. It has a timed cycle as alternative to the sensor, so if they are damp you can put it back on for a bit longer.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    I assume when I get the smart meter fitten (next month) that will tell me anyway (as it should show actual current usage when the drier is switched on)?

    I don’t think most smart meters give you per-appliance readings, so unless it is a fancy one your per cycle power usage could be knocked off by things like the freezer kicking in or the oven being on.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Agree with Greybeard – the clothes sometimes come out ever so slightly damp on our Beko (I’m guessing it is a relative humidity thing). But easy enough to stick them in for another ten minutes on timer.

    johndoh
    Member

    I don’t think most smart meters give you per-appliance readings, so unless it is a fancy one your per cycle power usage could be knocked off by things like the freezer kicking in or the oven being on.

    No I don’t expect that but if I look at usage when the drier is switched on and off I could work it out?

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    I think a Kill-a-Watt would be a lot easier, but yeah. Bear in mind it’ll use different amounts of power at different points in the cycle (i.e. more when the heater and motor are both running).

    johndoh
    Member

    But at £35 a Kill A Watt is a bit expensive in itself for a one off test too!

    twinw4ll
    Member

    We’ve just replaced a Bosch which was a total pile of s**** with a White Knight, cheap as chips, works brilliantly and is British made.
    According to the net they’re also the most reliable and won’t burn your house to the ground.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    According to the net they’re also the most reliable and won’t burn your house to the ground.

    ALL tumble driers are fire risks!
    Tumble dryers are the second biggest cause of house fires.

    http://www.ukwhitegoods.co.uk/appliance-industry-news/84-whiteknight/3587-white-knight-recall-tumble-dryers-due-to-fire-risk

    http://www.which.co.uk/news/2012/12/1800-white-knight-tumble-dryers-could-catch-fire-304455/


    Burnt out White Knight C372WV – https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3504579/dryer-fire-burns-down-flat/

    Premier Icon tomd
    Subscriber

    We bought a vented Bosch second hand and it does a good job of drying clothes and has not burnt the house down. I keep ours in the garage and have a long vent hose which gets dropped out the window when needed. IMO no need to drill massive hole through the wall for something that gets used once a week on average. Obviously if you have quintuplets or run a BnB it might be worth getting the venting fitted properly.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    no need to drill massive hole through the wall for something that gets used once a week on average

    Once a week?? Our drier probably gets used at least 5 times a week. Often more.

    Premier Icon tomd
    Subscriber

    Yep pretty much, we really just use it for towels / sheets etc. Good clothes and all the bike stuff doesn’t go in it. We live in a dry-ish part of the country so good old washing line gets used for half the year.

    We could just be dirty as some folk seem to wash everything all the time. There have been some good threads on here over the years about washing bike kit and jeans. It varied between “full boil wash after 20 min wearage followed by nappysan and UV treatment” to “I just buy merino and wash it when it become crusty”.

    TheDTs
    Member

    +1 on the gas option.
    Very keen to get ours fitted again.
    i bought a cheap second hand electric and it is nowhere as good or efficient as the gas one we had in the old house.

    prezet
    Member

    Are Miele really worth the extra money? I’m trying to decide between the following:

    Beko
    Bosch
    Miele

    Premier Icon benp1
    Subscriber

    We have a washer/dryer (I’m aware that jack of all trades is master of none)

    We don’t have the right space to have two units (not without losing valuable storage anyway) but why do folks use a dryer rather than just a normal airer?

    Maybe I’m just being tight

    johndoh
    Member

    but why do folks use a dryer rather than just a normal airer?

    We use one because we have a young family – if we naturally aired everything there wouldn’t be a spare space in the house and it would be continually damp.

    Before we had kids we barely ever used our washer/dryer as a dryer but now we have separates and they are both used daily, sometimes several times a day.

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