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  • Leaking shower and damp patch woes – advice please
  • Premier Icon Aus
    Free Member

    OK, so need help here … not my shower so access etc is trickyish but …

    There’s a wee bit of damp leaking from the shower cubicle and causing damp in the floor grouting. From an inspection, the sealant around the door frame looks like it’s peeled away, plus dodgy sealant around the base of the tray/screen.

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2kEgRx5]20210223_092453[/url] by aus23, on Flickr

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2kEgiCH]20210223_092514[/url] by aus23, on Flickr

    So to resolve, do I:
    1) dig out all the base/tray sealant, dry and reseal
    2) remove the screen door frame, clean, refit and seal or, will removing the door frame cause more aggro, so just clean/remove sealant as best as poss and re-seal

    And then in his bedroom, there’s a damp, crumbly patch. Been in the loft above this point (ceiling-wall) and it seems dry and dusty, no obvious water ingress. 6 months ago, he said it was mouldy in the same area, so he removed the plaster and there’s an air cavity behind. He filled the 2″ x 6″ hole with cement, polyfilla on top and painted. Any reason that this has caused this odd bubbling?

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2kEgiBF]20210223_093448[/url] by aus23, on Flickr

    Cheers

    Premier Icon goldfish24
    Free Member

    Yes remove all silicone and start again. Variety of methods available, a sealant dissolver chemical really helps.
    No need to remove door, but do need to get everything clean and dry before siliconing
    Finally, apply the silicone in the right places. That’s been done wrong previously, should not be silicone on the inside of screen, this has caused a water trap probably leading to the state it’s in now.

    Premier Icon FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    Blimey – first of all your bathroom hygiene is awful !

    How long has that damp patch been on the wall downstairs? – If its been a while be careful about joists being wet and rotten. We had a shower that was leaking behind the wall and the joist were rotten after 5 yrs of leaking, and all needed to be replaced.

    IMO you need to take everything out and allow to dry properly. A lot of that will then crumble to nothing. Thats not a straight forward job as you have left it too long to resolve.

    Premier Icon 5plusn8
    Free Member

    That’s been done wrong previously, should not be silicone on the inside of screen, this has caused a water trap probably leading to the state it’s in now.

    This is the counter intuitive important bit that even some of the most experienced tradesmen still ignore.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    I suspect some serious rot around that shower. IMO silicone sealant is not enough. there are various seal systems for doing this that are a lot better

    Premier Icon Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    I do a LOT of bathroom refits, and this issue is what cause the whole job to be done in 90% of cases.

    The tray is probably fitted incorrectly, the silicone done badly and the door fitted incorrectly.

    The correct way should be –

    – Tray butted against the wall (not wall timbers) ,boarded all the way down (not onto the tray).
    – It should then have a generous silicone sealant between tray and wall.
    – After this tiling or wall covering, then silicone sealant again.
    – After that the enclosure can be fitted with silicone to OUTSIDE only, to allow any moisture to run back into the tray.

    You’ll probably need to have the enclosure off, repair any wall boards/timber damage, re-seal everything then refit the enclosure as above.

    Premier Icon Aus
    Free Member

    Thanks all …
    – not my bathroom/house!
    – the damp patch on the wall is in a bedroom, not near the bathroom so unrelated. It struck me as curious as it’s 1/4 along the ceiling/wall join, the roof above is pitched so an odd water ingress. No other damp/mould at all in the bedroom/house. Just wondered if the previous repair was done to quickly e.g. the cement didn’t dry out before polyfilla/paint hence that sort of finish?
    – I’ve suggested to have a bathroom fitter in to refit the shower etc but he’s he’s been let down and can’t get anyone to do the work (expect it’s not a fun/profitable job for a pro), no parking nearby to the house etc

    Any recos for sealant dissolver? Guess I can have a go to try and help … if that fails, find a professional…

    Premier Icon supremebean
    Free Member

    I have been fitting bathrooms for 26 years. Blazing-saddles is correct, although he missed the first step out which is to bed the tray down. Not stick/glue or silicon down, bedded on mortar, as per tray instructions. Any of these steps missed out will result in a failed install and is just a matter of time before it shows.

    What’s this ‘various seal systems’ that are a lot better?

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Free Member

    What’s this ‘various seal systems’ that are a lot better?

    Indeed, I am intrigued…

    Premier Icon dooosuk
    Free Member
    Premier Icon supremebean
    Free Member

    That’s for diy’ers and poor tradesmen. A good install doesn’t require these fancy seals. If water gets through to the point where it hits that seal, the same thing is going to happen as above. The water will just make its way along that secondary seal and exit the corners. No point in having all these fancy seals, trays and tanking etc if the most important finishing sealant is done wrong, or if other steps of the install have been done wrong. If all steps of the install are done in the correct manner, there is no chance of leaks.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    MY shower / bath has IIRC 3 parts to the seal. Its tanked, it has a secondary seal ( more sophisticated than that one) and it has silicone. Anyone who relied just on silicone is a bodger in my view

    The other key thing of course is the tray needs to be supported and secured properly otherwise it will move and the seals break

    If all steps of the install are done in the correct manner, there is no chance of leaks.

    this

    Premier Icon Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    Blazing-saddles is correct, although he missed the first step out which is to bed the tray down. Not stick/glue or silicon down, bedded on mortar, as per tray instructions

    I’d actually taken that as a given, but good point. I pull a good few up that are siliconed down or expanding foam, as some plumbers think you’re trying to glue them down, rather than make them stable and solid.

    As for the sticky edge seal, it’s crap and I don’t consider it required or even a good thing, a properly boarded and tanked wall with the tray siliconed properly doesn’t need this.

    Premier Icon chickenman
    Full Member

    I always put a blob of silicon between the tray and the tiles/shower board where the screen wall profiles sit. Water will get inside the channel and run down there and you can’t seal it after the screen is in.

    Premier Icon Blazin-saddles
    Free Member

    The tray should be fully sealed to the wall before the screen goes anywhere near it and most screen instructions call for fully sealed external with all fixing holes to be sealed also, should be no need to put it anywhere else.

    Premier Icon supremebean
    Free Member

    I’d actually taken that as a given, but good point. I pull a good few up that are siliconed down or expanding foam, as some plumbers think you’re trying to glue them down, rather than make them stable and solid.

    As for the sticky edge seal, it’s crap and I don’t consider it required or even a good thing, a properly boarded and tanked wall with the tray siliconed properly doesn’t need this.

    I agree 👍

    The first time i watched a video from that skill builder guy above he laid a tray and it was cracked the next day when he came back to the job. There was quite a few comments below the video saying “should have used CT1”, “just silicon it down”.🤣

    Premier Icon wobbliscott
    Full Member

    The chances are it’s what’s happening under the surface you need to worry about. Got our shower done last year. Some evidence of minor seepage, not leakage but sealing and mouldy silicone sealant. Re-grouted re-sealed several times and when the builders removed the tiles from the wall the whole plasterboard came off with the tiles revealing this:-

    Dry rot. Shower had been seeping for years. Luckily we caught it just in time before it spread to any structural beams so just a case of ripping out the stud wall and replacing, but pretty nasty.

    Might be worth trying to see what’s going on behind the wall if you can.

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