LBS customer of the day part 657

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  • LBS customer of the day part 657
  • jekkyl
    Member

    So, tube in bin, new tube in the wheel, that’s how I fix punctures

    that’s your choice but incredibly wasteful. Where do you live? if it’s close I’ll have every single tube off you.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    Jekkyl, my LBS charges a tenner. I raised an eyebrow and he explained they always put a new tube in case the patch fails and we get into the op scenario. He also indexes the gears because of the number of times folk would blame his puncture repair for the fact that their gearshifting is every bit as bad as it was when they brought it in.

    Edric 64
    Member

    epicyclo ,I like your style !!

    Edric 64
    Member

    I always put a new tube in when I worked in a shop .I dont know a shop that doesnt .Its quicker than fixing a tube and they cant bring it back saying the patch failed

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Subscriber

    my LBS charges a tenner.

    Evans do a £5 puncture repair. If you buy a tube from them and the tube is £5. 😉

    £10 seems about the normal price to be honest (tube + fitting) although I know some shops that charge extra for hub geared bikes which are a bit more complicated.

    As above, I’ve never come across a shop that doesn’t just chuck a new tube in – far quicker and easier that way.

    Saccades
    Member

    jekkyl – Member

    So, tube in bin, new tube in the wheel, that’s how I fix punctures

    that’s your choice but incredibly wasteful. Where do you live? if it’s close I’ll have every single tube off you.

    I’ve found on 23c’s that I’ve probably got a 20% failure rate on repairs – I struggle to get the patch properly attached on the narrow rubber so I’ve started to just swop out.

    On the mtb when I had tubes I would do a swop out so i wasn’t holding anyone up, but repair at my leisure once back home. Did swop some massively patched tubes with the SSMM kenda guy back in 06? i think.

    edlong
    Member

    Not specifically about punctures, but that analogy someone posted about cars is kinda interesting (I think).

    In my parents’ generation, say the 1950s, 1960s, if you had a car and expected to be able to use it, you had to be able to do basic maintenance on it, everyone could open the bonnet and had at least a rudimentary understanding of what the different bits were, what they did and what needed to be done to deal with common faults. Some of it was what we’d now call “urban legend” (or “total ballhooks”) such as cracking eggs into radiators and tights as emergency fanbelts, but at least people generally understood what a cracked radiator or broken fanbelt was..

    At some point in maybe the 1980s cars started being generally reliable and people stopped gaining the knowledge about the oily bits. Shortly afterwards it all went computery and now, even if you know what the things do, there’s not that much the average home mechanic can do under the bonnet of a car anyway. Perhaps as a result of this, it seems that it is now acceptable to call the AA / RAC out if you get a flat in the car, and I know people who have done this, despite being perfectly capable of changing a wheel themselves – we just don’t have an oily rag relationship with our cars anymore like what we used to.

    Another example is computers – in the 1980s, if you’d shown someone a modern PC, and they saw that you could just turn it on and press the icons on screen and install peripherals by simply plugging in a USB cable, and the thing just works, they’d have been gobsmacked. Anyone remember trying to install, say, a modem, or even a printer back in the day? Again, the “plug and play” technology has changed our relationship with the machine – we don’t expect to understand how the thing works or to spend half a day playing with DIP switches and disabling ports, and nor would we be able to, in many cases. You used to have to “know about computers” to get them to do things, now you just have to switch them on.

    So, on to bikes.. Are we heading in the same direction? I can see it happening. I’m no great mechanic, but I can adjust the brakes on my kids bikes. However, the hydraulic system on my bike is a bit beyond me. Sure, I could learn and keep up with things, but my brakes don’t need regular attention, they just work, so if they do need a bleed, I’ll pop round to Garage Bikes and Al or one of his spannerists will do the job and charge me not much for doing it. I can index my own gears, but how about in a few years time when we’re all on electronic gear shifting? Won’t it be like cars, you’ll expect that it has to go into the shop as it isn’t really a home servicing task? Shock servicing?

    The point is (and there is one, honestly, and here it comes with any luck) that once you establish that routine maintenance tasks are something that you go to the bike shop for rather than something you do at home and get a bit oily, that will become the normal route, and even the basic stuff that you could do will become a bike shop task, just like I don’t “tinker” with my Mondeo, it goes straight to the garage.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    Good point edlong. I used to service my own bikes , but they were simple two-strokes, and then onto various bits of Guzzi agricultural stuff etc etc. I stopped servicing my own when I bought a ZXR with more complicated carburetters etc etc.

    However, I gotta pull you up on hydraulics. They are only “complicated” as long as they remain a mystery. The actual principal is extraordinarily simple, and the reality is only limited by your ability to puzzle out how pulling on the lever forces the pads onto the rotor. There aren’t all that many moving parts:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydraulic_disc_brake_diagram.gif

    There is a whiff of snakeoil around servo wave and other enhancements, but that’s just a cammed lever to take up the slack quickly for example.

    I felt the same way about suspension forks, until I’d serviced a couple. I’m no expert, but they aren’t intimidating anymore.

    sugdenr
    Member

    I helped a ‘mate’ gete his lad who was dead keen started in MTBing, found him a good bike in the classifieds for over half a grand, took him out a few times, bit of bike upgrade and repair for him. Then I stopped because ‘mate’ turned out to be ‘lazy user of friends’…..and I gather the lads bike has been unused for 1.5yrs now due to a puncture which neither could be arsed to fix.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Ooh OP has been beaten!

    Customer jumps queue at 5:45 telling me he’s in a hurry and has something set aside.

    I say “I can serve you as long as it’s quick as I need to leave shortly to make the chain-gang”. I go get it.

    Just as I am about to complete the transaction he says “Oh can you price match on CRC?”

    “Yes” (though it’s actually YOU that’s meant to do the work here :roll) ). I load up the website.

    (after a few minutes)…”Oh I can’t see it on the website. I need to go, can I leave it for another night? I need to leave to get to the chain-gang”

    He then leaves for the chain-gang, having wasted 5 minutes of my time, and making ME miss the chain gang.

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