Labs as trail hounds?

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  • Labs as trail hounds?
  • kristoff
    Member

    there we go a lean chocolate lab πŸ™‚

    i personally prefer the look of the leaner working line labrador to the overbuilt show breeding line.

    Lawmanmx
    Member

    Some great doggies above for sure πŸ™‚
    Only me with a Patterdale then?

    grim168
    Member

    we have a choocy lab. Judging by previous pics is from working stock. He was a nine month old rescue. He weighs in at 29kg and is often mistaken for a pup even though he is nearly three. Only problem was wearing his pads out once at Gisburn 8O. It was only when he limped on his evening walk that I realised a problem. Felt terrible but am carefull now not to go too fast. Go too slow and he buggers off into the woods. I started on canal tow path to get him used to bike.

    grim168
    Member

    thats scooby

    This is Charlie , a lab springer x . I am hoping she will make a good trail hound but she is only 4 months so its a bit early yet . I have been riding round the garden with her to get her use to it .

    Premier Icon Bushwacked
    Subscriber

    Really want a dog now…

    new years plan is to get our new dog into riding with us πŸ™‚

    he’s a pointer cross and is happiest when running or chasing pheasant.

    plan is to introduce him to the bikes by riding round the park gently with him on a lead and lots of treats for him keeping close and build up from there…. dont quite trust him along the trails yet as chances are a good scent will be more exciting that keeping up with us!

    any tips for getting your dog riding with you?

    heihei
    Member

    Bushwacked….you considered a German Short-haired Pointer (GSP)? We adopted a 2yr old at the start of this year who has turned out to be a perfect trail hound. Done a few 25 milers with her at a fast pace, and she laps it up. Smart enough to know what’s going on – she usually runs ahead, esp on trails she knows, but will pull over if she thinks you are faster (not often). Regularly night-ride with her, and she’s happy with other riders around too.
    They need more excercise than a lab (ours gets an hour a day min) but will be pretty chilled out afterwards.

    Lawmanmx
    Member

    To get yer dog running at your side, show him/her a treat it loves then hold your hand to its nose then start to ride off slowly, the dog will follow the treat, keep telling the dog how well its doing then reward the dog and repeat (so it knows whats expected of it, then name the task)
    Best tip will always be to reward with treats! Chopped cooked liver works with my little’un, but saying that she’e picked Everything ive taught her within a couple of minutes, so i recon its all down to the dog in the end.
    Like i said, i cant reccomend Patterdales highly enough.
    And most important with any dog, train them to come to you when you call them (for a treat) i always have a bag of liver in my pocket and she knows it πŸ™‚

    MrNero50
    Member

    Phil – just take them out with you on a quiet trail. Took our 1 year old Cocker out on Xmas eve round Grizedale, he just knew to run along. Yes there were a few near misses but not bad for a first effort. Soon got that “go on” meant speed up to get out the way. Just try it.

    Premier Icon variflex
    Subscriber

    We’ve got a 3 year old yellow lab with long legs @ 47kg weight but trim.

    Although he’s ok at keeping up with wife on her runs (she competes alot on long distance trail running), after about 5miles he starts to suffer and Im sure its because of the body weight vs long legs. Not convinced all labs are good trail dogs compared to says spaniels or collies.

    I’d say a trim short legged lab would be better as a trail dog compared with longer legged labs.

    Definitely worth talking to a vet.

    Inbred456
    Member

    Think about what labs are bred to do. Flush out game from dense scrub, retrieve game and swim etc. They are not bred to run any distance at a sustained pace. That’s not to say they won’t run all day with a bike but what problems are you storing up for a later date when the dog is older. I love it when people say they love running with the bike, I’ve never seen a dog yet that wouldn’t chase after it’s owner on a bike. I bet they would prefer you walking with them for a couple of hours through some nice woodland or over the moors. Get a dog that’s bred for running, that’s light on its feet, a pointer, vizla or a collie if you want to take them with a bike.

    Lawmanmx
    Member

    Wise words inbred πŸ™‚

    elzorillo
    Member

    My choc lab is almost the build of a rottweiler.. the golden is a bit shorter.. neither can jump into the back of my truck without help, let alone run anywhere!

    😳

    carlphillips
    Member

    what inbred says, also worth noting that some labs (unsure of other breeds) can be susceptible to epilepsy, some fits (like the ones my lab suffers from) can be brought on by strenuous sustained exercise.

    not the best trail dogs really. mine is restricted to swimming and long walks now, cannot ride/run with him at all.
    edit mine is show stock chunky choccy lab

    picking up one of the bikes from a friends house (been in storage whilst having family over for christmas to make space in the kitchen) this evening to start the dog/bike experiment πŸ˜†

    if he’s not pulling me up hills by sunday then i’m taking him back to the rescue and demanding a new dog.

    deviant
    Member

    Sometimes take my Jack Russell x Patterdale on rides, from being a puppy he knew to follow as that’s what comes naturally to a young dog…I have a female one too but she’s mental and runs out front constantly looking back….amusing but can result in her taking a wrong turn, she thinks she’s leading the ride I reckon.

    Some if the nicest rides I had this summer we’re just pootling along with her out front and him behind, dogs are great.

    walleater
    Member

    LOL at philconsequence. I don’t know the percentage of luck and training is but Ashka is a pretty good trail dog already. She’s around 12 months old now but had her first taste at running with a bike when maybe only around 3 months old ( just slowly along a quiet path). She initially went insane with loads of barking and ankle mouthing but soon calmed down with some guidance from me. She’s been mountain biking with me quite a bit, but the trails over here tend to be techy and slow so no sustained high speed running. I’m looking forward to letting her rip when she’s a few months older.
    Being a rescue from Arctic Canada, she’s born to run, and the hardest part has been getting her to sit and wait for me to start riding but she’s finally figured it out. I don’t want her running ahead of me.

    Here’s a recent cheesy video of her in action πŸ˜€

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jc_RYs6W9gI[/video]

    well we tried a bit of riding on the way back in the rain this evening, he was great πŸ™‚ even helped pull me up a hill so i guess i’ll let him stay a little longer.

    absolutely fine with me being on the bike, not bothered at all, didn’t need any treats, no biting or barking, just running nicely along side me on the lead πŸ˜€ going to take him for a longer ride on sunday and vary the speed a lot more, might even dare to attempt turning left.

    hooray for doggies

    Premier Icon funkrodent
    Subscriber

    Whilst I can see that some labs will be better than others, as has already been pointed out, they’re not a breed that was designed for long hours of continuous running. Not 100% convinced re collies either – sure they need exercise, but they also need a lot of training and mental stimulation and again theyre not really designed to go on and on. If you want a dog that was bred to run and run then a Dalmatian would be a good bet. They were bred as carriage dogs, running behind coaches in the 18th and 19th centuries. Failing that a husky? Or indeed any of the terrier breeds (I’ve seen a few jack Russells out and about)

    Lawmanmx
    Member

    I saw a lovely Lab at Llandegla today, great trail manners but unfortunately it was suffering on its feet even with trail booties on, the trail was in bad conditions today though, poor thing.

    Premier Icon Bushwacked
    Subscriber

    Just found this while searching about

    Running Dogs

    tim1709
    Member

    as collies have been suggested,our border collie has a serious amount of endurance and is probably the ideal trail machine.
    he loves going with the bike and could do it day in and day out,far further and faster than i could.

    ours is bred from two working trials champions and has the perfect build for long sustained work,his diet also plays a big part in energy levels etc, he may be far more suited than a lab and definatly a trail blazer but one thing to consider whatever you decide is your life when your not on your bike as a dog like ours is a huge commitment and requires alot of time, a few runs a week with a bike wouldnt even scratch the surface.

    Premier Icon mattbee
    Subscriber

    Springer/Lab cross here too. Gret mix, enthusiastic, energetic and pleasant temprament. Loves running with the bike. gets really excited when he sees me get my riding kit out!

Viewing 24 posts - 41 through 64 (of 64 total)

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