Viewing 32 posts - 1 through 32 (of 32 total)
  • “Keeping honest people honest” lock.
  • Kramer
    Free Member

    Further to the where to keep your bike when credit card touring thread what is the collective’s experience with lightweight “keep honest people honest” type locks that are easily carried, but robust enough to stop people just walking away with your bike when it’s in a relatively safe place?

    I’ve got a dead cheap cable lock that is designed for skis outside a restaurant at lunchtime that I use on trains. It wouldn’t put up more than a minute or twos resistance to a determined attack, but it’s enough to stop opportunists from wheeling it off the train before I notice.

    I’d quite like something a bit more robust though, but still more portable than the d-locks and chains that I used to use around London. Any suggestions please?

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    I use a cafe lock but it’s definitely a keep the bike in sight/stop the opportunist thief from walking past and wheeling your bike away kind of thing so interested in anyone’s recommendations for something different. Realising any lock can be defeated if given enough time. Locks are just so the thief will choose easier pickings in this scenario

    Kramer
    Free Member

    @rOcKeTdOg which cafe lock do you use?

    fettlin
    Full Member

    Hiplok Spin. Been using one for ages,  round town and at work,  might be a bit bigger than you need but it’s so convenient it’s not worth using anything smaller, YMMV.

    sboardman
    Full Member

    I’ve got one of these which aren’t light but not that heavy. I do a lot of solo road riding so this actually gives me a bit of confidence if I have to leave it out of sight or even making a trip to the toilet less anxious.

    Kramer
    Free Member

    Both nice choices.

    Thinking about it, one of my use cases is going to be when I get the sleeper train in France, so I think I’d prefer something with a key than a combination.

    roger_mellie
    Full Member

    Kryptonite cable and a combination padlock.

    davy90
    Free Member

    I have a Hiplock Z lock combination lock which I use for cafe stops. I need to wear my specs to read the numbers and it managed to change one of the numbers on its own rattling around in the top tube bag which could have been entertaining. It moved one wheel one digit which took a bit of faffing to work out.

    I’ve so far not managed to reset it.. which reminds me…

    ransos
    Free Member

    I also use a Hiplock z lock. I suspect a cable cutter would be through it in a few seconds, but as above, it stops an opportunist riding off. I would only use overnight if the bike was in a locked room.

    jameso
    Full Member

    I have a tiny Abus padlock, Ti-Al named something or other, and a small, thin Kryptonite 2-loop cable. I larksfoot it around the seat stay and wrap it there to carry it on the bike. Very light and adaptable. It would resist more than a snowboard lock for similar weight and simple cable snips might struggle with it but it’s not for leaving the bike out of sight for long. Fine for supplies stops in non-dodgy areas when touring, that sort of thing.

    nealc
    Free Member

    A kryptonite seat saver cable and an abus titalium . Is the bikepacker approved lightest lock.

    jameso
    Full Member

    titalium

    That’s the one..

    nealc
    Free Member

    Beaten to it by a single second!!!!

    Garry_Lager
    Full Member

    You can get some pretty compact D-locks that will take your bike out of contention for most of the losers who steal bikes. Portability is good because they’re small and not too weighty – the drawback is more they’re not that versatile when it comes to the actual locking. Basically need a fixed, accessible, narrow, cylindrical object. You can usually find one, esp in an urban area, but if you can’t you’re stuck.

    charlie.farley
    Full Member

    If 2kg is not too heavy for your preference Kryptonite Evolution Chain Lock after watching this YouTube video

    Heavy enough that I feel secure using it, flexible enough to work in most situations, and fits easily on multiple locations on a bike frame, whereas mentioned above mini D locks have their limitations

    I have the 55cm one which is compact and flexible, and they come in longer lengths, perhaps 90cm

    defblade
    Free Member

    OnGuard Terrier Combination for my very portable honesty lock – it’s just a bit chunkier than most cheap cable locks tho I have no illusions about it withstanding any tools at all. Mostly goes out with my road bike.

    And

    Foldylock for more serious times, mostly goes out with my commuter/shopping bike, but does go on my road bike if I know it’ll be left for a while.

    MTB is never out of sight, and there’s no shops or cafes in the woods around here!

    binners
    Full Member

    You can get some pretty compact D-locks that will take your bike out of contention for most of the losers who steal bikes

    I recently got Binnerette number 2 a Kryptonite Mini 7 D-Lock with cable so she can lock her bike up outside the gym. On offer at less than 40 quid on Wiggle at the moment

    She’s still in possession of her (quite nice) bike and the gym is in Stretford, so it looks like its a suitable deterrent

    It does seem a nice happy medium. Small and light and compact enough to shove in her gym backpack and sturdy enough to put an opportunist thief off

    bigblackshed
    Full Member

    I’ve got two Hiplok Z locks for cafe stops. If I’m round town with multiple stops then I use a Kryptonite D lock, I’ve got a belt holster from Restrap that makes carrying it dead simple. But D locks are heavy and very limiting without an additional cable loop.

    Edit: As pictured by binners ^^^^^^^

    masterdabber
    Free Member

    On a slightly different tack… what do people use to lock their bikes to towbar type bike racks. My rack has a basic lock of the bit that clamps to the frame but it’s very basic.  I’m mindful that anything too heavy or unprotected is going to get joggles around a lot when driving and might cause damage.

    jimdubleyou
    Full Member

    I’ve got one of these for popping in the shop on an audax or event – a smidge more robust than a snowboard lock type thing but not much more volume.

    https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/accessorieslocks/safeman-compact-pocket-cable-lock/

    Kramer
    Free Member

    I’ve already got a couple of D Locks of varying levels of security, also a fairly heavy duty chain with a disc type abus lock. I was sort of wondering if there was a sweet spot above something that could be got through with wire cutters, but not as heavy as the chain.

    Looking here I guess not.

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    @rOcKeTdOg which cafe lock do you use?


    @kramer
    a strap lock combi 10

    Squire Straplok 10, Combi 10 and Retrac Max review

    JoB
    Free Member

    to keep with the theme, a Kryptonite motorbike disc lock (a teeny tiny D-lock) because i’ve had it lying around for years and a Kryptonite Seatsaver cable

    i didn’t know about the ABUS Titalium and now i’m very desirous of one 🙂

    gray
    Full Member

    I have an Ottolock:

    https://www.ottodesignworks.com/shop/p/hexband

    Pretty light. Bit of a fiddly mechanism. Definitely wouldn’t stop a determined thief with decent tools but would at least be more of a pain in the arse to get through than the flimsiest cable lock.

    For bikepacking I also use a very loud motion sensitive alarm.

    Northwind
    Full Member

    If you go cable, make it a lightweight convenient one with a lightweight convenient lock, because no cables offer any more than trivial protection and there’s no sense inconveniencing yourself any more than the absolute minimum. Get above the really skinny ones that you can cut with kitchen scissors but after that they’re all functionally identical.

    I really like the foldy ones but they can be awkward sometimes, especially when there’s no proper bike lock and you’re improvising. Same with a small d-lock, they’re either great or they don’t work at all. I got a hiplock chain lock recently for pub/shops use and it’s a brilliant balance for that but a bit heavy and bulky for anything more i think.

    It’s basically pretty difficult to hit that balance of usefulness, actual meaningful security, and convenience, definitely not going to be the same for everyone.

    benp1
    Full Member

    I prefer the retractable combination cable locks. Easy to use, small, convenient, and no keys to remember

    I have two. One for pub stops and bikepacking, another for locking my brompton on the train. Only used to stop opportunists

    tjagain
    Full Member

    I have a decent cable and padlock combo – weighs 700 g compared to 2.5 kg for me good lock

    The cable is thick enough to need more than a pair of snips or pliers to break but obviously no good against a bolt cutter

    I put the cable round as many things and bits of the bike as possible and lock it to the chainring with the padlock thru the chainring so even cutting the cable the bike cannot be ridden away

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    what do people use to lock their bikes to towbar type bike racks

    D Lock and long cable through everything. And don’t let bikes out of sight in most places when on the rack.

    intheborders
    Free Member

    Thinking about it, one of my use cases is going to be when I get the sleeper train in France, so I think I’d prefer something with a key than a combination.

    Because someone has all night to try all the combinations?

    I’ve a couple of Hiplok Z combinations but wouldn’t want to trust them other than using them to secure my bike to something while I’m stood in a queue in a shop or sat in a cafe when too horrible to sit outside.  They’re very visable though, and light and compact.

    Kramer
    Free Member

    and lock it to the chainring with the padlock thru the chainring so even cutting the cable the bike cannot be ridden away

    Sneaky. I approve.

    Kramer
    Free Member

    Because someone has all night to try all the combinations?

    Yeah. If they wanted to.

    fatface1
    Free Member

    I’ve got an old choker chain from a small dog with a small padlock you get for luggage. Ideally chained to something solid. It’s not being pulled apart. It’ll stop someone grabbing it outside a cafe and running off.

    Echoing something already mentioned: a small padlock through a disc (like a motorbike disc lock).

    The chunky zip ties will hold your bike solidly to something and weigh next to nothing. It’ll stop your bike being dragged off. You can ‘unlock’ them with something pointy on a multitool. Even the quick release, multi-use ones will work to stop a grab and dash. They are fiddly to undo and you’d notice someone standing over your bike looking dodgy.

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