Just bought a new laptop that comes with Windows 8.

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  • Just bought a new laptop that comes with Windows 8.
  • cfinnimore
    Member

    My dad’s just off the phone trying to get me to help him work his shiny new “windows 8”.

    I’m Googling how to revert the theme back to Vista, or earlier.

    samuri
    Member

    You might have missed windows 7 which is actually pretty good.

    There are many guides on the Internet that help you make windows 8 look like windows 7.
    Do them.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    Yea verily, for it is he who decreed that Windows 8 is good.

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvsboPUjrGc[/video]

    Check out the Independent today. All even numbered windows releases are crap.

    Premier Icon kennyp
    Subscriber

    Okay, just had a quick google and I see there are indeed various sites about converting back to 7. Ay recommendations for a safe and reliable one? Ta.

    avdave2
    Member

    I’ve just bought a new laptop and actually had the option to go with 7 but thought no I’ll try 8 even though I’m sure I’ll hate it and end up going back to 7. Rather to my surprise I’ve found it better than expected and currently don’t have any plans to revert.

    cfinnimore
    Member

    revert, revert, revert. etc.

    I don’t know what this PC came with, I made it look like XP immediately.

    Edit: In fact, as close to ’98 as possible. Custom coloured toolbars the lot.

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Subscriber

    Using Windows 7 here. It’s the best OS Microsoft have done IMO.

    cfinnimore
    Member

    I had DOS open the other day, to open a .txt file, just to reminisce.

    Mr_C
    Member

    Start8 is what you need to make Windows 8 useable.

    I have just spent the best part of three hours trying to install Windows 7 on a windows 8 laptop. PITA. 👿

    Premier Icon jimmy
    Subscriber

    I believe MS are hot on the case of making Windows 8 a bit more, well, Windows-like. So says my well-informed SO.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Subscriber

    Could be you tech luddites just need to spend a little time getting used to it (and learning the touchpad shortcuts etc) instead of banging your rocks together and whinging about how it’s not what it used to be.

    It’s not actually half bad at all after the learning curve, and speed wise it’s much better than 7.

    cfinnimore
    Member

    I ‘ve had to use a Mac for the past 2 months at work.

    I can’t work it. Intuitive my arse.

    Someone said on the twitterer the other day “Windows 8, the new NT”

    Ie:cack.

    29erKeith
    Member

    Or wait a little bit for windows Blue aka windows 8.1 aka oh shit we’ve done another Vista, oh sod it lets bring the start button and desktop mode back because a hell of a lot of people are hating this shit!

    Metro on a phone yes
    Metro on a tablet yes
    Desktop/laptop IMHO no!

    samuri
    Member

    Lol at flaperon.

    Didn’t you know? Everyone on stw works in the it industry.
    We’re all experts and trust us, windows 8 is crap.

    Premier Icon stimpy
    Subscriber

    I dislike waiting for the Start screen to load, then clicking the program I want and being dumped into the dekstop which I then also have to wait for while it also loads.

    And my PC hangs roughly every half hour for 5 mins each time while Windows laughably ‘updates’ itself (which it inevitably then fails to do).

    And I even bothered to learn the shortcuts. But I still hate it. Much preferred my Win 7 installation which ran quicker and was MUCH more stable.

    Hate Windows 8. Unstable, unusable piece of cack.

    [/rant]

    lemonysam
    Member

    I quite like it to be honest. Like seven but with a massive, easier to use, easier to customise start menu.

    SamB
    Member

    Eight is fine once you get used to the bigger Start menu. Not had any problem with stability so far and it’s nice and zippy on my SSD laptop.

    Would be even better with a touchscreen but mouse and the windows key works just fine for now 8)

    mrmo
    Member

    biggest improvement i made with the SO’s laptop was turning off the track pad gestures, Trying to copy Apple and failing miserably!!!!

    Premier Icon kennyp
    Subscriber

    And what a pile of complete and utter crud Windows 8 is. Seriously. It is so badly thought out it’s like it’s been done as a joke. Windows XP was pretty straightforward and intuitive but this new thing is nonsense. Someone at Microsoft wants taking out and shot.

    This isn’t a question or anything like that, just a rant.

    IanMunro
    Member

    Tim Cook, chief executive of Apple, said Windows 8 would be like combining a toaster and a fridge – something that, while technically possible, was “probably not going to be pleasing to the user”.

    😀

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/330c8b8e-b66b-11e2-93ba-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2ShUXABPh

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    Windows 7 on our lappy is ace, Windows 8 on work lappy is OK, but as above I disabled the trackpad gestures to help… It takes time, but it is growing on me.

    pipnet1
    Member

    I tried the Windows8 release client for a while before it was released. I didn’t find it too bad to be honest. I can see how it would work very well on tablets/touch screen PCs/phones etc. but for anyone who does more than basic tasks (web browsing etc) it just seems to get in the way on a ‘normal’ PC. I’ll be sticking with windows7 for the foreseeable future.

    Mind if you want something really horrible to use, try Ubuntu’s head-up-display system.

    Premier Icon jimmers
    Subscriber

    I’ve got Windows 8 on my works laptop. It’s ok but can be frustrating at times.

    The Mrs needed a new laptop to as old one is a bit slow (10years old) considered getting a cheap Win 8 laptop but thought better of it. In the end I bought a second hand MacBook Pro as that is more straight forward to use.

    For the IT bods try using Windows Server 2012 via remote desktop. It has the same UI layout as Win 8. I had to Google how to find out where Internet Explorer is and how to log out. Using the charm action is difficult in a VM window and you can’t use the Windows Start key. Downgraded the server to Windows Sever 2008.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I was at a tech day at Microsoft central a little while ago to look at Windows Server 2012. Didn’t see the Metro interface once all day. Seems even the MS techs disable it.

    What’s with all the fuss about missing a start button. You now have a massive, full screen sized start button. It really is not that hard to figure out. But then, judging by all the grief here, perhaps it is.

    Agree with a couple of points ^^ that perhaps the “metro” style apps are not such a great experience on a desktop / laptop vs a touch screen tablet or phone but overall it’s reasonably responsive (at least as quick as 7) and I have found getting used to the Start screen doesn’t take very long.

    And Cougar, I suspect it is because Server 2012 does not boot into the Start screen that you may not have seen much of it at the tech day. Starts up with the desktop and Server Manager.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Seems I learned a lot. (-: I really should take a proper look at it at some point.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I’m amazed at how many people don’t seem to be capable of understanding this. It really is so simple, at least it was when I tried it.

    The icons are just bigger, and they are all across the screen instead of in the bottom right. Scary, I know.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Never under estimate the resistance to change in any work force would appear to be the lesson of this thread!

    Edukator
    Member

    Persist with it. The more I use it the more I like it. At first it was like trying to cook in someone else’s kitchen but now I’ve found everything I realise that the layout works rather well.

    lodious
    Member

    The icons are just bigger, and they are all across the screen instead of in the bottom right. Scary, I know.

    It’s wouldn’t be scary, if this were true….but I don’t think it is. For example, the Skype app that runs on the start screen does not have all the functionality (and forces you to use a MS account) of the proper Skype app which runs on the desktop, so you need two separate apps. Internet explorer run from the start menu looks and behaves differently to the IE installed on the traditional desktop. The settings appear to be done in two places, there is the old style control panel and a new settings app under the metro start screen, but this can only be used for a subset of what you use the old control panel for.

    I’ve only played with it for an hour or so, but to me it does not seem like it’s properly integrated into the OS, it’s just a bolt on, but at the same time, it’s taken away some of the useful functions in Win 7.

    Best case, MS have been very poor at getting across to users how to get started with Win 8. I like the look of the Metro interface, but it looks like they have only done half a job in integrating it with the OS.

    Premier Icon richmars
    Subscriber

    The main thing that sent me back to Windows 7 was the lack of POP3 support in the email program that comes with Windows 8. I know there are work arounds, but why should I?

    Premier Icon Nick
    Subscriber

    @Richmars – Probably easier to do the work around than regress, surely?

    I got a cheap copy (£10) through work and upgraded my 5 year old Vista desktop with it, no more crashing, much faster, but I did install Classic Shell.

    Only thing that doesn’t work so far is the crappy Garmin USB to Serial cable so it looks like I’ll be upgrading from my old Garmin Etrex H.

    Edukator
    Member

    Given the Outlook/Mail habit of automatically binning important mail I didn’t even try the mail program. Thunderbird is free and works. Once installed you get a nice little icon on the start page (as with everything else you install).

    boblo
    Member

    molgrips – Member
    I’m amazed at how many people don’t seem to be capable of understanding this. It really is so simple

    This sounds like Microsoft. The real question is ‘why’? There’s a decades old convention that individuals and corporations have bought in to. Millions of hours of training and productivity have been invested in this. It’s a bit like changing the accepted conventions of the dash layout of a car just to appear fresh and funky.

    There’s resistance because it’s change to a fundamental work tool for most of us. If it were ‘that simple’, there wouldn’t be such a kerfuffle would there?

    I still don’t ‘get’ the changes to ribbon menus in Office with no option for a ‘classic’ view. Same sort of thing, buggeration for buggerations sake.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    The main thing that sent me back to Windows 7 was the lack of POP3 support in the email program that comes with Windows 8. I know there are work arounds, but why should I?

    I find that curious, given that Windows 7 doesn’t come with an email program at all.

    Given the Outlook/Mail habit of automatically binning important mail I didn’t even try the mail program.

    Again, I’ve used “Live Mail” since it was Internet Mail and News, and I’ve never had that happen to me.

    Premier Icon leffeboy
    Subscriber

    I still don’t ‘get’ the changes to ribbon menus in Office with no option for a ‘classic’ view. Same sort of thing, buggeration for buggerations sake

    I was exactly like you until I bothered to go through the tutorials that they provide. Now I find it much much better as everything has been moved into much more logical places or is hidden when I don’t need it which makes finding other stuff easier. As has been said already you need to invest a bit of time in learning but it is really worth the effort, you can get stuff done way faster

    Edukator
    Member

    When I learned to drive I had to learn hand signals, some cars had the indicators on the dash in the middle, the radio was a long stretch and required turning a knob to find a channel, the dip switch was foot operated, the start button was on the floor, you had to get out of the car to adjust the wing mirror, the speedo was better placed for the passenger… . I’m happy they’ve improved the dash layout on cars and I’m happy with the new opening screen of W8.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    The ‘old’ design of Office, wasn’t scalable, I think might be the problem. I’ve seen power users (ie, people who actually vaguely know how to use it) with so many toolbars displayed that their workspace is reduced to a postcard at the bottom of the screen.

    Whilst the ribbon might not necessarily be ideal (I really don’t understand MS’s fascination with ever-bigger icons for a start), it’s a definite improvement on pre-2007 editions.

    boblo
    Member

    Trouble is, if you use win 8, Excel, Word, Access, PowerPoint, Visio, Project and Outlook, that’s a lot of productive time spent ‘making the effort’ whilst continuing to deliver the ‘real work’ already committed to.

    Ribbons etc are great for mouse jockeys and occasional users, less so for those who’ve committed their experience to muscle memory.

    I’m starting to sound like a luddite so I’m off to burn some witches for heresy 🙂

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    The real question is ‘why’?

    Well that is a good question. MS are faced with competition from Apple, so they need to respond. If they just stood still the world would be thinking of MS as the boring plain workaday option and Apple as the lovely luxury item. They don’t want to be thought of this way.

    W8 is a much bigger step than simply rearranging the start menu and taskbar. The front screen can be quite powerful with those tiles displaying content.

    I really do agree though that the metro front end shoul dhave been an option, or maybe even like an app, and that when you switch to desktop mode the start menu should be there. That way if you just open up your machine for a quick social network browse or catch up on something, metro makes it easy; but if you sit down to work you can do it in productivity mode.

    They are actually two different styles of use, MS should perhaps recognise this. They COULD produce two OSes in fact, work and lifestyle say, or they could make it easy to switch between modes. Or.. they could sell a work version without the metro stuff.

    OR, even better still, a work version of Metro. So your sysadmins could configure your start screen for you to provide all the work stuff you want with your apps displaying useful info in those tiles set up for your particular job.. hmm..

    sharkbait
    Member

    Still using XP here at work (can’t see any point in changing) and Macs at home, but very much enjoying learning Python and working with this on the Raspberry Pi 🙂


    pi
    Currently encoding a video made from timelapse images taken last night by the Pi.

    MS are faced with competition from Apple, so they need to respond

    Been using Windows 8 on a desktop for about two months now. I find the whole user interface so awkward that I’m actually contemplating getting an iMAC instead!

    Ho hum
    Member

    My new laptop that I bought a month ago has Windows 8 on it and it replaced my old one with XP and I could not get on with the metro interface and charms thing, so I downloaded one of those start button apps and things are much better.

    One positive about Windows 8 is the speed with which it boots up and closes down in comparison to XP.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Yes, each new version of Windows gets much better technically, aside from the user interface.

Viewing 45 posts - 1 through 45 (of 72 total)

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