Job question for the IT lot

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  • Job question for the IT lot
  • Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    Starting from scratch is pretty hard. Try and get a first line job somewhere on low end money and work your way up.

    Most places will recruit people into those roles based on personality as no one really has any professional qualifications.

    You will be up against people with IT A Levels and maybe degrees. You could always take evening classes to get a basic qualification or two under your belt?

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    get some experience or qualifications
    Do you konw C++?
    SQL?
    Java?
    C#?
    How would you virtualize a server setup?
    How would you back up a corporate data drive?

    ocrider
    Member

    Try asking in the GTAV thread, cos they’re all pulling a sickie today!

    I personally value experience over qualifications – someone who is good at learning new stuff, with good problem solving skills who is able to demonstrate both is probably more important than a string of qualifications which rapidly go out of date anyway.

    As above, start in a first line / helpdesk role – volunteer for everything and work up from there.

    If you wanted to learn stuff whilst keeping your current job then what about looking to see if any community / voluntary organisations in your area want some assistance with their IT.

    I’m thinking community IT training schemes, youth centres and tech recycling schemes.

    Or are there opportunities to get more involved in the IT where you work currently?

    Lots of opportunities to learn stuff off your own bat too – it’s easy enough to learn the basic principles of virtualization using free software like Xen…same for SQL with MySQL and the like.

    chvck
    Member

    What sort of stuff would you actually want to get into? IT jobs covers a pretty damn big area!

    As someone mentioned above, I got into IT via working on an internal helpdesk for a bank. Gave me a grounding on the basics of a lot of stuff. Did that for 2 years and then got recruited into a ‘proper’ technical team where I learnt the ins and outs of one of the industry leading software deployment tools. Then jumped (a sinking) ship taking in a promotion on the way to another bank and then jumped again to a slightly different role which I’ve been in for 3 years and really enjoying it.

    Unless you’ve got some kind of degree then entrance via helpdesk type role is where you should be focusing your attention.

    Premier Icon gofasterstripes
    Subscriber

    mikewsmith – Member
    get some experience or qualifications
    Do you konw C++?
    SQL?
    Java?
    C#?
    How would you virtualize a server setup?
    How would you back up a corporate data drive?

    1-English, do you speak it?
    2-Blues Brothers 2000?
    3- – got heatrburn now
    4-Tell the boss he’s got a server and keep the money. Run it on Amazon Cloud for a month and hope his attention moves before the minimum contract runs out
    5-With tape, in 2013, A HAHAHAHAHAHA. My sides.

    Premier Icon xherbivorex
    Subscriber

    what everyone else said really; I bluffed my way into a first line helpdesk role with IBM 13 years ago and just made sure I got involved with any and every technical project/issue that came our way, then a year or so later got promoted up to a 2nd line role. At the time I had O level Computer Studies but no other related qualifications, just a background in customer service type environments.

    richc
    Member

    what ^ said.

    apply for a first line support job, highlight in your CV enjoying working with people, good communications skills and problem solving including examples.

    then work your way up the food chain.

    5-With tape, in 2013, A HAHAHAHAHAHA. My sides.

    Not sure if you are implying that no one uses tapes anymore ……?

    clubber
    Member

    Basically been working in outdoor shops since I graduated with a geography degree

    How long is that? If not too long then IMO the best thing would be to get on a graduate program as you’ll find progression quicker and you’ll typically get less menial/more interesting work.

    Otherwise, you’ll be up against proper geeks who’ve probably built the Gibson at home and already know about servers, etc – eg you’re going to be poor in comparison on skills. As suggested above, that means you’d need to work right from the bottom – first line support where there are usually scripts to follow rather than having to actually have the answers and it’s a good way to get a foot in the door. The pay is crap though and it’s often quite dull. If you are personable and efficient though, you will quickly stand out and it’ll allow you to develop a career in IT.

    tonyd
    Member

    This

    Unless you’ve got some kind of [IT related] degree then entrance via helpdesk type role is where you should be focusing your attention.

    or preferably this

    get on a graduate program

    If you do go in at the ground floor with a front line helpdesk job it’ll no doubt involve shifts and nights. Don’t spend nightshifts watching pron, youtube, or action movies. Use them as an opportunity to learn what 2nd line do.

    Premier Icon chrisdw
    Subscriber

    Okay so I was wondering the best way to look for jobs in IT. Then I remembered about this place and you lot!
    Basically been working in outdoor shops since I graduated with a geography degree. Not had much luck with job hunting, hence still working in a shop.

    Been thinking about IT jobs as I am normally pretty competent with computer related things. And quite enjoy the hardware side of things. But have no official training or courses.

    What’s the best way into the line of work for an ‘outsider’?
    I appreciate it will just be office work, but I’ve done about as much retail work as I can handle.

    Premier Icon gofasterstripes
    Subscriber

    No no, tape’s still in use, I know. Just makes me chuckle, that’s all.

    benslow
    Member

    Where do you live ?

    Premier Icon mmannerr
    Subscriber

    Just try to sneak into any large IT corporation, if you are barking psychopath with basic Powerpoint skills and enjoy wearing a suit you’ll be a manager or director in a year.

    (+15 years in the industry myself and some things never change…)

    mark90
    Member

    Use them as an opportunity to learn what 2nd line do

    Pass tickets from 1st line to 3rd line 🙄

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Subscriber

    You want this exact job here.

    Working for a university is an ideal introduction to the world of IT. You’ll encounter all sorts of systems, platforms, hardware and “characters”. I loved working in this environment: myself and a few of my former colleagues always say that we’ll retire back to a univeristy. In no other IT position could the senior operators get away with firstly rendering the entire university mail system inoperable thanks to a botched patch and then clearing off at 5pm with a shrug of the shoulders and a “we’ll fix it tomorrow”!

    The best thing though is training: universities are fanatical about investing in their workforce and will nurture the promising and talented in a way that no other employer would ever consider. On top of that the holiday allowance is stunning: 27 days + bank holidays + all of Christmas as “customary days”.

    Hanging around 11000 students can be fun too!

    Oh and don’t be put of by the “Desirable section in the job posting, it’s on there to make them look like they know what they’re doing.

    xiphon
    Member

    Like many on here, I started at the bottom – 1st line helpdesk support.

    Without a degree (or any industry qualifications) its pretty much the only way to get in – unless you know of a job going (and an employee recommends your skills – despite lack of professional experience – to their boss).

    Consider joining the BCS (as an associate member) and join in with things going on – it opens up a whole world of IT professionals…

    Most importantly – do you see IT/tech as a hobby/interest, or just a career you fancy ‘cos it sounds interesting?

    (Been in IT for about 9 years now, currently responsible for the infrastructure of a multi-million pound engineering company…)

    andysandes
    Member

    Or if you don’t want to get into the techy side, apply for a graduate scheme in a business change or IT department doing something like a business analyst role or project management. They will train you up and give you real life experience and the pay will likely be better than front line support role.

    I did Geography at uni and now manage IT and Business change projects.

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