Job-Life changes

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  • Job-Life changes
  • Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Been seriously considering dumping the cosy, secure, financially rewarding, but ultimately soul destroying IT world. Something to do with turning 45 and not seeing how I’ll be able to survive this crap for another 20 years! How serious I’ll turn out to be, is maybe another matter, but can anyone offer any advice, preferably those that have actually done it (ie. changed their life by changing their job).
    Someone posted a Forestry job working at Coed-y-Brenin, that sort of thing would be perfect, but without the experience required, would I even be considered?
    Where else to look for these types of jobs?

    Premier Icon jimmy
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    Currently doing the same, from IT into Environmental stuff. Spoke to a few people first but wouldn’t get a look in without quals / experience so doing an MSc but more vocational courses would probably hit the spot.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Thanks jimmy, will look into that. Was beginning to think I’d gone a little deep for today’s STW mood πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon darrell
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    i did 15 years ago…..from accountancy to university for 6 years and a Ph.D in geology – never looked back. I was broke for quite some time though.

    0303062650
    Member

    DezB,

    I ‘quit’ IT a few years ago after having one of those moments of clarity you speak of, and had to dabble again just to make sure the bills were being paid, but, life outside of IT is fantastic, I went to site this morning, had a meeting with a chap about a website and some other design work, stopped and had lunch at home, got a long day on friday, but life is excellent (despite needing a new car and not really being able to justify it this side of spring)

    My thoughts would be to set a plan, work out what you want to do, work out what financial details you need sorting, then go and take a wee in the bosses office-plant (while he’s asking while you’re leaving…)

    OK, you dont have to do the last bit … but … still… the recession is a good thing, there are training courses galore, funding, business mentoring all being thrown at you.

    Go and do it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Oh, and while you don’t need me to say it, but i will! πŸ˜‰ “you can teach a skill, you can’t teach the right attitude” so bearing that in mind, are your skills so desperately needed?

    good luck bud and do not listen to the nay-sayers!

    Jonathan πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Cheers Jonathan, nice one.

    (boss is female, might just take a leak in one of her diet shakes) 😈

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
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    Not to the same degree, but I had a fairly successful career in my 20s, lost my job in a takeover, and basically faced two options – either continue with my insurance career, which would have involved getting a job in London and commuting half my life, or doing something else and having a work/life balance where we could afford to start and raise a family.

    We went the latter route – relocated to take advantage of house prices and minimise the mortgage, and I’ve more or less drifted through a variety of jobs for the last 10 years, part of which was spent doing a part time degree. Have a great work/life balance with our young family, just enough money to live on and dabble with bikes. Yes, more money and a more repsonsible position would be nice, but I’ve no regrets.

    Currently tempted by the idea of a rights of way officer role, but need some practical experience to land one so maybe when the kids are both at school and MrsSwadey can get back to part-time work I might take another pay cut and look into that option.

    The Beard
    Member

    I’d love to make a change – but i’m too chicken and have too many debts from university first time round to consider doing it all again. If I lose my job (which in the current climate is a distinct possibility) then I think I’ll have a good long think about what I’m doing.

    Premier Icon Nick
    Subscriber

    Brother in law jacked in his job in TV (art direction/set design) because he was fed up with working with w@nkers. Did a foresty course then spent a couple of years skint doing voluntary work for whoever would take him (sitting watching Osprey Nests all night near Bassenthwaite etc) and has now landed a job with the RSPB, loves it, still a bit skint, works on one of their reserves and can be giving a tour to some kids one day, dry stone walling the next, painting a mural showing the seasons the other, nice. Me, I love working in IT, wouldn’t change it for the world, no sireee ehem…

    Dudie
    Member

    I’m 38 next month and the month after, I am jacking in my cosy ‘job’ (actually director of an online car parts retailer, that I and a colleague set up 8 years ago). I am sick of what is effectively a 9-5 grind with extra hassle and responsibility for little extra reward.

    While I would love a job working in the great outdoors (mountains, bikes, nature -love ’em all), I am loathe to go down this route for fear of being sick of it in a few years (the company I set up was specific to a car marque that I was heavily interested in – I am now very disillusioned with them and their owners!) . No, for me, it will be retraining in a useful trade. Electrician or plumber. Something that will pay the bills and allow me to work when I want and free up more time for the stuff I love doing.

    I have enough savings to live off for a year or two if necessary, a supportive wife and no kids. I am not dreading this move in the slightest, although this may change as the end of April rolls around…..

    Premier Icon DezB
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    still a bit skint, works on one of their reserves and can be giving a tour to some kids one day, dry stone walling the next, painting a mural showing the seasons the other,

    Sounds perfect! 20 years of that I could look forward to…

    Premier Icon Del
    Subscriber

    No, for me, it will be retraining in a useful trade. Electrician or plumber. Something that will pay the bills and allow me to work when I want and free up more time for the stuff I love doing.

    chap i know was made redundant a few years ago. he saw the writing on the wall and did his sparky quals, plastering quals and all that before the event. he reckons he now earns nearly what he earned as an engineer ( mid 30s i’d expect ), but spends all evenings and spare time doing paperwork, whereas before in his old job he just walked out the gate and was done. yes – you can set your own agenda, but if that involves not doing too much work, just bear in mind that this will generate not too much money!

    wish you all the best though. wish i had the nerve tbh.

    DezB – I might join you. Unfortunatley I actually quite like my job

    andym
    Member

    Could you find a way to put your IT skills to use in a more positive setting – eg an organisation you believed in?

    the national trust are actively recruiting in the Peak District. not sure if you’d need experience though. get yourself on a HND course of some kind, countryside management or similar. be aware though that charities pay VERY poorly.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Could you find a way to put your IT skills to use in a more positive setting – eg an organisation you believed in?

    It’s a nice thought, but I kind of believe in what this company does – it’s a big business, no doubt, but all about healthcare and hospital supplies. Makes absolutely no difference in the day-to-day IT bollox though.
    The recently published Trek job was interesting, but I’d still be staring at a screen all day.

    Fagus
    Member

    I’ve just realised that it’s 13 years since I was shown the door from my nice managerial position. Nice salary, car, health cover etc. Didn’t like it but was too scared to change. After “agreeing to leave” I bumbed around for a couple of years doing similar jobs, but not realy liking it. Then by chance an opportunity arose to set myself up in a completely different line. Now instead of being the boss, I’m just a menial. But I am my own boss, and if a customer craps on me I can just walk away – they need me more than I need them. Haven’t touched the pay off money yet, and now have more money than I ever did, and am working far fewer hours. (Just had a day out on the bike.)

    Problem comes if you’ve got a wife and kids to support. Paying the mortgage, and food on the table is a big incentive to stay put. We’ve no kids so the wife was working, and had plenty of cash herself.

    You’ll have to get agreement from the management before you even think of it!!! What does she think? Any job can get boring after a few years. Out of the frying pan…The grass is always greener…

    Premier Icon thepurist
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    I ditched the world of IT in 2003, went back to school for a year and am now self (un)employed. I was in the consultancy side and got sick of all the corporate bollix and feeling that everything I was doing was pretty pointless. The upside is that I looked out the window this morning and thought ‘nice day, i’ll go for a bit of a ride’ – the downside is that I’ve probably earnt about as much in the last 3 years as I did in the year before I quit.

    I’ve got no dependents and MrsP earns a decent wage too, and I knew I was able to take a year’s break from earnings without putting anything at risk, si it was a fairly easy decision in the end.

    Premier Icon doug_basqueMTB.com
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    Well, it’s too early to say if it was a good move or not but I chucked my job last year and have been busy setting up a mountain bike holiday company in the basque country. I guess I’ll know in a couple of years if it was the right thing to do or not. I probably couldn’t have picked a worse time to do it though!

    The way I see it I don’t actually have to make much money to be in a similar financial position as I was previously. I’m early thirties and I couldn’t see myself sticking my job until I was 60 no matter what the financial reward. I have a Basque girl so it made it an easier decision for me.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    You’ll have to get agreement from the management before you even think of it!!! What does she think? Any job can get boring after a few years.

    She’s in a similar boat, in the world of teaching (lecturer) and looking for a change. Wouldn’t expect to stay living where we are, but someone cheaper, somewhere with a better quality of life for the kid, where he doesn’t have a fed up father coming home every day πŸ™‚
    I reckon the money I get only compensates for the complete lack of job satisfaction.
    It’s all a bit pie-in-the-sky at the mo, but I’m getting some good ideas off here. Namely, planning and qualifying for Forestry (or similar) work.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Where can I get me one a them Basque girls? πŸ˜‰

    i wouldn’t be walking out of a lecturing job at the moment, very secure and protected up to the eyeballs if made redundant

    Premier Icon doug_basqueMTB.com
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    DezB, right here, there’s loads of them πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Was that a job offer?!

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
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    Mrs_OAB and I, as well as the three kids, will decide this weekend if a huge move back to a job I love (outdoor instructor) and geographically (Sheffield to Loch Tay) is definitely happening.

    The job is on the table, we are expecting it to happen, just worries about how remote Killin is, and the usual house/money stuff.

    So a weekend in Killin it is. πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon doug_basqueMTB.com
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    Ha ha! It’d be great to be in a position to offer jobs right now!

    I found my basque girl in Fingers Piano Bar in Edinburgh (total dive) but I think that was their last one!

    Happy hunting!

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Good luck with your decision Matt.

    Dammit Doug, got my hopes up there. πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon dropoff
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    Just remember boys that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

    If you do leave can I have first dabs on the vacancy

    πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
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    Just remember boys that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

    I did my proposed job for 10 years before I do what I do now – and it was greener, and deeper and sweeter. 8)

    Premier Icon dropoff
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    Just saying that theres nowt wrong with most jobs, human beings just like to have a change. Personally I’d say if you want to do something then do it, but be prepared to be skint and working all the hours that god sends.

    burmaboy
    Member

    I got pushed out of my job (basically politely fired )in Financial recruitment in Oct last year. Had been in quite successfull but high pressure sales jobs for 8 years since I left college. Came as a huge blessing in disguise though. I landed a job as a cycling instructor. Work at schools a lot and also teach adults from complete beginners to quite advanced riding techniques for commuting through London. Very rewarding and I love the hours! Less stress, Im doing what I love and showing others how good cycling is. And i dont think I could work in a stuffy office ever again!

    Premier Icon snowslave
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    How many peeps in IT DON’T feel like this eh?

    MrNutt
    Member

    haha I also dumped my thriving (yet all consuming) career in IT and moved into technical project management, out of the frying pan and into the fire! πŸ˜€ but the industry I work in is hugely bizarre and I deal with some of the most demanding, unreasonable and downright original clients it makes it interesting enough to be tolerable (rather than working with/for mundane, thinking out of the box pushing the envelope tossers).

    That said, I to have aspirations to set up a mountain biking, art/photography, birding retreat over in the Mountains of Madrid!! (due to having a Spaniard of my own!)

    ell_tell
    Member

    What job do you do now then MrNutt if you dont mind me asking?

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Just remember boys that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence

    Everything’s greener than the inside of my office!

    This isn’t something I’m taking lightly, I haven’t just decided this morning and posted up here. Have been thinking about it for years and never had the bottle. Leave it much longer and it’ll be too late – will end up in a job I hate for the rest of my life (like my dad, who now has mental health problems (hereditary?)).
    Fell into IT because I never knew what I wanted to do and now I feel like I do.
    Still, financial security, mortage, nice house etc etc may win out in the end. I’m going to try not to let it this time though.

    matt_outandabout. I’m not far from there – near Kenmore at the other end of Loch Tay. Don’t really go Killin way much but I understand it has a pretty good community.

    Sheffield to Killin – you will either love it or loathe it, but not sure you can tell about a lifestyle move from one visit. We did about 12 years of holidays in Scotland before we decided to up sticks from the south. The travelling now is a bit of a pain, but worth the extra hassle and time

    Smee
    Member

    MatOAB – I lived in Killin for a few months – it isn’t remote – great place to live. Take the job or I’ll hunt you down and shoot you. πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Sitting at my desk at 23.45, drafting yet another agreement for a bunch of ungrateful clients and reading this….

    It’s little wonder I and so many other lawyers would happily do something else. But, sadly, the risk averse nature of the job means all sense of ambition and imagination and desire to leap without looking has long ago been beaten out of us.

    πŸ˜₯

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    Hah how appropriate. I’ve just been talking about the same thing recently.
    I own a successful business, make enough money to be comfortable … and hate it. Its sounds ungrateful in a lot of ways and i worked really hard to get this beast to where it is now but i cannot stand the IT industry, the general lack of desire to do things properly and the ‘paradigm shifting’ twunts that inhabit my everyday world.
    I once cleaned grease traps and i think i had more job satisfaction which is quite telling !
    I’ve documented and distrubuted to my staff my ’12 month exit plan’. They have all been given (if they wanted it) a %age share in the company. I will retain 51% but they can have the rest FoC and we’ll do a profit share. The company will bash on without me. I’ll take 6 months off with the occasional dip in and out if i am required while still retaining some semblance of an income to maintain my bikes and beer habit. My wife will work at her job as she loves it and I’ll spend my time painting our house, doing the garden and relaxing. My Dads really sick and won’t last long and he has been on my case about doing everything you can while you can – and he is so right.

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