Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 131 total)
  • Jigsaw and Router for basic cabinets
  • Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    I’m in the market for a Router and Jigsaw, cabinets/drawers and awkward space storage solutions.

    Not a serious cabinet maker, and not going to be. Any reason to look beyond Ryobi if going cordless? As far as Routers are concerned I don’t have a battery system in place yet so have that cost to add in.

    The other way of looking at it, is it’s only the Router that’s not available with my current (Worx) battery set up. So maybe a budget corded Makita or similar?

    Premier Icon jimw
    Free Member

    I would have thought that in most situations that a router would be needed, a corded one would be perfectly acceptable. I can see the advantages in having a cordless jigsaw

    Premier Icon grum
    Free Member

    Yeah not an expert but was gonna say same. If you don’t already have the batteries I’d be looking at corded for the router.

    I have Ryobi stuff (not a router) and it’s good but the batteries are usually quite expensive. Milwaukee is the nicest stuff I’ve used.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Full Member

    *Tannoy* @kayak23 to the forum.

    Premier Icon sillysilly
    Full Member

    Good thread, looking for the same to make some speaker cabinets.

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    1/2 you need power.
    1/4 trimmer the battery is an option but not for stock production ie putting a radius on 100mts of window bead.
    They are fine for occasionally cutting a slot or rebate.
    I’m not fussy with jigsaws tbh my old DeWalt is still going strong and it’s 20 + years old and got a battering doind second fix on new builds.
    For home use a track saw is better for straight lines.
    My jigsaw now only comes out for radius work and general bodge stuff I do use it for cutting ally sheets.
    Also if your getting a 1/2 router make sure you understand how it works I’ve seen some horrible accidents with them and 90% where user error they don’t leave anything to sew back on

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    If you don’t already have the batteries I’d be looking at corded for the router.

    As I typed it out I basically found myself thinking “do I really need cordless, no, not really”

    For the usage in mind corded seems the better choice. Which at least narrows the choices a bit, and possibly means a better router for the same outlay.

    Premier Icon kimura54321
    Free Member

    For the money the Katsu 1/4” routers are very hard to beat, they are effectively the same as the Makita ones and compatible with all their accessories and rails/plunge bases.

    For £40 and corded it should last you years for bits of DIY. Just get a decent starter set of trimming, chamfer and rounding cutters from somewhere like Axminster.

    Will try and get a direct link:

    101748 Katsu Electric Hand Trimmer Wood Laminator Router Joiners Tool 220V 710W

    Premier Icon WorldClassAccident
    Free Member

    Avoid battery unless you ready need the ability to work without cables. They are more expensive, heavier and less powerful. Not ideal in a tool

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Edit reading fail

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    Are you thinking of using or making a router table? If so definitely 1/2 inch is the way to go much safer too. Don’t buy a trend router the bits are fantastic the tools not so good.
    Elu if your old enough to rember where the goto DeWalt brought them out painted them yellow and they where ok.
    The last home use one I used was a Makita it was ok just.

    Make sure it has soft start

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    Katsu are not bad tbf it’s a clone of the old bottle trimmer that Makita made just don’t drop it. I may have dropped one 😂

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Watch a few of Peter Millard’s videos on YT – loads of tips on how to make cabinets. NB he never uses a jigsaw!

    https://www.youtube.com/c/PeterMillard/videos

    Premier Icon kimura54321
    Free Member

    @pk13 – Agree with you on the safety part, even the 1/4” ones can give horrific injuries.

    So basics like eye & ear protection, no loose clothing/hair, don’t put down when moving, unplug before changing blades and think about the direction of cut and any obstructions are really important. Also clamp all your work and hold the router with two hands.

    Having read a few horror stories about people being chased by or holding the work directly in the cutting path I would really like to avoid repeating their mistakes…

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Are you thinking of using or making a router table?

    At this point no, I’m quite space constricted but I do have a solid workbench for clamping.

    So basics like eye & ear protection, no loose clothing/hair, don’t put down when moving, unplug before changing blades and think about the direction of cut and any obstructions are really important. Also clamp all your work and hold the router with two hands.

    Having read a few horror stories about people being chased by or holding the work directly in the cutting path I would really like to avoid repeating their mistakes…

    Absolutely to all that.

    I’m definitely still in the figuring stuff out phase.

    Peter Millard’s videos on YT

    Perfect, thank you.

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Budget is up to £200 for the tool, extra for the bits.

    That’s a limit not a target.

    Premier Icon tillydog
    Free Member

    Unless you want to cut curves, you may find a cheap track saw is much more useful for cabinet making than a jigsaw. They will turn out cut edges that are ready to assemble but anything cut with a jigsaw will need to be planed/sanded/routed to a line

    Premier Icon GeForceJunky
    Full Member

    I love my little Katsu, but I’ve never tried anything better to compare. Definitely get the optional plunge base for it though.

    Premier Icon intheborders
    Free Member

    Don’t buy a trend router the bits are fantastic the tools not so good.

    Unsure why you say this, as I find my Trend T5 a really nice tool to use and more fitments etc than pretty much anything.

    I reckon a 1/4″ router is fine for pretty much everything I need (except kitchen worktops), usually worse case it takes more ‘passes’.

    I’ve also a corded Makita palm router, full kit for about £150 – but my Trend is my ‘go-to’.

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Unless you want to cut curves, you may find a cheap track saw is much more useful for cabinet making than a jigsaw. They will turn out cut edges that are ready to assemble but anything cut with a jigsaw will need to be planed/sanded/routed to a line

    The jigsaw is mostly for other jobs tbh, that needs to be cordless.

    I have (possession of) a Festool TS55 track saw, which for my standards is pretty amazing. It’s actually my neighbours but he’s basically given it to me to use as he doesn’t have space for it, but doesn’t want to sell it either although if he does im having it.

    Premier Icon phil5556
    Free Member

    I felt like a pro once I bought a decent track saw (Makita). It wasn’t cheap though.

    I’m not fussy with jigsaws tbh my old DeWalt is still going strong and it’s 20 + years old and got a battering doind second fix on new builds.

    For years I used an old Bosch one, it finally died a couple of years ago and I replaced it with a Makita – I was surprised just how much better it is to use, probably mainly down to the extra weight. Annoyingly it was right at the end of a 9 month camper build, I would have replaced it sooner if I’d known what a difference it would make.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    As we’ve got a wordwork thread going already, I could do with some advice please.

    I need to cut a long thin strip off some shelving boards (to remove prob 20mm width and a bit more than a metre long).

    Any idea what the cheapest decent way of doing it is please? If I try with a handsaw I will 100% get it wonky.

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Can you borrow a track saw from somewhere?

    Premier Icon retrorick
    Full Member

    I have a Katsu palm router and a Aldi 2 handed router. Bought the big one first, use the little one more often. Rarely use them though. Hardly ever use my jigsaw. I bought a tilting base for the Katsu but not needed to use it so far.

    Premier Icon tillydog
    Free Member

    I have (possession of) a Festool TS55 track saw,

    You’re sorted then! 🙂

    I need to cut a long thin strip off some shelving boards

    Find someone with a track saw or table saw. Whereabouts are you?

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    @intheborders
    Wow I’ve killed 2 of those will never get another. First was the top bearing failure, second the wire snapped on the winding.
    The first was not mine
    So I replaced it with a DeWalt.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    I’ve had a few routers and quite a few at the budget end too.

    My big router that lives in a table is a Trend T11ek. Very good.

    As above, the Katsu ones are actually pretty good. They’re not quite the same in build quality as the Makita but perfectly good.
    I have a cordless Makita, Katsu and a corded Katsu.
    All excellent and being able to interchange bases etc is very handy.

    I had an Erbauer half inch but returned it as it had play in the bushings in the plunge mechanism. Dangerous. Don’t seem good build quality.

    I’ve had a few Triton ones, the Tra001 and Jof, both of which have started to have issues with the spindle lock auto feature.

    If you want a smaller 1/4″ tool, then the Katsu is amazing for the money.
    For a 1/2″ router I’d be inclined to spend more.

    Jigsaws I’ve had a Hitachi and now have a Makita. Both good but battery platform is everything if going cordless.

    (Trend T5)I’ve killed 2 of those will never get another.

    I guess there are terrible experiences for most brands. I’ve not had any issues as yet.
    It’s Erbauer and Triton for me that I don’t recommend.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    Any idea what the cheapest decent way of doing it is please? If I try with a handsaw I will 100% get it wonky.

    If you cannot find someone else to do it for you, use a hand saw but clamp a straight bit of 2×4 or similar along the mark, use this to keep the saw straight and plumb. Take you time as when you get tired you are most likely to wonder.

    Also new sharp saw, higher tpi for better finish, score along the line with a sharp blade on both side before starting.

    Also as you progress wedge the cut open to minimise pinching, wax blade if you really need but this will wear off quickly on a long run.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    a straight bit of 2×4

    😂

    Premier Icon ernielynch
    Free Member

    Elu if your old enough to rember where the goto

    My quarter inch Elu router which is at least 35 years old and has suffered endless abuse on site is still going strong, in fact I’ll be using tomorrow to hang doors.

    I recently borrowed someone’s quarter inch Trend router which I thought was the pretty much the identical design, I was shocked how crappy it was, nothing operated smoothly on it, gave up using it.

    My Bosch jigsaw from the same era works absolutely fine too, I’m not bothered that it isn’t tooless blade change. Back in the day Bosch were the go to manufacturer for jigsaw as I believe they invented portable jigsaws, no idea about these days though.

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    Yup the blue Bosch with little spring blade removal then the twist top like my DeWalt.
    Nothing made like old days 😃

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    a straight bit of 2×4

    My local timber merchant only sells banana versions….

    Premier Icon pk13
    Full Member

    @kayak23
    Trend T11ek is the high end I believe.
    I think triton and Erbauer are from the same parent company? Tmi? Or something.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    Related question…

    Does anyone know any good books or Youtube channels for someone who has never built any furniture before? I want to attempt a wall to wall TV cabinet and then maybe some wardrobes under a wonky attic ceiling.

    I’m also dying to play with a router so I’m reading all the tips!

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    @tillydog, Sheffield, on the offchance!

    If you cannot find someone else to do it for you, use a hand saw but clamp a straight bit of 2×4 or similar along the mark, use this to keep the saw straight and plumb. Take you time as when you get tired you are most likely to wonder.

    Also new sharp saw, higher tpi for better finish, score along the line with a sharp blade on both side before starting.

    Also as you progress wedge the cut open to minimise pinching, wax blade if you really need but this will wear off quickly on a long run.

    That’s extremely helpful @TheBrick, thank you.
    I think I have a big long straight edge I can use for this purpose.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    I’m in the market for a Router and Jigsaw

    Routers are power hungry, so avoid cordless, chances are you’ll be working right next to a power point. Jigsaws not so much, but seem a bit of a stretch to go cordless when as said power points are right there.

    Bosch make a nice basic jigsaw, the GST 90. Its under a hundred quid and will be good for just about everything you need.

    Routers, tricky. Obviously you’re not going to put it to heavy use 5 days a week so a bit down the rankings would probably be fine. But it’s also a very versatile tool and better quality will last longer. so maybe something like a Makita RPO900X

    The makita router isnt variable speed,but it is very capable.If you think you need variable speed or more versatile in the future maybe something by Trend. The T4EK or T5EB.

    The T4EK can be dismounted off its base and used with grinding and carving cutters, the T5EB would be better if you get into this and want to mount it in a small router table.

    Premier Icon tillydog
    Free Member

    @finbar – Nowhere near me, sorry. Fingers crossed though 🙂

    Premier Icon dovebiker
    Free Member

    A jigsaw isn’t really the first tool I’d grab for cabinet making. However, my Makita DSS501Z cordless circular saw is awesome – I have bigger, more powerful saws but you really need to think about setting up and clamping your jobs correctly. With the little Makita, 2 clamps, a good straight edge and a big square and you’re away. You can also use it one-handed without worrying about kickback. Agree on making a router table with adjustable fence for doing things like rebates etc.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    Lidl have a corded router and some bits for £35 just now.

    If you’re looking at battery stuff and already have Worx, then look at Wesco (Amazon) and Bauker (Toolstation). There are also some other brands that might match up too.
    I’ve recently bought a few of their tools after already having a Worx hydroshot. The batteries are all compatible, though some of them require their own chargers – haven’t quite figured out the compatibility matrix there!
    They’re good tools – not as nice as my Dewalt XR drill and driver, but also much much cheaper. And they get the job done.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    Does anyone know any good books or Youtube channels for someone who has never built any furniture before? I want to attempt a wall to wall TV cabinet and then maybe some wardrobes under a wonky attic ceiling.

    There’s endless stuff to filter through on YouTube, some ok, some not so great.
    For built in furniture, Peter Millard and Freebird Interiors are a good start.
    Your algorithm will do the rest.

    Also, if I can help with any queries in any way I’m always happy to. Quite a few makers on here who are very helpful.
    Pm me.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 131 total)

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