Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total)
  • Is 1:50 (2%) too much fall for a patio?
  • 5plusn8
    Member

    It is noticeable…

    According to paving expert typical fall for residential paving is 1:60 so you’re not a million miles away from that. I would only alter it if every time I looked at it I thought “that don’t look right” in which case it’d be worth it just to quieten that internal voice.

    http://www.pavingexpert.com/gradient_01.htm

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    Subscriber

    Does food roll of your plate when sat at a table on it? If not, all good.

    nickjb
    Member

    Sounds fine to me. Doubt you can see it unless its against a fence (and then I’d suspect the fence is out of level)

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    Subscriber

    Just so you can gauge it against something.

    Road camber is generally 1:40 (2.5%) supermarkets usually want max 1:60 in their car parks so people can easily push trolleys.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Ive set out a combined bin store and bike store today at that grade. I don’t expect Dan Atherton to use it as a section of his next red bull hardline course.

    wrightyson
    Member

    It also depends how it falls in relation to it’ surroundings. Is it all falling away from the house at that grade. Can you get perpendicular and a distance away from it to notice the fall or does it go full width etc etc

    andykirk
    Member

    I’d say 1:50 is pretty steep, given 1:200 is the minimum gradient for road drainage.

    Premier Icon cloudnine
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    Once your beloved  has decomposed a bit I’m sure it will flatten out

    Premier Icon bodgy
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    Sounds well steep to me, unless you have very specific reasons that you can’t put in a retainer and backfill with crusher to make it level (obviously that means more groundworks and expense). At least you’re not going to get puddles!

    timba
    Member

    “It is noticeable…”

    Yes, I’ve had this. My paving wasn’t close to a building and a small area, I set it almost level and it drained well. If 1:200 is good enough for a road…

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    1:200 is not good for a road.

    Most roads are designed to be no slacker than 1:100 longitudinally most councils will want see 1:80 if achievable.

    aP
    Member

    1:50 will be fine. It’s the default back fall for a railway station platform, do you notice that when you catch the train in the morning?

    Any less such as >1:100 is likely to result in ponding.

    allthegear
    Member

    supermarkets usually want max 1:60 in their car parks so people can easily push trolleys.

    i can assure you the Morrison’s in Yeadon isn’t 1:60. Felt more like 1:5 when I was a schoolkid working there!!!

    rachel

    Rockhopper
    Member

    1:60 is the maximum gradient in car parks etc for wheelchair accessibility. They’d try and achieve that all over the car park if possible.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
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    Roads – it’s the camber that provides the drainage, not just the longitudinal gradient.

    As said above, footpaths are (supposed to be) 1:60, so walk down the street and see if that’s noticeable to you.

    5plusn8
    Member

    Well its a patio so think tables and chairs…

    5plusn8
    Member

    Anyway, luckily its only marked out and graded so we are going to fix this. Meanwhile we are having a discussion about joint gaps, landscaper wants 15mm, I want 5mm. Its sawn and honed indian sandstone, 600×900.
    He says smaller than 15mm and the sand cement joint, he suggested, will not stay in. I want smaller gaps because I have the same flooring for my garden room and kitchen and I want ti to be tight and neat.

    Can sand cement stay in 5mm gap, or should they joint it with another product?

    wrightyson
    Member

    Firstly before pointing let’s get it laid right. Indian sandstone has a nasty habit of popping and rocking if not done properly. Full bed and a SBR/cement primer painted on the back of each slab prior to laying 😉

    5plusn8
    Member

    Thats exactly the plan,  There is a concrete base, its been graded with 20mm to dust to get the level. Then gonna use cement/sbr primer on sand cement bed.

    So joint size then?

    wrightyson
    Member

    5mm is tight. I doubt it will last more than one winter, you just won’t be able to consolidate it properly in the joint. Some of the epoxy hose in types are good. I used it on my Indian sandstone. Prep is the key tho as it’s **** expensive so you really only want to be filling the joints and not any voids. There is a guide on the tub and I’m sure that recommends nothing less than 10mm for that type of pointing.

    5plusn8
    Member

    Ok cheers, it would be good to match joint size throughout, I rally dont want 15-20mm gaps in the house. So will try for 10mm throughout.

Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total)

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